Persuasion

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Overview

Twenty-seven-year old Anne Elliot is Austen's most adult heroine. Eight years before the story proper begins, she is happily betrothed to a naval officer, Frederick Wentworth, but she precipitously breaks off the engagement when persuaded by her friend Lady Russell that such a match is unworthy. The breakup produces in Anne a deep and long-lasting regret. When later Wentworth returns from sea a rich and successful captain, he finds Anne's family on the brink of financial ruin and his own sister a tenant in ...
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Overview

Twenty-seven-year old Anne Elliot is Austen's most adult heroine. Eight years before the story proper begins, she is happily betrothed to a naval officer, Frederick Wentworth, but she precipitously breaks off the engagement when persuaded by her friend Lady Russell that such a match is unworthy. The breakup produces in Anne a deep and long-lasting regret. When later Wentworth returns from sea a rich and successful captain, he finds Anne's family on the brink of financial ruin and his own sister a tenant in Kellynch Hall, the Elliot estate. Al the tension of the novel revolves around one question: Will Anne and Wentworth be reunited in their love?

Jane Austin once compared her writing to painting on a little bit of ivory, 2 inches square. Readers of Persuasion will discover that neither her skill for delicate, ironic observations on social custom, love, and marriage nor her ability to apply a sharp focus lens to English manners and morals has deserted her in her final finished work.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Stevenson has read all of Austen's novels for audiobook, in abridged or unabridged versions, and her experience shows in this delightful production. Though dominated by the intelligent, sweet voice of Anne Elliot-the least favored but most worthy of three daughters in a family with an old name but declining fortunes-Stevenson provides other characters with memorable voices as well. She reads Anne's haughty father's lines with a mixture of stuffiness and bluster, and Anne's sisters are portrayed with a hilariously flighty, breathy register that makes Austen's contempt for them palpable. Anne's voice is mostly measured and reasonable-an expression of her strong mind and spirit-but Stevenson imbues her speech with wonderful shades of passion as Anne is reacquainted with Capt. Wentworth, whom she has continued to love despite being forced, years before, to reject him over status issues. Listening to Stevenson, as Anne, describe a sudden encounter with Wentworth, one hardly needs Austen's description of how Anne grows faint-Stevenson's perfectly judged and deeply felt reading has already shown that she must have. Even those who have read Austen's novels will find themselves loving this book all over again with Stevenson's evocative rendition ringing richly in their ears. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal
Austen is the hot property of the entertainment world with new feature film versions of Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility on the silver screen and Pride and Prejudice hitting the TV airwaves on PBS. Such high visibility will inevitably draw renewed interest in the original source materials. These new Modern Library editions offer quality hardcovers at affordable prices.
From the Publisher
"The excellent recent Cambridge University Press edition...is in all a work of outstanding scholarship. In addition to the text of the novel, it includes an extensive 62 page Introduction, a seven page Chronology, 59 pages of Explanatory Notes, the 'Biographical Notice of the Author' by Austen's brother Henry (which had appeared in the original publication), a transcript of the cancelled chapters of Persuasion plus a facsimile of the manuscript of the cancelled chapters. Jane Austen scholars, in particular, will be grateful for this abundance of material gathered together in one place, and will appreciate the opportunity to compare the cancelled chapters with the final published text."
Sensibilities, Beth Hanley
Claudia L. Johnson Princeton University
"Linda Bree has done a marvelous job in this superb new edition of Persuasion. The searching introduction, the informative notes, and most of all the illuminating selection of contextual material make Austen's well-known masterpiece come alive again as a compelling and unsettling new text. Bree clarifies subtleties of class structure, social criticism, and manners that elude many North American as well as British students. Newcomers and longtime admirers of this novel will find much to learn from and enjoy here. All in all, Bree's edition deepens and enriches our understanding of Persuasion. An impressive and admirable achievement!"
Catherine Ingrassia Virginia Commonwealth University
"This splendid edition is ideal for both the student and the scholar of Austen. Always one of Austen's most fascinating novels, Persuasion is made eminently teachable and readable with this wonderful edition; reading it made me want to teach the novel again, soon, just so I can take advantage of Bree's fine work."
Children's Literature - Sarah Maury Swan
Twenty-seven year old Ann Elliot bemoans having denied herself true love when she was 19 to satisfy her father's objections. Now she is stuck, unloved, with a pompous, spendthrift father, equally uncaring older sister, and a broken heart. But her heart's desire comes back into her life, now a wealthy and successful British Navy Captain, only to woo eligible daughters of Elliott family friends. After many twists and turns, including the alarming advances by her cousin—the heir to her father's estate—Ann is reunited with her love. Ms. Austen's gentle sneering at upper crust snobbishness has always been a delight and there is a good romance—though not as steamy as in a modern novel—to read about in her books. The publisher has included some quizzes at the end of the book, as an enticement for modern girls to help them relate to the book. The writing is a bit stilted, but the reader will come away with a look into upper class English society of the nineteenth century and be happy that Ann and her Captain Wentworth end up together. Reviewer: Sarah Maury Swan
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781444732559
  • Publisher: Murray, John Publishers, Limited
  • Publication date: 11/28/2011
  • Sales rank: 844,678

Meet the Author

Jane Austen, née le 16 décembre 1775 à Steventon, dans le Hampshire en Angleterre et morte le 18 juillet 1817 à Winchester, dans le même comté, est une femme de lettres anglaise. Son réalisme, sa critique sociale mordante et sa maîtrise du discours indirect libre, son humour décalé et son ironie ont fait d'elle l'un des écrivains anglais les plus largement lus et aimés.

Toute sa vie, Jane Austen demeure au sein d'une cellule familiale étroitement unie, appartenant à la petite gentry anglaise2. Elle doit son éducation en grande partie à son père et à ses frères aînés, ainsi qu'à ses propres lectures. Le soutien sans faille de sa famille est essentiel pour son évolution en tant qu'écrivain professionnel. L'apprentissage artistique de Jane Austen s'étend du début de son adolescence jusqu'à sa vingt-cinquième année environ. Durant cette période, elle s'essaie à différentes formes littéraires, y compris le roman épistolaire qu'elle expérimente avant de l'abandonner, et écrit et retravaille profondément trois romans majeurs, tout en en commençant un quatrième. De 1811 à 1816, avec la parution de Sense and Sensibility (publié de façon anonyme en 1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) et Emma (1816), elle connaît le succès. Deux autres romans, Northanger Abbey (achevé en fait dès 1803) et Persuasion, font tous deux l'objet d'une publication posthume en 1818 ; en janvier 1817, elle commence son dernier roman, finalement intitulé Sanditon, qu'elle ne peut achever avant sa mort.

Biography

In 1801, George Austen retired from the clergy, and Jane, Cassandra, and their parents took up residence in Bath, a fashionable town Jane liked far less than her native village. Jane seems to have written little during this period. When Mr. Austen died in 1805, the three women, Mrs. Austen and her daughters, moved first to Southampton and then, partly subsidized by Jane's brothers, occupied a house in Chawton, a village not unlike Jane's first home. There she began to work on writing and pursued publishing once more, leading to the anonymous publication of Sense and Sensibility in 1811 and Pride and Prejudice in 1813, to modestly good reviews.

Known for her cheerful, modest, and witty character, Jane Austen had a busy family and social life, but as far as we know very little direct romantic experience. There were early flirtations, a quickly retracted agreement to marry the wealthy brother of a friend, and a rumored short-lived attachment -- while she was traveling -- that has not been verified. Her last years were quiet and devoted to family, friends, and writing her final novels. In 1817 she had to interrupt work on her last and unfinished novel, Sanditon, because she fell ill. She died on July 18, 1817, in Winchester, where she had been taken for medical treatment. After her death, her novels Northanger Abbey and Persuasion were published, together with a biographical notice, due to the efforts of her brother Henry. Austen is buried in Winchester Cathedral.

Author biography courtesy of Barnes & Noble Books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      December 16, 1775
    2. Place of Birth:
      Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
    1. Date of Death:
      July 18, 1817
    2. Place of Death:
      Winchester, Hampshire, England
    1. Education:
      Taught at home by her father

Read an Excerpt

Sir Walter Elliot, of Kellynch Hall, in Somersetshire, was a man who, for his own amusement, never took up any book but the Baronetage; there he found occupation for an idle hour, and consolation in a distressed one; there his faculties were roused into admiration and respect by contemplating the limited remnant of the earliest patents; there any unwelcome sensations arising from domestic affairs changed naturally into pity and contempt as he turned over the almost endless creations of the last century; and there, if every other leaf were powerless, he could read his own history with an interest which never failed. This was the page at which the favourite volume always opened:--

'ELLIOT OF KELLYNCH HALL'

'Walter Elliot, born March 1, 1760, married July 15, 1784, Elizabeth, daughter of James Stevenson, Esq., of South Park, in the county of Gloucester; by which lady (who died 1800) he has issue, Elizabeth, born June 1, 1785; Anne, born August 9, 1787; a still-born son, November 5, 1789; Mary, born November 20, 1791.'

Precisely such had the paragraph originally stood from the printer's hands; but Sir Walter had improved it by adding, for the information of himself and his family, these words, after the date of Mary's birth:--'Married, December 16, 1810, Charles, son and heir of Charles Musgrove, Esq., of Uppercross, in the county of Somerset,' and by inserting most accurately the day of the month on which he had lost his wife.

Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable family in the usual terms; how it had been first settled in Cheshire, how mentioned in Dugdale, serving the office of high sheriff, representing a borough in threesuccessive parliaments, exertions of loyalty, and dignity of baronet, in the first year of Charles II with all the Marys and Elizabeths they had married; forming altogether two handsome quarto pages, and concluding with the arms and motto:--'Principal seat, Kellynch Hall, in the county of Somerset,' and Sir Walter's handwriting again in this finale:--

'Heir presumptive, William Walter Elliot, Esq., great-grandson of the second Sir Walter.'

'Vanity was the beginning and end of Sir Walter Elliot's character: vanity of person and of situation. He had been remarkably handsome in his youth, and at fifty-four was still a very fine man. Few women could think more of their personal appearance than he did, nor could the valet of any new-made lord be more delighted with the place he held in society. He considered the blessing of beauty as inferior only to the blessing of a baronetcy; and the Sir Walter Elliot, who united these gifts, was the constant object of his warmest respect and devotion.

His good looks and his rank had one fair claim on his attachment, since to them he must have owed a wife of very superior character to anything deserved by his own. Lady Elliot had been an excellent woman, sensible and amiable, whose judgment and conduct, if they might be pardoned the youthful infatuation which made her Lady Elliot, had never required indulgence afterwards. She had humoured, or softened, or concealed his failings, and promoted his real respectability for seventeen years; and though not the very happiest being in the world herself, had found enough in her duties, her friends, and her children, to attach her to life, and make it no matter of indifference to her when she was called on to quit them. Three girls, the two eldest sixteen and fourteen, was an awful legacy for a mother to bequeath, an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance of a conceited, silly father. She had, however, one very intimate friend, a sensible, deserving woman, who had been brought, by strong attachment to herself, to settle close by her, in the village of Kellynch; and on her kindness and advice Lady Elliot mainly relied for the best help and maintenance of the good principles and instruction which she had been anxiously giving her daughters.

This friend and Sir Walter did not marry, whatever might have been anticipated on that head by their acquaintance. Thirteen years had passed away since Lady Elliot's death, and they were still near neighbours and intimate friends, and one remained a widower, the other a widow.

That Lady Russell, of steady age and character, and extremely well provided for, should have no thought of a second marriage, needs no apology to the public, which is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not; but Sir Walter's continuing in singleness requires explanation. Be it known, then, that Sir Walter, like a good father (having met with one or two private disappointments in very unreasonable applications), prided himself on remaining single for his dear daughter's sake. For one daughter, his eldest, he would really have given up anything, which he had not been very much tempted to do. Elizabeth had succeeded at sixteen to all that was possible of her mother's rights and consequence; and being very handsome, and very like himself, her influence had always been great, and they had gone on together most happily. His two other children were of very inferior value. Mary had acquired a little artificial importance by becoming Mrs. Charles Musgrove; but Anne, with an elegance of mind and sweetness of character, which must have placed her high with any people of real understanding, was nobody with either father or sister; her word had no weight, her convenience was always to give way--she was only Anne.

To Lady Russell, indeed, she was a most dear and highly valued goddaughter, favourite, and friend. Lady Russell loved them all, but it was only in Anne that she could fancy the mother to revive again.

A few years before Anne Elliot had been a very pretty girl, but her bloom had vanished early; and as, even in its height, her father had found little to admire in her (so totally different were her delicate features and mild dark eyes from his own), there could be nothing in them, now that she was faded and thin, to excite his esteem. He had never indulged much hope, he had now none, of ever reading her name in any other page of his favourite work. All equality of alliance must rest with Elizabeth, for Mary had merely connected herself with an old country family of respectability and large fortune, and had, therefore, given all the honour and received none: Elizabeth would, one day or other, marry suitably.

It sometimes happens that a woman is handsomer at twenty-nine than she was ten years before; and, generally speaking, if there has been neither ill-health nor anxiety, it is a time of life at which scarcely any charm is lost. It was so with Elizabeth, still the same handsome Miss Elliot that she had begun to be thirteen years ago, and Sir Walter might be excused, therefore, in forgetting her age, or, at least, be deemed only half a fool, for thinking himself and Elizabeth as blooming as ever, amidst the wreck of the good looks of everybody else; for he could plainly see how old all the rest of his family and acquaintance were growing. Anne haggard, Mary coarse, every face in the neighbourhood worsting, and the rapid increase of the crow's foot about Lady Russell's temples had long been a distress to him.

Elizabeth did not quite equal her father in personal contentment.

Thirteen years had seen her mistress of Kellynch Hall, presiding and directing with a self-possession and decision which could never have given the idea of her being younger than she was. For thirteen years had she been doing the honours, and laying down the domestic law at home, and leading the way to the chaise and four, and walking immediately after Lady Russell out of all the drawing-rooms and dining-rooms in the country. Thirteen winters' revolving frosts had seen her opening every ball of credit which a scanty neighbourhood afforded, and thirteen springs shown their blossoms, as she travelled up to London with her father, for a few weeks' annual enjoyment of the great world. She had the remembrance of all this, she had the consciousness of being nine-and-twenty to give her some regrets and some apprehensions; she was fully satisfied of being still quite as handsome as ever, but she felt her approach to the years of danger, and would have rejoiced to be certain of being properly solicited by baronet-blood within the next twelvemonth or two. Then might she again take up the book of books with as much enjoyment as in her early youth, but now she liked it not. Always to be presented with the date of her own birth and see no marriage follow but that of a youngest sister, made the book an evil; and more than once, when her father had left it open on the table near her, had she closed it, with averted eyes, and pushed it away.

She had had a disappointment, moreover, which that book and especially the history of her own family, must ever present the remembrance of. The heir presumptive, the very William Walter Elliot, Esq., whose rights had been so generally supported by her father, had disappointed her.

She had, while a very young girl, as soon as she had known him to be, in the event of her having no brother, the future baronet, meant to marry him, and her father had always meant that she should. He had not been known to them as a boy; but soon after Lady Elliot's death, Sir Walter had sought the acquaintance, and though his overtures had not been met with any warmth, he had persevered in seeking it, making allowance for the modest drawing-back of youth; and, in one of their spring excursions to London, when Elizabeth was in her first bloom, Mr. Elliot had been forced into the introduction.

He was at that time a very young man, just engaged in the study of the law; and Elizabeth found him extremely agreeable, and every plan in his favour was confirmed. He was invited to Kellynch Hall; he was talked of and expected all the rest of the year; but he never came. The following spring he was seen again in town, found equally agreeable, again encouraged, invited, and expected, and again he did not come; and the next tidings were that he was married. Instead of pushing his fortune in the line marked out for the heir of the house of Elliot, he had purchased independence by uniting himself to a rich woman of inferior birth.

Sir Walter had resented it. As the head of the house, he felt that he ought to have been consulted, especially after taking the young man so publicly by the hand; 'For they must have been seen together,' he observed, 'once at Tattersalls, and twice in the lobby of the House of Commons.' His disapprobation was expressed, but apparently very little regarded. Mr. Elliot had attempted no apology, and shown himself as unsolicitous of being longer noticed by the family, as Sir Walter considered him unworthy of it: all acquaintance between them had ceased.

This very awkward history of Mr. Elliot was still, after an interval of several years, felt with anger by Elizabeth, who had liked the man for himself, and still more for being her father's heir, and whose strong family pride could see only in him a proper match for Sir Walter Elliot's eldest daughter. There was not a baronet from A to Z whom her feelings could have so willingly acknowledged as an equal. Yet so miserably had he conducted himself, that though she was at this present time (the summer of 1814) wearing black ribbons for his wife, she could not admit him to be worth thinking of again. The disgrace of his first marriage might, perhaps, as there was no reason to suppose it perpetuated by offspring, have been got over, had he not done worse; but he had, as by the accustomary intervention of kind friends they had been informed, spoken most disrespectfully of them all, most slightingly and contemptuously of the very blood he belonged to, and the honours which were hereafter to be his own. This could not be pardoned.
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Table of Contents

Introduction
Persuasion 3
The Original Ending of Persuasion 185
Notes 107
Reading Group Guide 203
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Reading Group Guide

1. Lady Russell persuades Anne to break off her engagement to avoid
"youth-killing dependence." Does she ultimately succeed in sheltering Anne from this?

2. Persuasion is the aim of rhetoric, yet in this book it often hinders lives and harms feelings. What is Austen commenting on? Consider what happens when Lady Russell or Mrs. Clay persuade others as opposed to what happens when Anne persuades others.

3. Look at how Anne's feelings and perceptions are shown-never through her direct words or thoughts but through an approximate report of these through a distant narrator. What does Austen accomplish by doing this?

4. Consider how sailors such as Wentworth and Admiral Croft have made their fortunes-by capturing enemy ships and enjoying the spoils. With their newfound wealth, they re-join English society in higher social standings. What is Austen's opinion of this? In what ways and situations does she relay this opinion?

5. Many of Austen's earlier works take place in the spring, but this story plays out in autumn. Very often, the characters and narrator notice the colorful leaves and cool air around them. How does the season promote this story?

6. The narrator describes the Christmas scene at the Musgroves' as a "fine-family piece." What is Austen implying with her sarcasm? Do you think she is antifamily?

7. Admiral and Mrs. Croft have the most successful and loving relationship in the novel, even though they are unromantic, eccentric, and deeply rooted in realism. Yet many of the idyllic lovers look to their marriage as a model. What is Austen commenting upon with this ironic reversal?

8. Mr. Elliot is the catalyst forthe reunion of Anne and Captain Wentworth, provoking jealousy in Wentworth, which in turn prompts him to reconsider his love for Anne. However, Austen chooses not merely to make Mr. Elliot Anne's unwanted lover but instead to reveal him as a rich and immoral scoundrel, to be cast out of the story. What does Austen accomplish by doing this? What is she saying about the world of property and rank?

9. Compare the original ending chapters and the "real" ending chapters. Why did Austen make these changes? What did she accomplish with them?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 506 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 509 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    Truly Tremendous

    Persuasion is a powerful book that strongly impacts the mind of any reader. I read this book for a research paper I had to write this year in high school, and I fell in love with it. Apart from the fact that I experienced the emotions described in this book, Jane Austen presents the material in such a way that the reader can comprehend, and fully grasp, the struggle of Captain Wentworth and Anne Elliot. This is truly a tremendous masterpiece. I strongly recommend it.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2011

    Great Book, Ok, Formatting

    This is one of my all time favorite books. I have read it several times in paperback and after having to sell almost all of my books for a move I was excited to see this free version. The formatting is fairly decent. There are random numbers and letters throughout and some of the line breaks are odd but it's not hard to read and really isn't annoying. Some of the paragraphs run on but that was how my other copy of the book was. I could be coming from a different perspective on the reason the formatting really doesn't bother me. I was a history major and some of the things that I had to read from this time period (and others) were not edited for ease of reading. Good copy if you are interested in reading it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 22, 2010

    A great book once you get into it!!

    I will not lie; Persuasion is a book that took me a really long time to get into. This book is what we would classify as a "chick flick" but in book form (so for all the real men in the world read this book). The only thing that kept me reading it for the longest time was that I had read the inside cover and was intrigued with what could happen in this book. This book is about two hundred years old so the text used can be somewhat confusing at times. The spelling is definitely different along with the grammar use. During this book the reader will experience drama, sadness, jealousy, happiness, shock, and many more emotions. The story first takes place in what I assumed to be England. The war had just finished and many army personnel were coming home. One part that I had a really hard time understanding was the very beginning, it seemed like the narrator was the father of Anne Elliot. He seems to be trying to write his will or making an autobiography of himself. I could not figure out who the narrator was or what they were trying to tell the reader. After I got past that part I just had to keep telling myself to keep on reading because it would get better. When Anne (the main character) first comes across her long lost love Captain Wentworth the reader wants them to just get back together and for everything to be good. Fortunately, that does not happen and the reader has more to read. Later in the book Anne meets her cousin Mr. Elliot and they soon become acquainted with one another. I did not know if I wanted them to get married or if I still wanted Captain Wentworth to come back and marry Anne. The setting of this book wanted to make me have a English accent and begin telling parts of this story to some of my friends. It is a story that has its ups and downs but it definitely a phenomenal book with a wonderful ending that I will not give away. This book is a book that you could read in book clubs, on rainy days, give as a gift, and should have in a library. Once I got to the end of this book I wanted it to keep going on. The way that Anne now feels about love and about Captain Wentworth may be a tear jerker for some so make sure to keep some tissues handy. The ending will make the reader go back in time and switch places with Anne if the reader is female. Another thing about this book is that it is one of the all time classics and if modified could easily apply to this day in age. This is a book that I am definitely giving a thumbs up and recommending to my friends because of how well if rapped up and did not leave you hanging. I loved this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2014

    Enjoyable and satisfying

    A great satirical description of class prejudice and privilege. The virtuous overcome the contemptible and the reader is happy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2014

    Great Austen novel

    It is a pleasure to. read or to rereadan. Austen nvell,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2014

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    Comong soon...

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    Posted May 21, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2014

    Fancy

    Bio will be up when i have the time!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2014

    Tiger

    Crush is Swift.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 24, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Swift

    Name.swift or swiftkit gender tom age 6 moons apperence. A black and white patched with green eyes speckled with gold and has really long legs. Crush none history ask symbol"_"

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Tiger

    Tiger she kit orange with black stripes stormy gray eyes siggy: &#8729&#8710&#8729

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    &nu&sigma&real&kappa&upsilon&tau&alpha

    Name • Vorkuta<br>
    Rank • med and assassin<br>
    Gender • femme<br>
    Personality • seems angry often, and often is, and attacks anyone and anything. She is also a good friend to have if you can get her on your side<br>
    Themesongs • John Doe, Bob et Priscilla et Laterns, Birds of Tokyo<br>
    Siggies • &nu&sigma&real&kappa&upsilon&tau&alpha et &upsilon<_>•&upsilon<br>
    Other • mdr means morte de real means dying of laughter, so basically lol or lmfao. You choose. I also say 'duck' instead of
    'f<_>uck' because I can. Plus i talk alot of French so you may need to ask for some translations. I also post only two stars. Now, bai!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Mirror

    Age: unkown. Gender: she cat. Personality: she is intelligent and cunning but hardly talks to others. Looks: silver fur with grey eyes that have gold flecs. Crush: no. History: nothing that should concern you.~

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Silence

    Name:Silence ~
    Female~
    Rank:Assasin
    Apperence: A grey-white furred she cat which fur has a hint of red from stained blood. When she closes her eyes and mouth it looks like there sewn shut.
    Crush:No Love aloud
    Themesong: The Darkness by Hardstyle
    Symbol: #-#

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Small kit's bio

    Name: Has none
    <br>Rank: Kit
    <br>Gender: &female
    <br>Appearance: Ginger/scarlet pelt covered with gashes and blood, one silver eye, the other eye is to clawed to resemble anything
    <br>Mark: O_X
    <br>
    <br>Ask about anything else!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Mystery

    Name: Mystery .. Gender: Female .. Age: unknown .. Color: pure black with one white ear .. Eyes: dark grey almost black .. Personality: Unknown .. Kin: Dark brother rest unknown .. Theme Song: Riot by three days grace .. Siggy: ~.~

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    Finch's bio

    Name: Finch•••Appearance: Pure black with bloodstained claws that are always unsheathed. Purple grey eyes.•••Sign: {}_{}•••Rank: Assassin.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    Quest's Bio

    Name: Quest--- Rank: Assassin---Looks: pure white she-cat with stripes of stained blood of her mother and father---Symbol: []_[] &#9813

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    Birchkit's Biography

    Name: Birchkit.<br>Gender: Male.<br>Looks: He is a very small, even for his age, light coloured tabby. His main coat is tanish and the stripes are a slightly darker tan. His eyes are light blue.<br>Personality: Easily distracted, childish.<br>Kin: Waspkit, Breezekit, Woolkit, Zenia, Digger, etc<br>Mark: ~†~

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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