Philosophical Designs for a Socio-Cultural Transformation

Overview

Modern epistemology and modern society have separated subject from object, defined economy as industrialization, structured politics into the formations of nation-states, and institutionalized social practices. These 'philosophical and social designs of separations' have given birth to physical and symbolic violence at various levels. This volume presents original writings and interviews with prominent thinkers on the front lines of an international intellectual effort to reconsider the fundamental terms of ...

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Overview

Modern epistemology and modern society have separated subject from object, defined economy as industrialization, structured politics into the formations of nation-states, and institutionalized social practices. These 'philosophical and social designs of separations' have given birth to physical and symbolic violence at various levels. This volume presents original writings and interviews with prominent thinkers on the front lines of an international intellectual effort to reconsider the fundamental terms of modernity and promote a philosophical design that reconsiders the significance of modernity itself. Through transdisciplinary 'thinking technologies' drawing on fields such as philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology, contemporary social research, women's studies, architecture and urban studies, contributors rethink the modern in all its depth, draw forth a critical affirmation of modernity, and seek new ways of deploying the intelligence of West and East.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780847695386
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/28/1999
  • Pages: 860
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 10.08 (h) x 2.33 (d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Intorduction Chapter 2 The Language of Subjectivity Chapter 3 Histoire, Languages, Pratiques Chapter 4 Genetic and Molecular Bodies Chapter 5 Philosophical Design for .......... Chapter 6 Sur "Don" Chapter 7 Economie de Grandeur at Agape Chapter 8 Consuming Place and Sociological View Chapter 9 Aisan Thought and Ryokan Chapter 10 De Discours Féminin Chapter 11 Women and Psychoanalysis Chapter 12 Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative Chapter 13 The Enemy Outside: Thoughts on the Psychodynamics of Extreme Violence with Special Attention to Men and Masculinity Chapter 14 La Violence et les Femmes A Pars An XVIIIe Siécl Chapter 15 Violence Against Women: Challenges to the Liberal State and Rational Feminism Chapter 16 Love and Music in Transforming World Chapter 17 Postmodernist Turn Chapter 18 The Virtual Edge: Postmodern Surgery Chapter 19 Against Postmodernism Chapter 20 Walter Benjamin, Rememberance, and the First World War Chapter 21 A Political Ideology and Profile of Walter Benjamin: Violence and Liberation History of Relief Chapter 22 Re-Writing the Self: Foucoult on Power and Value Chapter 23 Nietzche and Freud: Two Voices from the Underground Chapter 24 A Discursive Shpere of Self-Referential Cultural Anthropology: An essay on Paul Rainbow Chapter 25 Overcoming Violence and Brutality Through A New Seismography of Spirit Chapter 26 Violence and Civilization of Sports Chapter 27 Aristotle's Theater of Envy: Paradox, Logic, and Literature Chapter 28 On Violence Chapter 29 Pragmatism, Art, and Violence: The Case of Rap Chapter 30 Outline for an Anthropology of Religion and Violence Chapter 31 National Identities and Global Technologies Chapter 32 The Invention of Mexico: Notes on Nationalism and National Identity Chapter 33 Fiction and Reality: A Personal Experience Chapter 34 Acerca de la Violencia: mexico contemporaneo en el mundo cambiante Chapter 35 Violencias Salvajes: Usos, Costumbres y Sociedad Civil en México Chapter 36 Canadian Discourse on Peacekeeping Chapter 37 ?The Century of Technology? Chapter 38 What is Culture? A Sociological Reworking of the Philosophy of Hans Blumenberg Chapter 39 Public Shpere and Educational Change Chapter 40 Memory and the Cultural Reworking of Crisis: Racisms and the Current Moment of Danger in Sweden, or wanting It Like Before Chapter 41 Against Constructionism: The Historical Ethnography of Emotions Chapter 42 Architecture and the Lurking Potential Chapter 43 From Vernacularism to Globalism: The Temporal Reality of Traditional Settlements Chapter 44 What is Cosmopolitan? Chapter 45 Why I am not a Secularist Chapter 46 The Ethos of Engagement

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