Phillis Sings Out Freedom: The Story of George Washington and Phillis Wheatley

Overview

In the fall of 1775, General George Washington was struggling to find a way to fight the British so that the colonies could be free from England. Phillis Wheatley, and African American poet who herself had struggled to gain freedom, decided to write Washington a poem of encouragement. Ann Malaspina's inspiring story shows the life and times of these two brave people who did so much to lay the foundation of our country.

Read More Show Less
...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $8.31   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (NOOK Kids - Digital Original)
$6.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

In the fall of 1775, General George Washington was struggling to find a way to fight the British so that the colonies could be free from England. Phillis Wheatley, and African American poet who herself had struggled to gain freedom, decided to write Washington a poem of encouragement. Ann Malaspina's inspiring story shows the life and times of these two brave people who did so much to lay the foundation of our country.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Words can be powerful allies during war, suggests this warm tribute to African-American poet Wheatley, who wrote an impassioned poem to Gen. George Washington during the American Revolution. Keeter's oil paintings alternate between scenes of Washington and his haggard soldiers and of Wheatley's upbringing. Taken by slave ship to Boston and sold to an affluent couple, Phillis learns to read and write; after proving the legitimacy of her poems, she is set free and writes to Washington to show her support. Malaspina documents the Continental Army's first victory, and as the British retreat, Wheatley wields a quill and paper: "And with her poems, Phillis Wheatley sang out freedom--for herself and a new nation." Ages 7–10. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—Parallel stories tell of a poem written by Wheatley that inspired General Washington during the Revolutionary War. Born in Africa, Phillis was taken by slave traders and sold in Boston as a young girl. Her owners, the Wheatleys, allowed their daughter to teach her to read. They were amazed by the poems she soon began to write. Her abilities challenged many people's convictions that slaves had low intelligence and could not be educated. After being freed, Wheatley decided to take up another cause. In 1775, she wrote a poem about freedom and sent it to Washington. He wrote back, thanking her for her confidence in him. For Washington's part of the story, the author concentrates on the difficult winter of 1775–'76, when the Continental Army was camped in Massachusetts, keeping the British Army bottled up nearby in Boston. Including both individuals places Wheatley into chronological context and broadens the appeal of this picture book. Oil paintings help readers gain a sense of the period.—Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA
Kirkus Reviews

How does an enslaved African woman learn to read and write, become a prolific poet and earn recognition from a renowned general and future first president of the United States? Malaspina's brief account is evocative and uncomplicated. Her portrayal of both Washington's battles on the field and Wheatley's struggles on the home front illustrate the essential irony of the American Revolution. The fact that the colonists were at once fighting for their freedom from England and depriving Africans of theirs is one of the great hypocrisies of American history. The text addresses it, but the emphasis is placed on Washington's and Wheatley's twin triumphs, he in liberating Boston and she in publishing her poems. It ends on a high note, leaving Wheatley's descent into poverty and early death to an author's note (to which is appended the 1772 authentication of Wheatley's authorship). Keeter's illustrations depict the depth of character of the individuals and the hardships and challenges of their environments. (bibliography) (Picture book. 6-10)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807565452
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 9/1/2010
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 779,043
  • Age range: 6 - 9 Years
  • Lexile: AD780L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 10.90 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)