Phantom (Alex Hawke Series #7)

( 45 )

Overview

Counterspy Alex Hawke must catch a villainous megalomaniac—a man obsessed with horrifying experiments in cyberwarfare—in this mesmerizing new espionage thriller in Ted Bell's New York Times bestselling series

The first and most bizarre event nearly becomes a monumental catastrophe when something goes awry at an American theme park, wreaking havoc on visitors looking for nothing more than a sun-splashed holiday. In a different part of the country, a USAF F-15 pilot, escorting ...

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Phantom (Alex Hawke Series #7)

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Overview

Counterspy Alex Hawke must catch a villainous megalomaniac—a man obsessed with horrifying experiments in cyberwarfare—in this mesmerizing new espionage thriller in Ted Bell's New York Times bestselling series

The first and most bizarre event nearly becomes a monumental catastrophe when something goes awry at an American theme park, wreaking havoc on visitors looking for nothing more than a sun-splashed holiday. In a different part of the country, a USAF F-15 pilot, escorting another jet in the skies over the Midwest, inexplicably loses control of his plane, endangering the lives of several people and deeply puzzling those following his mission on the ground. Then, in the misty calm of a coastal California evening, the world's premier scientist on the subject of artificial intelligence gets a strange phone call. When he hangs up, he quietly grabs his coat and leaves for an after-dinner stroll from which he never returns.

It's up to Hawke and the brilliant former inspector Ambrose Congreve to find out what could possibly be happening. But how does one identify—and fight—an enemy one can't see, a real phantom? Even these seasoned operatives are mystified. Is there really such a thing as an ultra-intelligent machine, a cyberweapon that can shift the geopolitical balance of power?

In a hunt that takes him from Palo Alto, California, to the Russian frontier, to Cambridge University and the glistening Mediterranean aboard his newly christened and armed super-yacht Blackhawke, Alex Hawke is joined by the unstoppable Stokely Jones and his ex-CIA buddy Harry Brock as he moves closer to unmasking the scientist behind these extraordinary events, going nose-to-nose with an enemy unlike any he's fought before—and may never again.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
At the outset of bestseller Bell’s exciting seventh thriller featuring MI6 agent Alex Hawke (after 2010’s Warlord), Alex learns that his lost love, Anastasia Korsakova, the daughter of the present-day yet recently dead Russian czar, is still alive, held prisoner in a high-security Siberian KGB facility. While Alex fears he’s being lured into a trap, he travels to Siberia, where Anastasia gives him their son, three-year-old Alexi, for safekeeping. Back in England, Alex throws himself into fatherhood while fending off assassins from an organization of Russian hard-liners who blame Alex for the czar’s death. Meanwhile, an Iranian scientist known as Darius has built a computer dubbed Perseus that has almost attained parity with human intelligence. Alex must find Darius and Perseus in order to foil their dastardly plan for humanity. While the two distinct threats make for a sometimes disjointed plot, a terrific, final naval battle shows Alex at his fighting finest. Agent: Peter Lampack, Peter Lampack Agency. (Mar.)
Newbern Sun Journal on Phantom
Phantom is a book you may not want to put down. . . . Hawke is the protagonist of this novel, and he is as cool a customer as this reviewer has run across for some time.
Iron Mountain Daily News on Phantom
“A thoroughly enjoyable spy novel . . . warm weather makes one want to dive into the summer beachside books and Ted Bell’s Phantom is a great start.”
Suspense Magazine on Phantom
“This is a scary book . . . Bell never lets up on the action in this very well written tale. . . . I had to pause to take a breath before seeing what came next.”
The Mystery Gazette on Phantom
“A terrific nonstop action tale . . . Gripping from the vivid Disney World disaster until the final confrontation with a brilliant Phantom.”
Booklist on Phantom
“[Hawke’s] most personal mission yet. . . . the story is tense and exciting. A perfect read for Clive Cussler fans.”
NPR on Warlord
“Hawke is . . . strong, shrewd and savvy, with an aplomb not seen since James Bond. In other words, Bond, eat your heart out . . . there’s a new spy in town.
Rankin Ledger on Phantom
“As enlightening as it is scary. . . . Ted Bell packs so many action-amped scenarios into Alex Hawke’s seventh adventure, it’s so often hard to catch one’s breath. If you crave spy thrills with a Bond on steroids, visit the bloody British world of Ted Bell’s Alex Hawke.”
Library Journal - Audio
The seventh installment in Bell's Alex Hawke series finds the globetrotting British agent attempting to foil an Iranian computer genius who has lost control of the world's most powerful supercomputer. The machine is enlarging its computing capacity on its own and has the capability of taking over other machines—including weapons—giving it the potential to wipe out humanity. While Hawke and American and fellow British agents rush to prevent worldwide destruction, he also battles Russian gangsters bent on killing him, his son, and Russia's president. VERDICT This fast-paced, over-the-top adventure story possesses enough action and colorful characters to hold the listener's attention. Veteran reader John Shea masterfully narrates this wild tale. Recommended for Bell fans and others who like the genre. ["Hawke's seventh adventure (after Warlord) is an action-packed technothriller.... As usual, Bell keeps the tone light and the level of derring-do high," read the review of the Morrow hc, LJ Xpress Reviews, 2/3/12.—Ed.]—Stephen L. Hupp, West Virginia Univ. Parkersburg Lib.
Kirkus Reviews
Strange disasters are occurring around the world. These disasters include the unexplained explosion of ABM missiles in their silos in Alaska and the unlikely sinking of a U.S. cruise ship by a Russian submarine in the Caribbean. The supervillain behind the mishaps is a monolithic supercomputer called Perseus, which sits 2001-like beneath the Persian Gulf. In his latest fanciful globetrotting adventure featuring British counterintelligence star Alex Hawke, Bell (Warlord, 2010, etc.) projects a future in which Artificial Intelligence has advanced to the point where its human creators can only hope to contain it. In fact, Perseus' increasingly nervous quadriplegic inventor, Dr. Darius Saffari, who answers to the government of Iran, can only pretend to control his creation anymore. The world is at risk. Before Hawke can short-circuit the evil black tower, he must survive a dangerous personal mission in Siberia to rescue his true love Anastasia, long thought dead. In a previous adventure, he killed an old-style imperialist ruler embraced as the new Tsar. Here, vengeful soldiers who remain loyal to the Tsar target both Hawke and Alexei, the 3-year-old son he never knew he had.

A long novel that is short on suspense but still keeps the reader involved with its charmingly unflappable hero and narrative quirks, as well as the ease with which it unfolds on multiple continents, on land and sea and in air.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441891402
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 3/20/2012
  • Series: Alex Hawke Series , #7
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Abridged
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Ted Bell is the former chairman of the board and worldwide creative director of Young & Rubicam, one of the world's largest advertising agencies. He is the New York Times bestselling author of Phantom, Warlord, Hawke, Assassin, Pirate, Spy, and Tsar, as well as two YA adventure novels. Bell writes on an island off the coast of Maine.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 45 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 14, 2012

    Silly and Pompous! If you are looking for serious espionage or

    Silly and Pompous!

    If you are looking for serious espionage or a thriller, then this is not the book for you. Alex Hawke runs around playing at being a Jason Bourne or Mitch Rapp. He has assassins chasing him all around yet he walks down LOndon streets w/o protection, drops into MOscow, evades the KgB, pops up in Iranian waters, firing away. HIs new boat only costs 200 million or more, and his son is baby-sat by the Queen. REally? Is this a spoof? Can his high jinxs be any sillier or inplausible? It just goes on and on. I am sorry I wasted my money and time, I can get neither back.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2012

    Phantom

    "This is just the beginning of a whole new kind of war. And I for one don't like it." This book is full of inane dialog and overdone caricatures. And I for one don't like it.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2012

    A Great Addition to the Hawke Legacy

    There are many things that I'm thankful my father has shared with me. An interest in politics, my love of sailing, and my love of the Hawke series, just to name a few. Ted Bell's newest book in the Hawke series, Phantom, is a fine addition that includes all of these things.

    The difficult balance in any "spy thriller" is to create a story that walks the fine line of believability and outlandish. The story must be just slightly beyond what is something you would expect to hear in the news, but not so outlandish that it's downright unbelievable. Ted Bell has hit this mark on the head with Phantom. The character of Hawke has easily been established in previous books. He's a polite, emotionally connected world superstar with the wealth to do as he would like. He has a fortune and skill set that puts Bruce Wayne to shame. He has the connections that James Bond could only dream to have. He knows how to be there emotionally for the ones he loves, yet has no problem putting those emotions aside to get a job done. In spite of all that, he still is respectful of those that he has to bring to their untimely demise. Thanks to his character's establishment in prior books, the "coincidences" and connections he has are all easily explained within his universe. It comes across as believable that he could afford mansions and mega yachts while rubbing shoulders with world leaders. He is surrounded by individuals who have the skill sets to overcome uncomfortable situations.

    Ted Bell has done a masterful job crafting a villain that creates a formidable foe for even Hawke. No stranger to extreme situations, the ultimate foe in Phantom creates situations where the reader will be curious how Hawke and others can overcome. This villain creates an opportunity to evaluate philosophies of Humanism and the potential upsides or downsides of Singularity. What role does Humanity face, both now and in the future? Will current technological advancements in computing present positive or negative opportunities for Humanity? The villain will bring these questions and more to the mind of the reader and force them to be aware of an engage these philosophies. Phantom ends up being more a battle of the minds between Hawke and this villain, a new turn for the series. It is a welcome approach though, keeping the Hawke series fresh and interesting. Don't worry, though, Bell has crafted some of his best action sequences of the series. The contains some thrilling sea battles that had me wanting to head out on my 16' Compac Sailboat and storm the waters of enemies. All of this being said, though, I would have loved to see a little longer of a cat and mouse game between the villain and Hawke and a little less distraction towards the secondary villain.

    Ultimately, Phantom is a welcome addition to the Hawke legacy. I once mentioned to Mr. Bell that, in spite of the fact that I buy my books digitally, there are certain books that I buy an additional hard copy of because I want to be sure I have it around no matter what. Phantom easily falls into this category, and it will join the rest of the Hawke series neatly on my physical shelf.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 28, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Ted Bell draws us in, yet again, to the addictive Alex Hawke series with Phantom. Women love Commander Hawke's boyish charm and men admire his sense of adventure. In Phantom we are priviledged to explore Alex's new found fatherhood. His love of country and his need to fiercely protect his son takes us on a frenetic journey around the world. Phantom exceeds all standards. Spasiba Mr. Bell for inviting us on Alex's latest campaign.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2012

    Outstanding....another page turner....reslly makes you think about Singularity....Thanks TB

    I have read every one of Ted's books. I have even enjoyed reading about Nick McIver with my 11 year old twin boys. I think that his latest book, Phantom, was a gift and testament to his loyal readers. For the first time, he did not waste precious pages on elaborately filling the history of the previous books. He added just the right amount for a new comer, but I feel like people are late for class and the teacher (whose every word your hang on), is starting the lecture over for them! As a result, Phantom hits the ground running. Reminds me of the way the old mail bags used to hang over a train station, even when it did not stop, and get yanked from 0 to 75 mph by the speeding train. That was me, ripped out of my comfy chair from the start. Alex Hawke is better than James Bond! Ted Bell writes and capitalizes on distinct differences between Hawke and Bond. For starters, Bond is a freeloader. He jet sets around the planet on Her Majesty's dime or pound sterling for that matter. He has not skin in the game. In Phantom, he once again gives the reader the lavish James Bond 2.0 version where he has his own wealth. He is single handedly, and realistically I might add, taking on the world's bad guys using his own money and toys. Oh and the toys this time...The new Blackhawke is different and his renaissance to connect with his pirate blood. I just knew and waited for him to hoist that flag! Another great difference is that Bond usually keeps all interests at arm's length, especially the ones with the potential for love. I guess it is his weakness. Ted Bell gives us Alex and he wears his love, for Stokley (he's the man!), Pellham, Congreve, and now Alexi, on his sleeve. He is not afraid to profess is love for them and fight to the end for each and every one of them. This book did set an interesting stage for me, as I wondered how Anastasia could just drop off the pages, just like that? At first I raised an eyebrow and then realized that it looks like we're going to China next and I have a good feeling that Anastasia will want to check in with Alexi. I read Crash Dive, his short story the night before the release of Phantom. Well that was just a big tease. That one really ripped the `ole mailbag of the post! I think the Dragon might help the old Ted Bell crack head over here. In Phantom, Bell really brings in real figures, like Putin. He weaves them into the story as if he made them up. It works so well and is so realistic. Now, the real stunner of this novel, is the introduction of "Singularity". This is the point in time when artificial intelligence surpasses human knowledge. This had me really uncomfortable and the thought of singularity had me creating doomsday scenarios in my head. His explanation and integration of a "new" and scariest villain was flawless. I was able to fly along and visualize every detail. I must say, the afterword was the most provocative and substantiated part of the book. I am really impressed with the depth he immersed himself into in order accurately portray his story. Bottom line, this was a fantastic novel, except that Ted Bell should write books, just for me, that are longer than War and Peace. I cannot get enough! like I said, I feel like an Alex Hawke crack head. It will be interesting one day to see if Alexi goes into daddy's business.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    The best yet. And that's saying something, believe me. Wow.

    The best yet. And that's saying something, believe me. Wow.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2012

    Goldflower

    Gold~ *she fought the hawlk off and it raked its claws down her side. She picked him up and brought him back to camp*

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2012

    Mr. Bell does take liberties with his storytelling. In the begi

    Mr. Bell does take liberties with his storytelling. In the beginning of Phantom, he mentions that Alex Hawke just turned 33. Then he makes reference to the Arab Spring (which took place in 2011). Then he talks about Harke being a POW during the first Gulf War, and having been a lieutenant. Was he a 12 year old lieutenant held in a POW camp during the first Gulf War? The book is fun to read, but please be consistent in the storytelling.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Phantom is a rather disappointing tale that could have been shor

    Phantom is a rather disappointing tale that could have been shortened by a good 200 pages. There is so much padding here, not the least of which is everything involving the son, Alexei. Not necessary to the story at all, and the pages wasted in finding him were a waste of my time. The story is weak and the battle scenes dreary. We do know who is going to win, so why spend pages and pages on every single volley? And to think I have liked Ted Bell novels to this point.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2012

    Alex Hawke is what you get when you combine a suave James Bond M

    Alex Hawke is what you get when you combine a suave James Bond MI6 agent with a hardcore Navy Seal. Yet in the latest Alex Hawke novel, Phantom, Ted Bell creates a new persona for Hawke to embody: father. Alex Hawke endured a difficult mourning period after the loss of his beloved Anastasia and their unborn child. Having already suffered heartbreak once when his bride was murdered on the steps of the wedding chapel, the loss of Anastasia depicts the continuous suffering that Hawke has endured in his life while sacrifices for his country. With the realization of Anastasia’s survival at the end of Warlord, Hawke is blinded by his determination for his suspicions to be confirmed. However, a happy reunion leading to a perfect ending is not Ted Bell’s style. Although Hawke’s life with Anastasia is no longer a possibility, he becomes responsible for his son’s well being. Yet with Alexei being a constant part of Hawke’s life now, the choice of duty for his country verses responsibilities at home becomes more painful and challenging. For once in his life there is someone who directly depends on him, and he is severely conflicted by the possibility that his work could lead to similar scars that were imprinted on him as a young boy when he witnessed his own parents’ murders. Ted Bell creates the ultimate challenge for Alex Hawke as he debates what his true responsibilities are in life. What would Alexei be like growing up without a mother and a father?
    The challenges presented to Hawke in Phantom are greater than any he has faced before, especially when the enemies are more difficult to detect and almost completely invisible. Only Ted Bell would begin an Alex Hawke novel with a systematic attack on Walt Disney World. The place of pure happiness, “where dreams come true”, is victim of a new artificial intelligence weapon referred to as “Phantom”. The artificial intelligence machine continues to attack, as it grows stronger. The threat of its power increases as it attempts to bring down Air Force One, detonates missile silos, and reprograms an Israeli weapon. The powers of this unconventional AI machine is unprecedented, and it seems that Alex Hawke and his team are the only ones with the audacity to pursue this illusive enemy. As they sails into the Strait of Iran to neutralize this enemy, Hawke is challenged by the responsibility of protecting Alexei while he is far from home, hopeful to return and once again be his father.
    While at times the military jargon is confusing, and one must frequently Google terms, the language allows the reader to feel apart of Alex Hawke’s mission. I wanted to be standing next to Hawke on the newly designed Blackhawke, commanding the sailors to attack the enemy ships. The action is riveting and created the illusion that the reader is in the depths of an Alex Hawke thriller. This vulnerable side of Hawke depicts an emotional journey as he continues to protect the world. Phantom is once again, a thrill-seeking, fast-paced Ted Bell novel that pushes the reader to keep turning the page to discover what more is in store for Alex Hawke.


    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2012

    Ted Bell you have done it once again. Arrived on my nook the

    Ted Bell you have done it once again. Arrived on my nook the day it came out. Waited 3 months. Could not put the it down. So real. Not enough words to express my thoughts and feelings on your best ever. Did not want the book to end. If you like Vince Flynn you' love Ted Bell.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    Goldenheart

    A light golden tabby with white underbelly and paws. Ice blue eyes and a jay feather hanging from her leaft ear. Kind, careing, respectful and wants nothing but a loveing family.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    Snowdrop's bio

    Name: look up. Gender: seriously? Coat: a snow color. Markings: sky blue and white tabby, with a chest mark of a snowdrop flower. Eyes: blind blue. Pers: a bit shy, has a soft spot for kits and toms who have that quality, and is a bit over defensive. Voice: high pitched, usually trembling. Theme song: Fire to the Rain by Adele. Other: cousin to a villan.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    Silverfrosts bio

    Is a silver white shecat with blue eyes. She has massive paws and she is expereanced..loveing and gental and kind...and respectful..

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    Shinerdust

    Name:shinerdust. Persontality:loving but feirce shell do anytging for her family. Wants kits:yes. Appearamce:small ears and a long tail her black fur shines she has a heart mark on her tail.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    Cloverwisp's bio

    Name: Clover fo short * Gender: She * Description: Beautiful jet black cat with peircing green eyes. Her fur shines in the moonlight. * Personality: Sweet, Loving, Gentle * Mate: None, wants * Crush: Yep * Kits: None

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2013

    If this isn't the best of the best, I don't know what is. These

    If this isn't the best of the best, I don't know what is. These Hawke novels consistently deliver
    stay up all night plots, pulse-throbbing action, humor, sex, the kitchen sink basically. No one
    does it better. Alex Hawke, saving the planet one bullet at a time. Start with the first one, Hawke,
    and work your way through. Great way to spend the summer, imho.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2013

    This is the fourth Alex Hawke book that I have read and it was t

    This is the fourth Alex Hawke book that I have read and it was the best one yet! Could not put it down because it was so good. Highly recommend

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2012

    anonymous

    I have enjoyed this author in previous books. This one just seemed
    predictable and shallow.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    Noname

    How bout me

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews

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