Philosophical Foundations of Education: Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice / Edition 1

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130264091
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/8/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 7.48 (w) x 9.05 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Table of Contents

1. The Early Period (5th Century BCE to 4th Century CE).

Educational Philosophy and the Role of the Teacher

Pre-18th Century

Expansion of Teacher Education Programs

New Satndards for Teacher Education

Why Study Educational Philosophy?

Some Comments on Philosophical Thought

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice: Preliminary Thoughts on Defining a Personal Philosophy of Education

References

2. Perennialism and Essentialism.

Important Names

Important Terms

Focus Questions

Introduction

Plato (428-347 B.C. E)

Excerpt From Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Book II

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Case Study for Reflection: Ronald and Socrates

Case Story Follow-Up Activities

References

3. The Middle Ages (5th to 14th Centuries).

Improtant Names; Important Terms; Focus Questions

Introduction

Mortimer Adler (1902-2001)

Arthur Bestor (1908-1994)

E.D. Hirsch, Jr. (1928- )

Robert M. Hutchins (1899-1977)

Theodore Sizer (1932- )

What This Means for Schools

What This Means for Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice: Defining Your Personal Philosophy of Education

References

4. Scholasticism.

Important Names; Important Terms; Focus Questions

Introduction

Boethius (c. 480-c. 526)

Peter Abelard (c. 1079 -1142)

John Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308)

William of Ockham (1285-1347

Contributions of the Scholastic Period to the Present Time

Jacques Martain (1882-1973)

What This Means for Schools

What This Means for Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice: Defining Your Personal Philosophy of Education

References

5. The Early Modern Period (15th to 18th Centuries).

Important Names; Important Terms; Focus Questions

Introduction

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)

Rene Descartes(1596-1650)

John Locke (1632-1704)

Excerpt from Some Thoughts Concerning Education, by John Locke

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Case Story for Reflection: Benjamin

Case Story Follow-Up Activities

References

6. The Dawning of the Child-Centered Curriculum.

Important Names; Important Terms; Focus Questions

Introduction

Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)

Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827)

Friedrich Froebel (1782-1852)

What This Means for Schools

What This Means for Connecting Educational Philosophy to Theory and Practice

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice: Defining Your Personal Philosophy of Education

References

7. The Contemporary Period (19th and 20th Centuries).

Important Names; Important Terms; Focus Questions

Introduction

John Dewey (1859-1952)

Existentialism

Postmodernism

My Pedagogic Creed by John Dewey

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Case Study for Reflection: Mr. Cisco's Social Studies Class

Case Story for Follow-Up Activities

References

8. Progressivism and Constructivism.

Important Names; Important Terms; Focus Questions

Introduction

Progressivism

Contructivism

What This Means for Schools

What This Means for Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice

Discussion Questions; Suggested Activities

Connecting Philosophy to Theory and Practice: Defining Your Personal Philosophy of Education

References

9. Some Thoughts Concerning Education: Directions for the Twenty-First Century.

Writing Your Personal Philosophy of Education

References

Glossary.

Name Index.

Subject Index.

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