Perversion of Justice: A Southern Tragedy of Murder, Lies and Innocence Betrayed

Overview

A startling look inside one of the most fascinating cases of last year––the murder of Terry King, the conviction of his 12 and 13–year old sons, and the pedophile who was accused of being an accessory.

On November 26, 2001, Terry King was found dead in his recliner in his home in Pensacola, Florida. Though a fire had been set in an attempt to cover up the scene, the evidence was indisputable––he had been beaten to death with a baseball bat. Days later, King's two young sons, 12 ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $105.00   
  • Used (20) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$105.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(217)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

A startling look inside one of the most fascinating cases of last year––the murder of Terry King, the conviction of his 12 and 13–year old sons, and the pedophile who was accused of being an accessory.

On November 26, 2001, Terry King was found dead in his recliner in his home in Pensacola, Florida. Though a fire had been set in an attempt to cover up the scene, the evidence was indisputable––he had been beaten to death with a baseball bat. Days later, King's two young sons, 12 and 13 and not even five feet tall each, were found hiding out in the mobile home of their close friend, Rick Chavis, a convicted pedophile who had recently become very close to 12–year old Alex. In parallel statements, Alex and Derek confessed to murdering their father, and soon, they became the two youngest people ever to stand on trial for murder in the state of Florida.

But in a startling twist, the prosecution decided to do the unprecedented––try the boys for murder in one trial and Rick Chavis for murder in another, despite the boys' confessions. And in a case that gripped the state of Florida and hit headlines across the nation, convictions came down and were soon overturned. But in the end, the case became a series of missed opportunities, stunning reversals, and one of the most riveting true crime stories of the last decade.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060549299
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/25/2004
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

Kathryn Medico lives in South Florida and teaches writing classes.

Mollye Barrows is a news anchor and reporter for the ABC affiliate in Pensacola, Florida.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

A Perversion of Justice

A Southern Tragedy of Murder, Lies and Innocence Betrayed
By Medico, Kathryn

Avon Books

ISBN: 0060549297

Chapter One

Brandon Beecher's training at the Santa Rosa Fire Academy had taught him that every house fire held potential victims, even if neighbors insisted that no one was home. For Beecher, the searching procedure never changed.

After all, neighbors had been wrong before. In a fire several years back, Beecher rescued a teenager in a "vacant" house. The runaway had found a safe place to hide, and in trying to keep warm, accidently set the house on fire and became trapped. Beecher found the frightened girl huddling in a corner, surrounded by flames, and he guided her outside to safety.

Now, in the early morning hours of November 26, 2001, Beecher entered Terry King's burning home and calmly began his routine search for victims. He was "patting" the sofa when his hand hit an object resting on the arm of the couch. Unable to see in the dark, smoky room, he gingerly groped what his hand had bumped, and an icy chill ran up his spine. He was grasping a human foot.

He jerked his hand away and then raised his heavy flashlight. Its beam fell on a gruesome sight. Terry King seemed relaxed, sitting in a chair with his hands folded across his stomach, a coffee cup next to his leg. Even the expression on the small man's face was serene and would have appeared normal except the right side of his forehead had a fist-sized hole in it. Blood had flowed down King's face, drying in streaks. The heavy smoke clung to his wounds and blackened the blood, warping the forty-year-old's features like some gruesome Halloween mask. Stifling an urge to scream, Beecher took a deep breath, pushed the button on his radio and shakily reported his finding.

It was obvious to Beecher that Terry King's injuries had nothing to do with the fire, and he had a very disturbing thought: If the dad was in this condition, what did the children look like?

Although the fire burned forty percent of the house, what remained still held clues as to what happened on that mysterious evening of November 25. After the last flames in the back bedrooms were doused, firefighters began venting the enormous accumulation of black smoke. As the cloud cleared they saw the signs of a house with children. Toys were left where small hands had dropped them, piles of kids' laundry were not yet put away. There were boxes of Christmas decorations lying open -- ornaments waiting for hooks, an angel ready to ascend to the top of a tree. Strings of lights were being untangled to hang outside the humble home, all in preparation for a Christmas celebration that would never come.

The firefighters found no sign of the young boys Ed Harris had reported were home that night. Relieved there were no more bodies, their spirits lifted a bit.

"Missing children sure beat dead ones," someone commented.

At first the firefighters thought Terry King had been shot in the head. Broken bone fragments framed the gaping hole, looking like the damage left behind in the wake of a bullet, but they could find no entry wound. Behind the chair where Terry sat was a floor lamp. Blood was splattered on the lampshade, the walls, and the ceiling.

In strange contrast to the violent head wound, Terry's last moments of life appeared to have been very peaceful. His hands were folded in his lap and a full cup of coffee rested between his leg and the chair. His moccasin-clad feet were propped up on the arm of his couch as though he had fallen asleep watching his favorite television show. But Terry King didn't own a television. He didn't want his boys exposed to too much violence.

Continues...

Excerpted from A Perversion of Justice by Medico, Kathryn Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

A Perversion of Justice
A Southern Tragedy of Murder, Lies and Innocence Betrayed

Chapter One

Brandon Beecher's training at the Santa Rosa Fire Academy had taught him that every house fire held potential victims, even if neighbors insisted that no one was home. For Beecher, the searching procedure never changed.

After all, neighbors had been wrong before. In a fire several years back, Beecher rescued a teenager in a "vacant" house. The runaway had found a safe place to hide, and in trying to keep warm, accidently set the house on fire and became trapped. Beecher found the frightened girl huddling in a corner, surrounded by flames, and he guided her outside to safety.

Now, in the early morning hours of November 26, 2001, Beecher entered Terry King's burning home and calmly began his routine search for victims. He was "patting" the sofa when his hand hit an object resting on the arm of the couch. Unable to see in the dark, smoky room, he gingerly groped what his hand had bumped, and an icy chill ran up his spine. He was grasping a human foot.

He jerked his hand away and then raised his heavy flashlight. Its beam fell on a gruesome sight. Terry King seemed relaxed, sitting in a chair with his hands folded across his stomach, a coffee cup next to his leg. Even the expression on the small man's face was serene and would have appeared normal except the right side of his forehead had a fist-sized hole in it. Blood had flowed down King's face, drying in streaks. The heavy smoke clung to his wounds and blackened the blood, warping the forty-year-old's features like some gruesome Halloween mask. Stifling an urge to scream, Beecher took a deep breath, pushed the button on his radio and shakily reported his finding.

It was obvious to Beecher that Terry King's injuries had nothing to do with the fire, and he had a very disturbing thought: If the dad was in this condition, what did the children look like?

Although the fire burned forty percent of the house, what remained still held clues as to what happened on that mysterious evening of November 25. After the last flames in the back bedrooms were doused, firefighters began venting the enormous accumulation of black smoke. As the cloud cleared they saw the signs of a house with children. Toys were left where small hands had dropped them, piles of kids' laundry were not yet put away. There were boxes of Christmas decorations lying open -- ornaments waiting for hooks, an angel ready to ascend to the top of a tree. Strings of lights were being untangled to hang outside the humble home, all in preparation for a Christmas celebration that would never come.

The firefighters found no sign of the young boys Ed Harris had reported were home that night. Relieved there were no more bodies, their spirits lifted a bit.

"Missing children sure beat dead ones," someone commented.

At first the firefighters thought Terry King had been shot in the head. Broken bone fragments framed the gaping hole, looking like the damage left behind in the wake of a bullet, but they could find no entry wound. Behind the chair where Terry sat was a floor lamp. Blood was splattered on the lampshade, the walls, and the ceiling.

In strange contrast to the violent head wound, Terry's last moments of life appeared to have been very peaceful. His hands were folded in his lap and a full cup of coffee rested between his leg and the chair. His moccasin-clad feet were propped up on the arm of his couch as though he had fallen asleep watching his favorite television show. But Terry King didn't own a television. He didn't want his boys exposed to too much violence.

A Perversion of Justice
A Southern Tragedy of Murder, Lies and Innocence Betrayed
. Copyright © by Kathryn Medico. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2004

    A Must Read for True Crime Buffs

    Anyone who reads 'Angels of Death' will surely want to read this book to see what the TRUE story. These boys are victims - not criminals!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)