Persian Letters / Edition 1

Persian Letters / Edition 1

1.0 1
by Montesquieu
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0872204901

ISBN-13: 9780872204904

Pub. Date: 09/01/1999

Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.

Based on the 1758 edition, this translation strives for fidelity and retains Montesquieu's paragraphing. George R. Healy's Introduction discusses The Persian Letters as a kind of overture to the Enlightenment, a work of remarkable diversity designed more to explore a problem of great urgency for eighteenth century thought than to resolve it: that of

Overview

Based on the 1758 edition, this translation strives for fidelity and retains Montesquieu's paragraphing. George R. Healy's Introduction discusses The Persian Letters as a kind of overture to the Enlightenment, a work of remarkable diversity designed more to explore a problem of great urgency for eighteenth century thought than to resolve it: that of discovering universals, or at least the pragmatic constants, amid the diversity of human culture and society, and of confronting the proposition that there are no values in human relationships except those imposed by force or agreed upon in self-interested conventions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872204904
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Series:
Hackett Classics Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
823,108
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction 17(17)
Further reading 34(3)
PERSIAN LETTERS 37(248)
Montesquieu's Preface 39(2)
Letter 1 Usbek to Rustan. The virgin of Kum; Usbek's and Rica's quest for knowledge
41(1)
2 Usbek to the First Black Eunuch. The eunuch's office-service and command; orders concerning the wives
41(1)
3 Zashi to Usbek. Memories of winning a contest of beauty against the other wives; reproaches for Usbek's departure
42(2)
4 Zephis to Usbek. Protests against being deprived of the slave-girl Zelid
44(1)
5 Rustan to Usbek. Disapproval in Ispahan of Usbek's departure
45(1)
6 Usbek to Nessir. Regrets at leaving his country and his wives; jealous fears for the future
45(1)
7 Fatme to Usbek. Dreams about Usbek; women's desires and the advantage men take of them
46(2)
8 Usbek to Rustan. Reasons for his departure: dangers at court for a man of virtue
48(1)
9 The first Eunuch to Ibbi. His castration; tactics of both sides in the conflict between eunuchs and wives
49(3)
Letter 10 Mirza to Usbek. Does virtue lead to happiness?
52(1)
11 Usbek to Mirza. His answer: the parable of the Troglodytes, whose complete selfishness led to disaster
53(3)
12 Usbek to the same. The Troglodytes: a second more virtuous generation prospers
56(2)
13 Usbek to the same. The Troglodytes: examples of unselfish behaviour; defeat of the invaders
58(2)
14 Usbek to the same. The Troglodytes: election of a king; his regrets
60(1)
15 The First Eunuch to Jahrum. His affection for Jahrum; how he looked after him in boyhood
61(1)
16 Usbek to Mohammed Ali. Admiration of the mullah's wisdom and request for his protection
62(1)
17 Usbek to the same. Why is pork impure?
63(1)
18 Mohammed Ali to Usbek. His answer: a legend about the animals in the Ark
64(2)
19 Usbek to Rustan. Turkey: economic and military backwardness
66(1)
20 Usbek to Zashi. Reproaches for being found alone with a eunuch
67(2)
21 Usbek to the First White Eunuch. Threats of punishment if he is not more careful
69(1)
22 Jahrum to the First Eunuch. Usbek's decision to send Jahrum back to Ispahan
70(1)
23 Usbek to Ibben. First reactions to a European town
71(1)
24 Rica to Ibben. Surprising aspects of French life; the King's power over his subjects, and the Pope's over him; his invisible enemies
72(2)
Letter 25 Usbek to Ibben. Rhedi, Rica, and Usbek's feelings for Ibben
74(1)
26 Usbek to Roxana. Her chastity and her love for Usbek compared to the immodesty of French women
75(3)
27 Usbek to Nessir. Letters for Ispahan; his feelings of depression
78(1)
28 Rica to ***. Curious sights at the theatre; a letter from an actress at the Opera
79(2)
29 Rica to Ibben. The Pope, bishops, heresy, and the Inquisition
81(2)
30 Rica to the same. The interest taken in him by the Parisians until he changes his costume
83(1)
31 Rhedi to Usbek. Advantages and disadvantages of Venice for a Muslim
84(1)
32 Rica to ***. The Fifteen-Score
84(1)
33 Usbek to Rhedi. Physical and rational remedies for despondency
85(1)
34 Usbek to Ibben. The gaiety of the French in comparison with Persians; the influence of eunuchs in this respect
86(2)
35 Usbek to Jemshid. Request for his views on the Christians; similarities between Christianity and Islam
88(1)
36 Usbek to Rhedi. Coffee-houses and the disputes which go on in them; other habitual controversialists
89(2)
37 Usbek to Ibben. Louis XIV: inconsistencies in his behaviour
91(1)
38 Rica to Ibben. Eastern and Western attitudes to women; a philosopher's feminist arguments
92(2)
Letter 39 Hadji Ibbi to ben Joshua. Legends of the birth of Mohammed
94(1)
40 Usbek to Ibben. Funerals, and the Grand, Mogul's weight
95(1)
41 The First Black Eunuch to Usbek. Suggestion that a slave should be castrated
96(1)
42 Pharan to Usbek. Plea to be spared castration
97(1)
43 Usbek to Pharan. Pharan's plea granted
98(1)
44 Usbek to Rhedi. Examples of social conceit, in France and elsewhere
98(1)
45 Rica to Usbek. An alchemist and his fortune
99(2)
46 Usbek to Rhedi. How to please God independently of sectarian disputes
101(1)
47 Zashi to Usbek. An adventurous expedition
102(2)
48 Usbek to Rhedi. In a country house: a tax-farmer, a society confessor, a poet, an old soldier and a womanizer
104(5)
49 Rica to Usbek. A monk's plans for a mission to Persia
109(1)
50 Rica to ***. Praise of modesty; a conceited talker
110(1)
51 Nargum to Usbek. Russia, its king, and some strange customs concerning women; letter from a Russian wife
111(2)
52 Rica to Usbek. The vanity of four women, from twenty to eighty
113(2)
53 Zelis to Usbek. Plans for a marriage between a eunuch and a slave-girl
115(1)
54 Rica to Usbek. Two would-be wits discuss their tactics
116(2)
55 Rica to Ibben. European customs concerning sex and marriage
118(1)
56 Usbek to Ibben. Gambling and its popularity with French women
119(1)
57 Usbek to Rhedi. Monks and their vows; conversation with a casuist
120(2)
58 Rica to Rhedi. Ingenious ways of making a living in Paris
122(1)
59 Rica to Usbek. Self-interested nostalgia; the relativity of human judgements
123(2)
60 Usbek to Ibben. Judaism and other religions; the decline of intolerance in Europe
125(1)
61 Usbek to Rhedi. A clergyman on the difficulties of relationships with the laity
126(2)
62 Zelis to Usbek. The upbringing of her daughter; factors involved in women's subordination to men; her private pleasures
128(1)
63 Rica to Usbek. National character and the influence of women in France and Persia
129(1)
64 The Chief Black Eunuch to Usbek. Indiscipline in the seraglio; recommendations to follow the methods of the eunuch's first teacher
130(3)
65 Usbek to his wives. Reproaches for their bad behaviour
133(1)
66 Rica to ***. Intellectual pretensions in France; foolish writers; attack on anthologists
134(1)
67 Ibben to Usbek. Friendship; the story of Apheridon and Astarte, the Gabar brother and sister
135(8)
68 Rica to Usbek. The judge who sold his books
143(1)
69 Usbek to Rhedi. The perfections of God; how can men have free will if God foresees their actions?
144(3)
Letter 70 Zelis to Usbek A young man repudiates his newly-married wife
147(1)
71 Usbek to Zelis. The impossibility of proving whether a woman is a virgin
148(1)
72 Rica to Usbek. The decisioneer
148(1)
73 Rica to ***. The idiosyncrasies of the French Academy
149(1)
74 Usbek to Rica. Arrogance and sense of position in noblemen
150(1)
75 Usbek to Rhedi. Christian changeability and unfaithfulness to their beliefs
151(1)
76 Usbek to Ibben. Doubts concerning suicide
152(2)
77 Ibben to Usbek. Reasons for laws against suicide
154(1)
78 Rica to Usbek. Spanish solemnity, pride, devoutness, and other oddities; French lunacy
155(2)
79 The Chief Black Eunuch to Usbek. Inspection and purchase of a Circassian slave-girl
157(1)
80 Usbek to Rhedi. The best mode of government; the advantages of a mild policy in dealing with political crimes
158(2)
81 Nargum to Usbek. The Tartars and their unrecorded glory
160(1)
82 Rica to Ibben. Bad habits in conversation
161(1)
83 Usbek to Rhedi. The universal principle of justice, in God and man
162(1)
84 Rica to ***. Praise of the Invalides and its inhabitants
163(1)
85 Usbek to Mirza. The disadvantages of religious intolerance, in Persia and Europe
164(2)
86 Rica to ***. Families and family law
166(1)
87 Rica to ***. Sociability carried to extremes; epitaph of a visitor
167(2)
88 Usbek to Rhedi. Social importance in France and Persia
169(1)
89 Usbek to Ibben. The desire for glory and its consequences in France, the ancient states, and Persia
169(2)
90 Usbek to the same. The feudal 'point of honour'
171(1)
91 Usbek to Rustan. An unworthy envoy from Persia
172(1)
92 Usbek to Rhedi. Louis XIV's death and Philippe d'Orleans' manoeuvres to become regent
173(1)
93 Usbek to his brother the santon. The santon's holiness; the interpretation of legends about hermits
174(1)
94 Usbek to Rhedi. International law and its distortions
175(1)
95 Usbek to the same. Sanctions in international law
176(2)
96 The First Eunuch to Usbek. Purchase of an Indian woman for Usbek's brother's seraglio; effects of her arrival there; plea for Usbek's return
178(2)
97 Usbek to Hosain. Western science and Eastern religion
180(2)
98 Usbek to Ibben. The swiftness of changes of fortune in France
182(1)
99 Rica to Rhedi. The caprices of fashion
183(1)
100 Rica to the same. French authority over fashion and dependence in legislative matters
184(2)
101 Usbek to ***. The ignorant bishop and his adviser
186(1)
102 Usbek to Ibben. The exercise of royal power in Europe and Persia
187(2)
Letter 103 Usbek to the same. The Asians' indifference towards their rulers and the likelihood of assassination
189(1)
104 Usbek to the same. English ideas about the bond between king and people
190(2)
105 Rhedi to Usbek. Doubts concerning the value of technical progress
192(1)
106 Usbek to Rhedi. Refutation of Rhedi's doubts; the dependence of national power on the industriousness of the people
193(3)
107 Rica to Ibben. The young Louis XV; the political influence of women
196(2)
108 Usbek to ***. Literary journals; reviews, reviewers and writers
198(1)
109 Rica to ***. Trivial controversies at the University of Paris and in Spain
199(1)
110 Rica to ***. The difficulties of being a women of fashion
200(1)
111 Usbek to ***. Propaganda warfare at the time of the Fronde
201(1)
112 Rhedi to Usbek. The problem of the depopulation of the modern world
202(2)
113 Usbek to Rhedi. Universal catastrophes which cause depopulation; the Flood and the question of the creation of man
204(2)
114 Usbek to the same. Polygamy as a cause of depopulation
206(2)
115 Usbek to the same. How the Roman slave system encouraged population and wealth
208(1)
116 Usbek to the same. The Christian ban on divorce as a cause of depopulation
209(2)
117 Usbek to the same. Monasticism as a cause of depopulation; economic advantages of Protestantism
211(2)
118 Usbek to the same. The African slave trade as a cause of depopulation
213(1)
119 Usbek to the same. Religious and other beliefs which affect population
214(1)
120 Usbek to the same. Causes of depopulation among primitive tribes
215(1)
121 Usbek to the same. Colonies as a cause of depopulation; the disasters due to the Conquistadores
216(3)
122 Usbek to the same. The effect on population of different modes of government
219(2)
123 Usbek to Mohammed Ali. Defeats inflicted by the Christians on the Turks
221(1)
124 Usbek to Rhedi. The generosity of kings to their courtiers; an imaginary edict in their favour, at the expense of other classes
221(2)
125 Rica to ***. The pleasures of Paradise; a Hindu widow and the rite of suttee
223(1)
126 Rica to Usbek. Sympathy towards a prince imprisoned for conspiracy
224(1)
127 Rica to Ibben. The chief minister of Charles XII of Sweden and ministerial influence on kings
225(1)
128 Rica to Usbek. In a coffee-house; the mathematician and the translator of Horace
226(3)
Letter 129 Usbek to Rhedi. The shortcomings of legislators; the importance of paternal authority
229(1)
130 Rica to ***. The futilities of newsmongers; three letters from them
230(3)
131 Rhedi to Rica. The prevalence of republican government in ancient times
233(2)
132 Rica to ***. In a coffee-house: the value of money as against land; fears of military and cosmic disasters
235(2)
133 Rica to ***. A monastery library; the monk and the refectory bell
237(1)
134 Rica to the same. The library: books concerned with religion
238(1)
135 Rica to the same. The library: various sciences; an argument about astrology
239(2)
136 Rica to the same. The library: national histories
241(2)
137 Rica to the same. The library: works of literature
243(1)
138 Rica to Ibben. Financial policy in France: its changeability, complexity, and bizarre social consequences
244(2)
139 Rica to the same. Greatness of character in two queens of Sweden
246(1)
140 Rica to Usbek. The Parlement of Paris exiled; duties of Parlements to king and people
246(1)
141 Rica to the same. Two stories: Anals in Paradise, and the two Ibrahims
247(7)
142 Rica to Usbek. A letter from an antiquarian scholar; a mythological fragment about the son of Aeolus
254(4)
Letter 143 Rica to Nathaniel Levi. Arguments against magic spells; a letter from a doctor on curing insomnia by reading; prescriptions following the same principle
258(6)
144 Usbek to Rica. Conceit and modesty
264(1)
145 Usbek to ***. The social disadvantages of an intellectual; a letter from a scientist; the risks of publishing
265(3)
146 Usbek to Rhedi. The degradation of a nation by a finance minister
268(2)
147 The Chief Eunuch to Usbek. Faults committed by Usbek's wives
270(1)
148 Usbek to the First Eunuch. Orders to investigate without pity
271(1)
149 Narsit to Usbek. Death of the Chief Eunuch
271(1)
150 Usbek to Narsit. Reiteration of his orders
272(1)
151 Solim to Usbek. Usbek's wives suspected of infidelity
272(2)
152 Narsit to Usbek. Assurances that all is well; loss of a letter from Usbek
274(1)
153 Usbek to Solim. Orders to avenge his honour
274(1)
154 Usbek to his wives. Appointment of Solim as Chief Eunuch
275(1)
155 Usbek to Nessir. Anxieties about the seraglio and fears of what he will find on his return
275(1)
156 Roxana to Usbek. Protests at Solim's measures
276(1)
157 Zashi to Usbek. Protests at being punished by Solim
277(1)
158 Zelis to Usbek. Protests at Usbek's orders
278(1)
159 Solim to Usbek. Roxana's infidelity and the death of her lover
279(1)
Letter 160 Solim to Usbek. Decision to punish
280(1)
161 Roxana to Usbek. Her true feelings for Usbek; her revenge on the eunuchs and her suicide
280(3)
Montesquieu's 'Some Reflections on the Persian Letters' (1754)
283(2)
Appendix: Letters' and fragments not published by Montesquieu 285(16)
Notes 301

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