Pharmaceuticals-Where's the Brand Logic?: Branding Lessons and Strategy

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Insights and analysis that challenge current thought on consumer branding theory and strategy

Pharmaceutical companies need to go beyond simply relying on strong sales forces and innovative research and development to succeed. Effective branding strategy is essential. Pharmaceuticals—Where’s the Brand Logic?: Branding Lessons and Strategy discusses in detail the application of current consumer branding theory to pharmaceutical marketing. This comprehensive book pulls information...

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Overview

Insights and analysis that challenge current thought on consumer branding theory and strategy

Pharmaceutical companies need to go beyond simply relying on strong sales forces and innovative research and development to succeed. Effective branding strategy is essential. Pharmaceuticals—Where’s the Brand Logic?: Branding Lessons and Strategy discusses in detail the application of current consumer branding theory to pharmaceutical marketing. This comprehensive book pulls information from fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) research and brand theory and applies it to the pharmaceutical world. It looks at branding on multiple levels within the pharmaceutical industry, including the industry brand, the corporate brand, the franchise brand, and the global and local product brand. Practical strategies are extensively explained and future challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry are explored, all geared to help any pharmaceutical professional to successfully market his or her brand.

Pharmaceuticals—Where’s the Brand Logic?: Branding Lessons and Strategy may well become a daily reference for anyone in the industry, providing in a single volume a framework for the organization of a brand portfolio for any pharmaceutical company. This unique resource challenges traditional thought about the concept of branding in the pharmaceutical industry, examining several of the most difficult branding theory issues. This helpful guide provides several figures to fully explain data.

Topics in Pharmaceuticals—Where’s the Brand Logic?: Branding Lessons and Strategy include:

  • what is branding
  • how is branding applied to the FMCG and pharmaceutical industries
  • corporate brands—and how they can be leveraged
  • franchise branding as a business strategy
  • developing and sustaining pharmaceutical brands over time
  • saving the credibility of the pharmaceutical industry
  • changing the pharmaceutical business model to use branding as a strategic tool
  • much, much more
Pharmaceuticals—Where’s the Brand Logic?: Branding Lessons and Strategy provides the information and tools to help gain the competitive edge in a tough marketplace. This is an invaluable resource for anyone in the global pharmaceutical industry, including marketing personnel, senior management, general managers, strategy groups, and training departments.
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What People Are Saying

Leonard Lerer
ESSENTIAL READING for executives seeking a practical toolkit for brand management and provides insightful approaches to extracting the maximum value from products in the face of cost-containment and regulatory, public and media scrutiny. This book supports our reflection on the evolution of the pharmaceutical industry and its future brand strategies. (Leonard Lerer, MD, MBA, INSEAD Healthcare Management Initiative, Managing Editor - Journal of Medical Marketing)
Mike Owen
At last we have a book that not only focuses on brands and branding from a pharmaceutical perspective but that is BOTH HIGHLY READABLE AND HIGHLY INSIGHTFUL. Make no mistake about it, this is not simply a re-hashing of consumer brand theory for a pharmaceutical audience; on the contrary this is A WELL ARGUED AND CHALLENGING WORK THAT TAKES OUR UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT PHARMACEUTICAL BRANDING COULD ACHIEVE TO NEW LEVELS. For me this work SHOULD BE COMPULSORY READING for all who aspire to market or play a part in the marketing of pharmaceutical brands. Moss takes us through a journey that begins with the Greek and Roman origins of branding, builds a real understanding of how the theory and practice of branding can be applied and adapted to the pharmaceutical industry, and ends by challenging us not to shy away from tough decisions about branding but to embrace brand theory and take a long term strategic view in the interests of both the individual product brands, the companies who make them and the consumers who use them. Whilst the first five chapters provide an excellent analysis of how current theory and practice apply to the pharmaceutical industry it is the second half of the book that really excited me as it fundamentally questions our current approach to pharmaceutical branding; Moss confronts the assumption that the pharma brand can only survive as long as its patent and articulates the benefits of putting the pharma brand at the heart of our enterprise, removing the rigid focus on the product life cycle and opening our minds to the potential to sustain a brand over a much longer period of time. . . . His arguments here are compelling and we ignore them at our peril; hopefully the debate on rebuilding the 'tarnished pharmaceutical industry brand' begins here. (Mike Owen, MMRS, BSc Econ, CEO Brand Health International)
Gary Noon
Giles has created a book based on his DEEP UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY, to which he has applied a marketer's eye. He has found an industry that has focused on product features, with revenue driven largely by a heavy emphasis on sales promotion. (Gary Noon, MSc, BSc, MBA; CEO, Aegate Limited, Cambridge Technology Centre, Melbourn)
Laurence G. Poli
A MUST READ for senior management facing the new challenges in healthcare as well as the individuals who aspire to positions of product and marketing management. But those who will gain immediate value from this book are the practitioners involved, today in promoting and delivering these therapies to the patients and healthcare providers. After reading this book they should think of themselves more as branding managers, rather than brand/ product managers. (Laurence G. Poli, MBA, PhD, Managing Partner, Center for Performance Excellence, LLC)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789032584
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 6/28/2007
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

  • Foreword (E. M. [Mick] Kolassa)
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Branding History
  • The Pharmaceutical Product Attribute Trap
  • Products, Not Brands
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 2. What Is Branding?
  • What Is a Strong Brand?
  • Markets That Change
  • Classic Brand Management
  • Modern Brand Management
  • Career Paths in Marketing
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 3. Brand Architecture
  • Introduction
  • Brand Hierarchy
  • Other Brand Extension Strategies
  • Product Brand Differentiators
  • Why Manage a Pharmaceutical Brand Portfolio?
  • Providing Focus for Business Development and Alliances
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 4. Corporate Brand
  • What Does a Corporate Brand Stand For?
  • Relevance of a Corporate Brand in Pharmaceuticals
  • Leveraging Corporate Brands
  • Downside of Corporate Brands
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 5. The Franchise Brand
  • Pharmaceutical Franchises
  • Advantages of Owning a Real Franchise
  • Franchise Criteria
  • Franchises—An Underused Opportunity?
  • Who Should Be Building Franchise Brands?
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 6. Developing Brands
  • Global Branding
  • Are the Driving Forces the Same in Pharmaceuticals?
  • Attitudes Toward Global Brands
  • Global Brands in Pharmaceuticals
  • Direct-to-Consumer Advertising (DTCa)
  • The Internet
  • Pharmaceutical Branding Complexity
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 7. Product Brand Longevity
  • Consumer Experience
  • Distributor Own Brands and Generics
  • Brand Decline
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 8. Sustaining a Product Brand Over Time
  • Pharmaceutical Brand Life Determinants
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 9. The Pharmaceutical Industry Brand
  • Why Do People Prefer Tobacco Companies to Pharmaceutical Companies?
  • Victims or Creators of Our Own Destiny?
  • What the Future Brings
  • Moving Forward
  • Conclusions
  • Chapter 10. The Pharmaceutical Business Model
  • The Blockbuster Model: What Have We Learned?
  • Blurring Segmentation Between Pharmaceuticals, Biotech, and Generic Models
  • Strategy Decisions Taking Decades to Pay Off
  • Complexity of Brand Communication Increasing
  • The Answer?
  • Conclusions
  • Notes
  • Index
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