Permanently New Yorkers: Final Digs of the Notable and Notorious

Permanently New Yorkers: Final Digs of the Notable and Notorious

by Patricia Brooks
     
 
They're Always Home!

Death may have taken some of New York's most famous (and infamous) characters, but our fascination with them never ends. Presidents and pathfinders, authors and actors, musicians and military heroes, saints and scoundrels--they all populate the hallowed grounds of the Empire State.

Join Patricia Brooks as she resurrects these larger-than-life

Overview

They're Always Home!

Death may have taken some of New York's most famous (and infamous) characters, but our fascination with them never ends. Presidents and pathfinders, authors and actors, musicians and military heroes, saints and scoundrels--they all populate the hallowed grounds of the Empire State.

Join Patricia Brooks as she resurrects these larger-than-life personalities through spirited biographies and sepulchral photographs. From grand tombs to modest plots, you'll unearth the final resting places of more than 175 of New York's most intriguing permanent residents. Also inside:

* cemetery locations, contacts, and visiting hours
* information on graveyard tours, walks, and special events
* directions to related homes and museums nearby
* local restaurant recommendations for those with a lively appetite

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780762737949
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2005
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.38(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.79(d)

Read an Excerpt

Maple Grove Cemetery
Main Street, south of the junction with Church Street

The main street in the village of Hoosick Falls (population 3,500) leads south to the cemetery (circa 1854), which lies on both sides of the road. The new part is on the left (east) side, marked by stone pillars, trimly shaped evergreen bushes, and a bronze name plaque. The pastoral scene is straight out of a Grandma Moses painting: neat, grassy mounds; a scattering of oaks and other trees; a road winding upward to a hilltop; scores of well-kept headstones and a few mausoleums; and nineteenth-century statuary.
Note the somber headstone of Ruth Sprague (1807-1816), which bears these words:
"dau. of Gibson & Elizabeth Sprague, died Jan. 11, 1816; aged 9 years 4 mo's & 3 days. She was stolen from the grave by Roderick R. Clow & dissected at Dr. P. M. Armstrong's office in Hoosick, N.Y., from which place her mutilated remains were obtained & deposited here. Her body dissected by fiendish Men, her bones anatomised, her soul we trust has risen to God where few Physicians rise." This sorry tale is a grim reminder that grave-robbing for medical purposes was not unusual in the nineteenth century.

Meet the Author

Patricia Brooks has written other guidebooks, including Where the Bodies Are and Food Lover's Guide to Connecticut (both Globe Pequot). She is also the Connecticut restaurant critic for the New York Times. When not dining or touring graveyards, she resides peacefully in New Canaan, Connecticut.

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