Philip Dru: Administrator: A Story of Tomorrow, 1920-1935 [NOOK Book]

Overview

Philip Dru is an extremely obscure political tract written in 1911 by "Colonel" Edward Mandell House, a key advisor to Woodrow Wilson and FDR. This is what makes the book so shocking. The book advocates the violent overthrow of the constitutional government and proposes a communist/socialist system as its replacement. Considering that the man who wrote this book had such a close position to the president, it's no surprise that some of the ideas in this book eventually became public policy. Philip Dru, the main ...
See more details below
Philip Dru: Administrator: A Story of Tomorrow, 1920-1935

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1912 volume)
FREE

Overview

Philip Dru is an extremely obscure political tract written in 1911 by "Colonel" Edward Mandell House, a key advisor to Woodrow Wilson and FDR. This is what makes the book so shocking. The book advocates the violent overthrow of the constitutional government and proposes a communist/socialist system as its replacement. Considering that the man who wrote this book had such a close position to the president, it's no surprise that some of the ideas in this book eventually became public policy. Philip Dru, the main character, is a West Point graduate who eventually resigns his post and becomes involved in social problems. Dru is chosen to lead an army against the U.S. government led by a puppet president. When Dru gains control he throws the Constitution out the window and nationalizes industries such as the telegraph (remember, it's 1911) and makes corporations subservient to government. He promises a job to every American, and rewrites the state constitutions. Watch for the part where Senator Selwyn talks about how he used direct marketing, etc., to get his man elected as president. Most of what he used is standard operating procedure today. In this book, the people revolt over what he does! Though poorly written, no one would doubt the importance of Adolph Hitler's "Mein Kampf." The same could be said of "Philip Dru." Certain facts, once denied, reveal how we, as a nation, got so far off track. One of those facts is the collusion between International Bankers, Monopoly Capitalists and Fabian Socialist Edward Mandell House.
This collusion resulted in the unconstitutional privatizing of our monetary system, under the guise of the Federal Reserve. The dangerous nature of the Federal Reserve is best summed up by the patriarch of one International Banking family: "Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes the laws." - Mayer Amschel Rothschild. The importance of "Philip Dru: Adminstrator" is the insight into the mindset of those who believe in the New World Order, once denied, now freely discussed. It is a testament to the dangerously effective "gradualist" subversion that America has been subjected to over the last 100 years. The "incremental" Socialism promoted by the Fabian Society since 1884...a little more each generation, leading us to their goal: "The American people will never knowingly adopt socialism, but under the name of liberalism they will adopt every fragment of the socialist program until one day America will be a socialist nation without ever knowing how it happened." - Norman Thomas, American socialist
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940029463203
  • Publisher: B.W. Huebsch
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1912 volume
  • File size: 11 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Edward Mandell House (1858-1938) was an American diplomat, politician, and presidential advisor. Commonly known by the title of Colonel House, although he had no military experience, he had enormous personal influence with U.S. President Woodrow Wilson as his foreign policy advisor until Wilson removed him in 1919. House played a major role in shaping wartime diplomacy. Wilson had House assemble "The Inquiry"-a team of academic experts to devise efficient postwar solutions to all the world's problems. In September 1918, Wilson gave House the responsibility for preparing a constitution for a League of Nations. In October 1918, when Germany petitioned for peace based on the Fourteen Points, Wilson charged House with working out details of an armistice with the Allies. House helped Wilson outline his Fourteen Points, and worked with the president on the drafting of the Treaty of Versailles and the Covenant of the League of Nations. House served on the League of Nations Commission on Mandates with Lord Milner and Lord Robert Cecil of Great Britain, M. Simon of France, Viscount Chinda of Japan, Guglielmo Marconi for Italy, and George Louis Beer as adviser. On May 30, 1919 House participated in a meeting in Paris, which laid the groundwork for establishment of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Throughout 1919, House urged Wilson to work with Senator Henry Cabot Lodge to achieve ratification of the Versailles Treaty. However, the conference revealed serious policy disagreements between Wilson and House. Even worse were personality conflicts. Wilson had become much more intolerant and systematically broke with one after another of his closest advisors. When Wilson returned home in February 1919, House took his place on the Council of Ten where he negotiated compromises unacceptable to Wilson. In mid-March 1919, Wilson returned to Paris and lost confidence in House, relegating him to the sidelines. In the 1920s, House strongly supported U.S. membership in the League of Nations and the World Court, the Permanent Court of International Justice. In 1932, House supported Franklin D. Roosevelt without joining the inner circle. Although he became disillusioned with the New Deal, he did not express his reservations in public.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)