Pharaoh, Pharaoh

Overview

Pharaoh, Pharaoh is a meditation on time, memory, inheritance, and the irony of loss - loss of one's land, of one's past, of love itself. With senses keenly attuned to every nuance of light and landscape, Claudia Emerson Andrews invests her lines with a scriptural fire in this debut collection. She captures equally and with apparent effortlessness the bewilderment of the culturally bereft in the "stuttered eloquence" of an auctioneer, and the evanescence of appearances in the image of a dying firefly "coughing up...
See more details below
This Hardcover is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

Pharaoh, Pharaoh is a meditation on time, memory, inheritance, and the irony of loss - loss of one's land, of one's past, of love itself. With senses keenly attuned to every nuance of light and landscape, Claudia Emerson Andrews invests her lines with a scriptural fire in this debut collection. She captures equally and with apparent effortlessness the bewilderment of the culturally bereft in the "stuttered eloquence" of an auctioneer, and the evanescence of appearances in the image of a dying firefly "coughing up light."
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
A soft, romantic spirit haunts this collection of poems, a meditation on the events and repercussions of lives lived in the South. In "Searching the Title," which establishes the author's place among family and upon the land, an "old, forgotten dimension" is symbolized by a fading map. Andrews digs under the skin of events and objects to get at significance, even if it's only hinted at. "Auction" muses about the character of a dead man and his wife through the inventory of their possessions: "His late wife's dressing table gives up/ its confused vanities: snaggletooth combs,/ the warbled wire of hairpins, a lipstick,/ a faint layer of blush over all." The middle poems wend through a familiar scenery of rural fences, funerals, a farm grave, a chicken coop, moonlight, a road that once was a riverbed. At one point, the poet remembers getting sick with "romantic fever" and lying in bed watching the fireflies "coughing up light." The final poems in the book hover around death: the dying of animals, the picking clean of their bones by buzzards and the dying of humans. Andrews often displays a subtle craft and an eye for symbolic, compelling detail. But many of the poems describe a mood of privatized sentimentality that is neither immediate nor engaging. These spare, melancholy poems, with their fenced-in, distant clarity, remain in the province of the writer.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A soft, romantic spirit haunts this collection of poems, a meditation on the events and repercussions of lives lived in the South. In "Searching the Title," which establishes the author's place among family and upon the land, an "old, forgotten dimension" is symbolized by a fading map. Andrews digs under the skin of events and objects to get at significance, even if it's only hinted at. "Auction" muses about the character of a dead man and his wife through the inventory of their possessions: "His late wife's dressing table gives up/ its confused vanities: snaggletooth combs,/ the warbled wire of hairpins, a lipstick,/ a faint layer of blush over all." The middle poems wend through a familiar scenery of rural fences, funerals, a farm grave, a chicken coop, moonlight, a road that once was a riverbed. At one point, the poet remembers getting sick with "romantic fever" and lying in bed watching the fireflies "coughing up light." The final poems in the book hover around death: the dying of animals, the picking clean of their bones by buzzards and the dying of humans. Andrews often displays a subtle craft and an eye for symbolic, compelling detail. But many of the poems describe a mood of privatized sentimentality that is neither immediate nor engaging. These spare, melancholy poems, with their fenced-in, distant clarity, remain in the province of the writer. (May) FYI: This collection is part of the publisher's Southern Messenger Poets series, edited by Dave Smith.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

Searching the Title 1
Auction 5
Cleaning the Graves 6
Airstream 7
One Hand on the Wheel 10
Portrait 11
Nothing for the Salt 12
Abandoned Farm Grave 14
Going Once, Going Twice 15
The Milk Cow Speaks of Winter 17
The Moon Is Made 21
In the Acoustic Shadow 22
Romantic Fever 23
Skin Deep 24
Bedtime Story 26
Prodigal 28
Fortune 29
Plagues 30
First Tooth 31
Bait 35
Bait Man 36
The Taxidermist 40
Timepiece 41
Transgressions 45
Barn Cat 47
Morphine Dreams 48
Stable 49
Gossip 50
Stoic 52
Looking for Grandmother's Grave 53
Hawk 54
Phoenix 55
Inheritance 56
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)