×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Personality Disorders and the Five-Factor Model of Personality
     

Personality Disorders and the Five-Factor Model of Personality

by Paul T. Costa Jr. (Editor), Thomas A. Widiger (Editor)
 

In the upcoming fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the major innovation for the personality disorders will likely be a shift from the classic syndrome-based approach to a dimensional description approach. This book explains how personality disorders can be understood from the

Overview

In the upcoming fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the major innovation for the personality disorders will likely be a shift from the classic syndrome-based approach to a dimensional description approach. This book explains how personality disorders can be understood from the perspective of the Five-Factor Model (FFM), the most heavily researched and empirically supported dimensional model of general personality structure. Since the second edition of this authoritative text was published in 2002, the research base supporting the FFM has more than quadrupled. As a result, the vast majority of this volume is new. The chapters summarize the conceptual and empirical support for the FFM, including the dimensional description of specific personality disorders and the application of the model for assessment and treatment. Case studies are also provided.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Christopher J Graver, PhD, ABPP-CN(Madigan Healthcare System)
Description: The five-factor model of personality is not a new concept, but it has been slow to gain traction through no fault of the copious literature available to support it. This book is an attempt to further describe and educate readers about this model and its applicability to normal and pathological personality structure.
Purpose: This third edition is meant to update a decade of new research on the topic.
Audience: It is intended mainly for psychologists and psychiatrists, but could appeal to other allied behavioral health clinicians and researchers. The authors are well versed in the topic.
Features: The decision to link the importance of this book to DSM-V changes is unfortunate because it is erroneous. Even the dust jacket description mentions a likely change in DSM-V to a dimensional model of personality, which was merely a supposition by the authors and is not actually going to happen. Despite this presumption, the book is worthwhile. It begins with an introduction to and a discussion of the problems with the current classification system, illustrated through case examples. It takes a developmental approach, with childhood antecedents to personality disorders and explores their cross-cultural nature. After presenting the empirical support for the five-factor model, the second section of the book provides a more detailed investigation of how the model fits particular patient populations. Some chapters have cases with NEO profiles, while others do not. This is a shortcoming in editorial organization, as each chapter could have benefited from this type of information, providing consistency across chapters to give readers an idea of what to expect. There is a balanced discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of current measures for assessing personality traits, as well as informant reports. The final section provides salient guidance about how personality assessment and models can be used for treatment planning and particular treatment selection. As expected, there are many new references since the second edition that expand our understanding of this model.
Assessment: For clinicians and personality researchers, this book provides great insight into cutting-edge models of personality and helps to effect a paradigm shift in our understanding of both normal personality and personality disorders.
Booknews
Leading researchers and clinicians explore the premise that the Five- Factor Model (FFM) of personality is the most useful and comprehensive taxonomy for assessing and describing personality disorders. Although the FFM has already been productively applied to the study of normal personality, it is now proposed as an alternative, conceptually useful framework for understanding personality disorders. The 21 chapters are arranged in five major sections: conceptual background; empirical research; patient populations and clinical cases; treatment of personality-disordered patients; and reconceptualization. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781433811661
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Publication date:
09/28/2012
Pages:
496
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews