Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers

Overview

All of us ponder the big and enduring human questions—Who am I? Am I free? What should I do? What is good? Is there justice? Is life meaningful?—but this kind of philosophical interrogation is rarely carefully explored or even taken seriously in most primary and secondary school settings. However, introducing philosophy to young people well before they get to college can help to develop and deepen critical and creative thinking, foster social and behavioral skills, and increase ...

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Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers

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Overview

All of us ponder the big and enduring human questions—Who am I? Am I free? What should I do? What is good? Is there justice? Is life meaningful?—but this kind of philosophical interrogation is rarely carefully explored or even taken seriously in most primary and secondary school settings. However, introducing philosophy to young people well before they get to college can help to develop and deepen critical and creative thinking, foster social and behavioral skills, and increase philosophical awareness.

Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction Philosophers and Teachers is an invaluable resource for students and practitioners who wish to learn about the philosophy for children movement, and how to work its principles into their own classroom activities. The volume provides a wealth of practical information, including how to train educators to incorporate philosophy into their daily lessons, best practices and activity ideas for every grade level, and assessment strategies. With contributions from some of the best practitioners of philosophy for children, Philosophy in Schools is a must-have resource for students of philosophy and education alike.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Sara Goering is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. She is Program Director at the Northwest Center for Philosophy for Children (http://depts.washington.edu/nwcenter/), and has previously developed philosophy outreach programs in Boulder, Colorado and Long Beach, California.

Nicholas J. Shudak is Associate Professor and Division Chair of Curriculum and Instruction at The University of South Dakota, USA.

Thomas E. Wartenberg is Professor of Philosophy at Mt. Holyoke College, USA. He is the Director of Teaching Children Philosophy (www.teachingchildrenphilosophy.org), which was awarded the 2011 Prize for Excellence and Innovation in Philosophy Programs from the American Philosophical Association and the Philosophy Distribution Center.

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Table of Contents

Preface "Do Not Delay!" Introduction Part I: Models for getting philosophy to young people 1. Teachers bringing philosophy into the classroom 2. The need for philosophical frameworks in teacher education 3. Elementary school philosophy 4. A p4C experiment: The high school philosopher-in-residence 5. Creating engaging philosophy summer camps 6. Pre-college philosophy education: What can it be? The IAPC model 7. Does philosophy fit in caxias? A Latin American project Part II: Ideas for bringing philosophy into the K-8 classroom 8. Philosophical rules of engagement 9. Developing philosophical facilitation: a toolbox of philosophical "moves" 10. Philosophy in the great green room: Early children’s literature as philosophy for children 11. Teaching philosophy to young children 12. Philosophical children’s literature for upper elementary and middle school 13. The Moral Impulse: Talking about Moral Philosophy and Genocide with Middle School Students 14. Engaging students –of any age – in philosophical inquiry: How doing philosophy with children changed how I teach philosophy to college students Part III: Ideas for philosophy at the high school level 15. A different education: Philosophy and high school 16. Introducing philosophy courses in high school 17. Finding philosophy in high school literature: A Separate Peace and Beloved 18. Philosophy in the high school classroom: Film and literature 19. Project High-Phi 20. Philosophy across the ages: Some observations on content and strategy Part IV: Strategies for assessment 21. Can philosophy find a place in the K-12 curriculum? 22. A whole school approach to philosophy in schools: Outcomes and observations 23. Examining the effects of philosophy classes on the early development of argumentation skills 24. Assessing the outcomes of philosophical thinking with children 25. Unexpected philosophers: The advantages of teaching philosophy for disadvantaged students

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