Philip Heinrich Erlebach: VI Sonate

Philip Heinrich Erlebach: VI Sonate

by Rodolfo Richter
     
 

Philipp Heinrich Erlebach (1657-1714) worked for most of his career at the same court in Germany's Thuringia region and never published much music. He was hailed as a top composer in his own time, but an archive fire destroyed most of his manuscripts. So he was almost forgotten. Historical-performance violin specialist Rodolfo Richter…  See more details below

Overview

Philipp Heinrich Erlebach (1657-1714) worked for most of his career at the same court in Germany's Thuringia region and never published much music. He was hailed as a top composer in his own time, but an archive fire destroyed most of his manuscripts. So he was almost forgotten. Historical-performance violin specialist Rodolfo Richter has unearthed a set of six Erlebach sonatas for violin, viola da gamba, and continuo, and they offer tantalizing hints that the fire might have robbed us of a compositional giant. The album contains six sonatas of five movements each; two are for violino discordato or scordatura (retuned) violin, and one uses a violino piccolo. As Erlebach himself pointed out and liner note Robert Rawson explains further, the composer aimed toward goûts réunis or at least mélangés in this work; he sought to infuse Germanic counterpoint into suite-like groupings of dances preceded by multipart introductions. To this end he emancipated the viola da gamba from its usual continuo role and gave it an active part that would still have sounded unusually independent a generation later. There are charms aplenty in this music. Rawson calls several of Erlebach's sarabandes "folklike"; they are deeply lyrical pieces with a pastoral tinge reminiscent of Charpentier. Erlebach's music is dense, and at several points his treatment of his French suites is evocative of Bach himself: he has a similar delightful way, for example, of packing all kinds of interesting weight and detail into a gigue and conveniently forgetting that a gigue is, after all, just a jig. These nice Baroque finds are rendered on authentic instruments that include a pleasantly varied continuo group rotating among harpsichord, violine, and a pleasantly plunking theorbo. Erlebach's violin writing is not outwardly virtuosic, although scordatura is never easy to deal with. It is not knock-your-socks-off music in the Biber vein, but rather richly textured chamber music of consistently high quality.

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Product Details

Release Date:
01/01/2005
Label:
Linn Records
UPC:
0691062027021
catalogNumber:
270
Rank:
322650

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Sonata No. 1 in D major for violin, viola da gamba & basso continuo  - Philipp Heinrich Erlebach  - Peter McCarthy  - Silas Standage  - Alison McGillivray  - Eligio Quinteiro  - Rodolfo Richter
  2. Sonata No. 5 in B flat major for violin, viola da gamba & basso continuo  - Philipp Heinrich Erlebach  - Silas Standage  - Alison McGillivray  - Eligio Quinteiro  - Rodolfo Richter
  3. Sonata No. 2 in E minor for violin, viola da gamba & basso continuo  - Philipp Heinrich Erlebach  - Peter McCarthy  - Silas Standage  - Alison McGillivray  - Eligio Quinteiro  - Rodolfo Richter
  4. Sonata No. 4 in C major for violin discordato, viola da gamba & basso continuo  - Philipp Heinrich Erlebach  - Peter McCarthy  - Silas Standage  - Alison McGillivray  - Eligio Quinteiro
  5. Sonata No. 6 in F major for piccolo violin, viola da gamba & harpsichord  - Philipp Heinrich Erlebach  - Silas Standage  - Alison McGillivray  - Rodolfo Richter
  6. Sonata No. 3 in A major for violin discordato, viola da gamba & basso continuo  - Philipp Heinrich Erlebach  - Peter McCarthy  - Silas Standage  - Alison McGillivray  - Eligio Quinteiro

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