Phenomenology of Intuition and Expression

Overview

Phenomenology of Intuition and Expression is a crucial text for understanding the early development of Heidegger's thought. This lecture course was presented in the summer semester of 1920 at the University of Freiburg. At the center of this course is Heidegger's elaboration of the meaning and function of the phenomenological destruction. In no other work by Heidegger do we find as comprehensive a treatment of the theme of destruction as in this lecture course. Culminating in a destruction of contemporaneous ...

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Overview

Phenomenology of Intuition and Expression is a crucial text for understanding the early development of Heidegger's thought. This lecture course was presented in the summer semester of 1920 at the University of Freiburg. At the center of this course is Heidegger's elaboration of the meaning and function of the phenomenological destruction. In no other work by Heidegger do we find as comprehensive a treatment of the theme of destruction as in this lecture course. Culminating in a destruction of contemporaneous philosophy in terms of its understanding of ‘life' as a primal phenomenon, this lecture course can be seen to open the way towards a renewal of the meaning of philosophy as such.

This hugely important philosophical work is now available in English for the first time.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847064448
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 8/19/2010
  • Series: Athlone Contemporary European Thinkers Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 1,377,453
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) is regarded as one of the twentieth century's most important philosophers.

Tracy Colony teaches philosophy at the European College of Liberal Arts, Berlin, Germany.

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Table of Contents

Translator's foreword xi

Introduction: the problem situation of philosophy 1

1 The function of a 'Theory of Philosophical Concept Formation' in phenomenology 1

2 The distinction between scientific philosophy and worldview philosophy 6

3 Life philosophy and culture philosophy - the two main groups of contemporary philosophy 8

4 Life as primal phenomenon and the two problem groups of contemporary philosophy 12

a Life as objectifying and the problem of absolute validity (the problem of the a priori) 13

b Life as experiencing and the problem of the irrational (the problem of lived experience) 17

5 The phenomenological destruction 21

a The function of phenomenology within the whole of philosophizing 21

b The boundedness of phenomenological destruction to preconception 24

c Philosophy and factical life experience 26

d The application of the destruction in the two problem groups 28

Part 1 31

On the destruction of the problem of the a priori 33

6 The six meanings of history and first bringing-out of the pre-delineations in them 33

7 The right pursuit of the pre-delineations: the explication of the sense-complexes 38

8 Characterization of relation: the articulation of the sense-complexes according to the sense of relation 46

9 The role of the historical within the a priori tendency of philosophy 51

10 Characterization of enactment: the articulation of the sense-complexes according to the sense of enactment 56

a The task of phenomenological dijudication 56

b The phenomenological dijudication of the genuine enactments of the meaning-complexes in question 57

Part 2 67

On the destruction of the problem of lived experience 69

11 The transition to the second problem group and the relation between psychology and philosophy 69

Section 1 The destructing consideration of the Natorpian position 73

12 The four viewpoints of destruction 73

13 Natorp's general reconstructive psychology 77

a The method of reconstruction 77

b The disposition of psychology 83

14 The carrying-out of the destruction 87

a In which tendency does Natorp approach the complex of lived experience? 87

b Which is the character of unity and manifoldness of the complex of lived experience? 90

c How does the 'I' comport itself in the complex of lived experience? 95

d How is the 'I' itself had? 95

15 Constitution as guiding preconception 99

a The primacy of the method 99

b The determination of the problem of the 'I' through the idea of constitution 101

c The radicalization of the theoretical in the idea of constitution 106

d Enactmental and order-complex 113

Section 2 The destructing consideration of the Diltheyian position 115

16 The attitudinal character of Natorp's philosophy and the expectation of the opposite in Dilthey's 115

17 Report on Dilthey's philosophy 120

18 The destruction of the Diltheyian philosophy 125

19 Natorp and Dilthey - the task of philosophy 129

Appendix 135

Editor's afterword to the second edition 155

Glossary 159

Notes 161

Index 167

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