Pharmacy Education / Edition 1

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Overview

Pharmacy Education: What Matters in Learning and Teaching is an essential resource for any pharmacy faculty member. More than a narration of the philosophical aspects of teaching and personal perspectives on life as a faculty member, it explores ‘what matters”, “why it matters”, and “how to apply” the matter to teaching, learning, and assessment in pharmacy education. It covers a variety of teaching settings (e.g., large classroom, small group teaching, clinical site) and guides the reader in developing a deeper understanding of what it means to be a teacher. Scenarios are included in each chapter, offering readers the opportunity to readily apply educational theory to their role as educators and to adapt the book’s content to their specific educational setting. The reader, whether a part-time faculty member, full-time faculty member, or adjunct professor/preceptor, is given the opportunity to personalize the material addressed in the text to his/her stage of development through engagement in reflective workbook exercises.

Pharmacy Education: What Matters in Learning and Teaching is a valuable tool for mid-level senior-level faculty members as well as for new faculty. This text can also serve as a resource for adjunct faculty members and pharmacy residency directors and preceptors to aid in the development and refinement of clinical educational programs in pharmacy. This book will be a valuable tool for not only individual pharmacy educators but for schools of pharmacy and pharmacy residency programs in their provision of faculty development and preceptor development programs.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Melissa M. Ranieri, BS, PharmD (Temple University School of Pharmacy)
Description: Research has shown that students flourish when they are engaged in an active learning environment, and teaching is moving toward a learner-centered rather than a teacher-centered approach. This book outlines several strategies that have proven effective in incorporating active learning in various pharmacy learning environments.
Purpose: The unique workbook style enables readers to assess their teaching style in order to understand the best way to expand on their current didactic skills. It explains concepts in a way that readers can easily understand the benefits of implementing novel teaching strategies as well as how to incorporate them into their classes.
Audience: This book could be used by any pharmacy faculty member across the spectrum, from a newly hired instructor to a seasoned educator wishing to incorporate new teaching strategies. Chapters are nicely organized so readers can find information that is pertinent to them, such as small group learning versus teaching in a large classroom. The authors, both experienced faculty who teach in the didactic and experiential settings, are experts in the field of pharmacy education; this is apparent in the practical way the text flows.
Features: The first chapter addresses the characteristics of an effective teacher, with exercises to help readers reflect upon their own strengths and weaknesses as educators. Chapter 2 focuses on students and how they learn, which is fundamental to the educational tools we choose to implement. Other chapters explain how to assess student learning, a valuable tool in the ever-evolving teacher-student dynamic. Separate chapters discuss teaching in small group versus large classroom environments and outline effective strategies to involve students and how to implement them. Sections on technology, professionalism, and faculty development are certainly pertinent to the challenges that pharmacy faculty encounter in teaching today.
Assessment: This is a comprehensive reference for pharmacy educators wishing to understand how students learn best or how to incorporate new teaching strategies in their classrooms. What is perhaps the book's best quality is its realistic approach. Although it includes innovative teaching strategies, it also explains their drawbacks and how students may or may not respond to them. It encourages educators to incorporate these strategies for active learning slowly, especially if students are accustomed to the traditional didactic approach, but to be persistent in moving forward.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Melissa M. Ranieri, BS, PharmD(Temple University School of Pharmacy)
Description: Research has shown that students flourish when they are engaged in an active learning environment, and teaching is moving toward a learner-centered rather than a teacher-centered approach. This book outlines several strategies that have proven effective in incorporating active learning in various pharmacy learning environments.
Purpose: The unique workbook style enables readers to assess their teaching style in order to understand the best way to expand on their current didactic skills. It explains concepts in a way that readers can easily understand the benefits of implementing novel teaching strategies as well as how to incorporate them into their classes.
Audience: This book could be used by any pharmacy faculty member across the spectrum, from a newly hired instructor to a seasoned educator wishing to incorporate new teaching strategies. Chapters are nicely organized so readers can find information that is pertinent to them, such as small group learning versus teaching in a large classroom. The authors, both experienced faculty who teach in the didactic and experiential settings, are experts in the field of pharmacy education; this is apparent in the practical way the text flows.
Features: The first chapter addresses the characteristics of an effective teacher, with exercises to help readers reflect upon their own strengths and weaknesses as educators. Chapter 2 focuses on students and how they learn, which is fundamental to the educational tools we choose to implement. Other chapters explain how to assess student learning, a valuable tool in the ever-evolving teacher-student dynamic. Separate chapters discuss teaching in small group versus large classroom environments and outline effective strategies to involve students and how to implement them. Sections on technology, professionalism, and faculty development are certainly pertinent to the challenges that pharmacy faculty encounter in teaching today.
Assessment: This is a comprehensive reference for pharmacy educators wishing to understand how students learn best or how to incorporate new teaching strategies in their classrooms. What is perhaps the book's best quality is its realistic approach. Although it includes innovative teaching strategies, it also explains their drawbacks and how students may or may not respond to them. It encourages educators to incorporate these strategies for active learning slowly, especially if students are accustomed to the traditional didactic approach, but to be persistent in moving forward.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Melissa M. Ranieri, BS, PharmD(Temple University School of Pharmacy)
Description: Research has shown that students flourish when they are engaged in an active learning environment, and teaching is moving toward a learner-centered rather than a teacher-centered approach. This book outlines several strategies that have proven effective in incorporating active learning in various pharmacy learning environments.
Purpose: The unique workbook style enables readers to assess their teaching style in order to understand the best way to expand on their current didactic skills. It explains concepts in a way that readers can easily understand the benefits of implementing novel teaching strategies as well as how to incorporate them into their classes.
Audience: This book could be used by any pharmacy faculty member across the spectrum, from a newly hired instructor to a seasoned educator wishing to incorporate new teaching strategies. Chapters are nicely organized so readers can find information that is pertinent to them, such as small group learning versus teaching in a large classroom. The authors, both experienced faculty who teach in the didactic and experiential settings, are experts in the field of pharmacy education; this is apparent in the practical way the text flows.
Features: The first chapter addresses the characteristics of an effective teacher, with exercises to help readers reflect upon their own strengths and weaknesses as educators. Chapter 2 focuses on students and how they learn, which is fundamental to the educational tools we choose to implement. Other chapters explain how to assess student learning, a valuable tool in the ever-evolving teacher-student dynamic. Separate chapters discuss teaching in small group versus large classroom environments and outline effective strategies to involve students and how to implement them. Sections on technology, professionalism, and faculty development are certainly pertinent to the challenges that pharmacy faculty encounter in teaching today.
Assessment: This is a comprehensive reference for pharmacy educators wishing to understand how students learn best or how to incorporate new teaching strategies in their classrooms. What is perhaps the book's best quality is its realistic approach. Although it includes innovative teaching strategies, it also explains their drawbacks and how students may or may not respond to them. It encourages educators to incorporate these strategies for active learning slowly, especially if students are accustomed to the traditional didactic approach, but to be persistent in moving forward.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Melissa M. Ranieri, BS, PharmD (Temple University School of Pharmacy)
Description: Research has shown that students flourish when they are engaged in an active learning environment, and teaching is moving toward a learner-centered rather than a teacher-centered approach. This book outlines several strategies that have proven effective in incorporating active learning in various pharmacy learning environments.
Purpose: The unique workbook style enables readers to assess their teaching style in order to understand the best way to expand on their current didactic skills. It explains concepts in a way that readers can easily understand the benefits of implementing novel teaching strategies as well as how to incorporate them into their classes.
Audience: This book could be used by any pharmacy faculty member across the spectrum, from a newly hired instructor to a seasoned educator wishing to incorporate new teaching strategies. Chapters are nicely organized so readers can find information that is pertinent to them, such as small group learning versus teaching in a large classroom. The authors, both experienced faculty who teach in the didactic and experiential settings, are experts in the field of pharmacy education; this is apparent in the practical way the text flows.
Features: The first chapter addresses the characteristics of an effective teacher, with exercises to help readers reflect upon their own strengths and weaknesses as educators. Chapter 2 focuses on students and how they learn, which is fundamental to the educational tools we choose to implement. Other chapters explain how to assess student learning, a valuable tool in the ever-evolving teacher-student dynamic. Separate chapters discuss teaching in small group versus large classroom environments and outline effective strategies to involve students and how to implement them. Sections on technology, professionalism, and faculty development are certainly pertinent to the challenges that pharmacy faculty encounter in teaching today.
Assessment: This is a comprehensive reference for pharmacy educators wishing to understand how students learn best or how to incorporate new teaching strategies in their classrooms. What is perhaps the book's best quality is its realistic approach. Although it includes innovative teaching strategies, it also explains their drawbacks and how students may or may not respond to them. It encourages educators to incorporate these strategies for active learning slowly, especially if students are accustomed to the traditional didactic approach, but to be persistent in moving forward.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763773977
  • Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
  • Publication date: 8/18/2010
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 348
  • Sales rank: 275,006
  • Product dimensions: 12.10 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.20 (d)

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