Petrograd

Overview

Introducing the untold tale of the international conspiracy behind the murder of Gregorii Rasputin! Set during the height of the first World War, the tale follows a reluctant British spy stationed in the heart of the Russian empire as he is handed the most difficult assignment of his career: orchestrate the death of the mad monk, the Tsarina's most trusted adviser and the surrogate ruler of the nation. The mission will take our hero from the slums of the working class into the opulent houses of the super rich... ...
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Petrograd

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Overview

Introducing the untold tale of the international conspiracy behind the murder of Gregorii Rasputin! Set during the height of the first World War, the tale follows a reluctant British spy stationed in the heart of the Russian empire as he is handed the most difficult assignment of his career: orchestrate the death of the mad monk, the Tsarina's most trusted adviser and the surrogate ruler of the nation. The mission will take our hero from the slums of the working class into the opulent houses of the super rich... he'll have to negotiate dangerous ties with the secret police, navigate the halls of power, and come to terms with own revolutionary leanings, all while simply trying to survive!
Based on historical documents and research, Petrograd is a tense, edge-of-your seat spy thriller, taking the reader on a journey through the background of one of history's most infamous assassinations, set against the backdrop of one of the most tumultuous moments in 20th century history.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
It took conniving Russian aristocrats numerous attempts with poison, knife, gun, fists, and icy water to murder "mad monk" Grigori Rasputin. But the lethal bullet was English, per recent findings. Gelatt fictionalizes the alleged shooter as Cleary, a young British intelligence agent who must supervise this assassination but finds himself an unwilling collaborator. While history presents a nasty-enough thriller to work with, Gelatt's command of character makes this attempt particularly successful. From hapless Cleary to the perverse yet likable nobles, the swaggering chief of the tsar's police, and Cleary's prickly Bolshevik crush, the characters seem to wear their dialog, not just speak it. Their grimy romanticism conjures an unsavory history when nobody had clean hands. VERDICT Gelatt never lets us forget that real people create history, and he asks, What if those people were us? Crook's semirealistic, sepia-washed art lends just the right aura of a dangerous time that we may want to glimpse but certainly not relive. Recommended for history buffs and thriller lovers, as well as a curative for those who think history is boring. With violence and some sexual situations.—M.C.
The Barnes & Noble Review

"Murder is the emperor of political action," says an eager conspirator in the graphic novel Petrograd. In this case the murder is the notorious assassination of Grigori Rasputin, and the political action is a conspiracy orchestrated by agents of the British Secret Service at the height of World War I. Author Philip Gelatt and artist Tyler Crook demythologize the killing of Rasputin — a figure so buried in legend that this task borders on the herculean — largely by substituting a not wholly implausible counter-historical fiction.

Beginning in the trenches of the Eastern Front and ending with the February Revolution, Petrograd is based on enough known facts and real people to credibly capture a sense of time and place, but it also employs just enough fiction to create a compelling (if conventional) spy thriller. It mines a fair amount of tension out of material that's already, in a sense, a matter of history.

There are no real revelations here for anyone with a passing familiarity with history or the spy genre. As a novel it is good, satisfying, but as a comic it is beautiful. Crook's gorgeous sepia- toned artwork creates a palpable atmosphere of a people and a city on the edge while crisply moving the action through carefully constructed panels.

Whether archvillain, debauched madman, or clever charlatan, Rasputin remains largely a mystery in this novel, as he has in real life. He is a cryptic center around which wind the various strands of the Russian aristocracy, the tsar's secret police, and British intelligence. Wary, perhaps, of coming at the enigma of Rasputin too directly, the narrative follows Agent Cleary, an Irish-born agent of the British Crown stationed in St. Petersburg. Cleary's personal and political ambivalence make him a reluctant but effective spy who uses his contacts — including nobles at the top of Russian society and Bolshevik revolutionaries at the bottom — to "facilitate communication between war efforts." As Cleary says, spying on the Russians sometimes means spying for them.

It is to the novel's credit that the conspiracy it invents is not needlessly complicated or baroque. The British fear the Russians will make a separate peace with Germany, and rumors of secret negotiations at the behest of the Russian royal family's "mystic advisor" are seen as the decisive factor. Thus, a comment made as a hypothetical jest by the right person is reported up the chain of command, and Cleary finds himself pressed into making sure that one nobleman's fantasy becomes a reality.

Despite the inherently grandiose and seductive nature of conspiracy theory as a basis for fiction, Petrograd never indulges the assumption that the machinations of empire are by definition omnipotent or all-encompassing. Neither the men who orchestrate events from afar nor those who carry out their plans are ever truly in control of their own actions or their outcomes. This is best captured in the depiction of the killing of Rasputin. As written by Gelatt and vividly illustrated by Crook, the infamously excessive assault that unfolded — the victim was shot, stabbed, poisoned, and thrown into an icy river — was due not to any supernatural hardiness of Rasputin, nor extraordinary malevolence on the part of his killers, but rather the assassins' naïve and inexperience. The romantic notion of changing history by means of some brilliant scheme is quickly replaced by the sordid work of actually killing someone. In the end, the murder accomplishes nothing, as the tide of revolution sweeps away the Romanov dynasty and ends the Russian involvement in the war. In a pattern often repeated throughout history, the only political action that really matters manages to take all the relevant "intelligence" completely by surprise.

Will Menaker is a grad student and freelance writer who has worked for Josh Marshall's Talking Points Memo and RawStory.com. He now shares his thoughts opinions at DearLeaderBlog.blogspot.com.Reviewer: Will Menaker

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781934964446
  • Publisher: Oni Press
  • Publication date: 8/3/2011
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 1,199,436
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

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