Performance Management in Healthcare: From Key Performance Indicators to Balanced Scorecard

Performance Management in Healthcare: From Key Performance Indicators to Balanced Scorecard

by Bryan Bergeron MD
     
 

Performance management, often referred to as process management, is a strategy that a healthcare facility can employ to achieve high levels of quality, safety, and end user satisfaction, as well as financial solvency. The basis of performance management is the effective use of resources, as measured through key performance indicators (KPIs),. There is more to…  See more details below

Overview

Performance management, often referred to as process management, is a strategy that a healthcare facility can employ to achieve high levels of quality, safety, and end user satisfaction, as well as financial solvency. The basis of performance management is the effective use of resources, as measured through key performance indicators (KPIs),. There is more to performance management than selecting a few KPIs from a list and feeding them into a graphical dashboard system.

Written for CIOs and senior IT managers, this practical resource encourages the leadership and vision needed for a performance measurement initiative. It provides a high-level review of the quality/safety initiatives in healthcare, describes the implementation process from an IT perspective, and offers high-level clinical, financial, and cultural details. It also features an extensive listing of clinical and non-clinical KPIs; a glossary including financial, medical, and operational terms; and appendices of organizations and sources of indicators and benchmarks.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Jay M Anderson, BS, MBA (Northwestern Memorial Hospital)
Description: This text is essentially a reference text for health care managers and IT professionals attempting to understand the broad spectrum of topics which encompass healthcare performance management.
Purpose: This text attempts to equip readers with the knowledge necessary to provide the leadership and vision for a PM initiative at their institution. This text is incredibly timely given the recent 5 year anniversary of the IOM report Crossing the Quality Chasm. While it is unlikely the reader would achieve the stated goal through this text alone, the reader will receive a strong exposure to the breadth required for a strong PM program. The reader receives a uniquely-strong listing of the clinical and non-clinical performance indicators being utilized within the industry and an exposure to a fairly comprehensive listing of the relevant indictor development organizations.
Audience: According to the author this text is intended to target healthcare Information Technology executives and professionals, while assuming a CIO to IT managerial-level reader who is knowledgeable of the IT operation of a healthcare organization. I find this to be a suitable audience for this book. In addition to the target audience, healthcare administrators would likely find the indicator chapters and their associated appendices a helpful reference. The author appears to be a credible authority on the topic in general. The book would likely have benefited from a co-author from a provider working directly in the field.
Features: In attempting to provide a broad PM overview topics covered range from the general PM cycle, to key performance indicators (clinical and non-clinical), benchmarking, reporting, statistics and the required behavioral change. The strength of the text lies in the comprehensive listings of indicators and their references within the appendices. These listings are a useful guide to anyone working within or around the healthcare field. New managers would do well to review the indicators listed within the text after assuming a new operational area. The broad nature of the indicator sections contrast directly with the fairly shallow coverage of benchmarking, behavior change and the performance management cycle. Within these sections the reader could be left with an inappropriately shallow understanding of the efforts required to be effective within a strong PM program. Lastly, the stand alone statistics chapter feels out of place. The material is solid, but would likely be more appropriate as an appendix.
Assessment: The field of comprehensive PM within healthcare is still in its earliest stages with significant complexities. This text is a welcomed reference guide to the reader and worth being on the shelves of healthcare management and IT professionals.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780976127741
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
01/01/2006
Pages:
285
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.80(d)

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