A Pet for Petunia
  • A Pet for Petunia
  • A Pet for Petunia

A Pet for Petunia

5.0 1
by Paul Schmid
     
 

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Meet Petunia.

More than anything, Petunia wants a pet.

“I’ll feed my pet every day,” she promises her parents.“I’ll take her for walks. I’ll read stories to her and draw her pictures.”

Petunia knows she can take care of a pet, but what happens when the pet she most desires is a skunk?

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Overview

Meet Petunia.

More than anything, Petunia wants a pet.

“I’ll feed my pet every day,” she promises her parents.“I’ll take her for walks. I’ll read stories to her and draw her pictures.”

Petunia knows she can take care of a pet, but what happens when the pet she most desires is a skunk?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Extroverted Petunia wears a striped purple jumper and lives a life filled with exclamation points; she "wants wants, wants! a REAL pet skunk." She pleads with her parents, who are never on-camera; it's mostly Petunia's side of the conversation, overheard like half of a cellphone call. Her begging culminates with a rant so impassioned that it fills an entire page with words that start out huge and shrink, line by line, as her protests lose steam: "STINK? How can you say that!...You said no when I wanted a python, too! I bet Katie's parents would get her a skunk." Schmid's (The Wonder Book) line drawings are simple, fluid, and convey lots of valuable information: when Petunia makes a snack for her stuffed skunk, the milk carton on the table leaks where she's ripped it open, betraying her claims of responsible care ("I'll feed my skunk every day. I promise!"). An encounter with a real skunk gets Petunia's mind off pets—briefly. Enthusiastic and single-minded, Petunia makes delightful company; kids will recognize themselves and clamor for rereads. Ages 3�7. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Young Petunia LOVES skunks. She has a beloved toy skunk, but desperately wants a real one. She begs her parents, promising to feed it, walk it, read to it, even clean the litter box. Her parents say no, for an obvious reason: they stink. Petunia carries on indignantly for a page filled with outrage, in print of all sizes, crying, "How can you say that!" Off to the woods she goes. And there, on the path, is a skunk. And guess what she discovers? She runs home, overwhelmed by the stink. She is then happy with her stuffed skunk, at least until she spots "that absolutely, totally, major sweet porcupine!" Black outline cartoon-y drawings with touches of mainly purple paint effectively visualize the temper tantrums and pleadings of our appealing heroine along with few contextual details. Petunia comes across as an authentically charming youngster in this humorous, believable tale that begins on the front end pages, with a glimpse of the skunk soon to appear in the narrative, and ends with an innocent-appearing porcupine near the woods on the back pages. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—Fearless apologist for skunks, Petunia can no longer accept just a stuffed toy, and begs and pleads with her parents for a real one. Precocious as can be, she will not accept the brick wall she hits when her parents' true feelings leak out, and they say no with the simple reason, "They stink." The child relentlessly concludes that her parents are "lunkheads" and decides to run away, plotting, "I'll get eaten by bear. Then they'll let me have my pet skunk." She gets what she deserves when she comes upon a skunk in the woods and experiences firsthand the "awful...horrible...humungous stink!" The illustrations leave much white space for Petunia's personality to soar. The natural, expressive charcoal-rendered lines coupled with accents of purple watercolor (and a bit of complementary orange here and there) suit the story well and add to its sophistication; the typeface is equally expressive. Although the circular ending with the child eyeing a porcupine rings a tad clichéd, the gentle artistry of the skunk, the woods, and the porcupine warm the heart.—Sara Lissa Paulson, American Sign Language and English Lower School PS 347, New York City

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061963315
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/25/2011
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
173,076
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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