The Philosophy Of Childhood

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$9.32
(Save 28%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $2.23
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 82%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $2.23   
  • New (2) from $12.97   
  • Used (14) from $2.23   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$12.97
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23157)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$13.07
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(9513)

Condition: New
New Book. Shipped from US within 4 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000

Ships from: Secaucus, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

So many questions, such an imagination, endless speculation: the child seems to be a natural philosopher--until the ripe old age of eight or nine, when the spirit of inquiry mysteriously fades. What happened? Was it something we did--or didn't do? Was the child truly the philosophical being he once seemed? Gareth Matthews takes up these concerns in The Philosophy of Childhood, a searching account of children's philosophical potential and of childhood as an area of philosophical inquiry. Seeking a philosophy that represents the range and depth of children's inquisitive minds, Matthews explores both how children think and how we, as adults, think about them.

Adult preconceptions about the mental life of children tend to discourage a child's philosophical bent, Matthews suggests, and he probes the sources of these limiting assumptions: restrictive notions of maturation and conceptual development; possible lapses in episodic memory; the experience of identity and growth as "successive selves," which separate us from our own childhoods. By exposing the underpinnings of our adult views of childhood, Matthews, a philosopher and longtime advocate of children's rights, clears the way for recognizing the philosophy of childhood as a legitimate field of inquiry. He then conducts us through various influential models for understanding what it is to be a child, from the theory that individual development recapitulates the development of the human species to accounts of moral and cognitive development, including Piaget's revolutionary model.

The metaphysics of playdough, the authenticity of children's art, the effects of divorce and intimations of mortality on a child--all have a place in Matthews's rich discussion of the philosophical nature of childhood. His book will prompt us to reconsider the distinctions we make about development and the competencies of mind, and what we lose by denying childhood its full philosophical breadth.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review - Anthony Gottlieb
Matthews' guided dialogues with children show that they consistently and happily develop philosophical trains of thought, evaluate those of others, and try to think things through, often reaching solutions that are essentially the ones propounded by the big people who are lucky enough to be paid for doing it...With careful listening and without distorting preconceptions about what children might or might not be capable of doing, Mr. Matthews has unearthed a seam of would-be wisdom. His open-minded attention to the way children's minds work has also yielded a new concept of childhood intelligence that may bear on the question of children's rights, children's art and the status of literature for children. He argues that the philosophy of childhood should be a respectable branch of philosophy, like the philosophy of science or the philosophy of law. This strikes me as too modest a goal. Mr. Matthews' incisive investigations into the relations between the world of children and the world of adults are too thought-provoking to be confined to one branch of one academic subject...He subjects Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development and Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development to simple and searching criticisms that make his book essential reading for anybody interested in early childhood education.
Theory and Psychology - Lucien T. Winegar
As overriding themes, he voices his clear opinion that both the study of children's philosophical thinking and the philosophy of childhood should be legitimate not only to our understanding of children, but also to our own ways of thinking…Matthews' book serves as a compelling reminder of the humanity of our co-participants in the study of human development.
Boston Globe - David Mehegan
The mind of the child...concerns Gareth Matthews' eloquent and thoughtful essays in The Philosophy of Childhood...In this book he raises a question...Do the philosophical sensibilities of children have any serious value? Or are they of no value because they come from immature minds? Matthews' view is that children's philosophical interests are not only valuable and profound but also are sadly perishable...[He] writes that adults who would do philosophy have much to learn from children.
Times Educational Supplement - Nicholas Tucker
A stimulating work, worthy of attention.
Philosophical Quarterly - David Carr
The Philosophy of Childhood is an attractive and thought-provoking work which also opens up territory which has seldom, if ever, been explored, for example, on childhood amnesia and childhood and death...[T]he work merits the serious study of both philosophers and students in such more practical professional fields as education and child psychology.
Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health - John J. Defrancesco
[Matthews] illustrates his thesis with poignant and incisive vignettes. His is a compelling argument for establishing the philosophy of childhood as an academic area of inquiry in which to explore how children think, listen, and reason. This interesting, readable book should appeal to anyone who works with children.
Boston Globe

The mind of the child...concerns Gareth Matthews' eloquent and thoughtful essays in The Philosophy of Childhood...In this book he raises a question...Do the philosophical sensibilities of children have any serious value? Or are they of no value because they come from immature minds? Matthews' view is that children's philosophical interests are not only valuable and profound but also are sadly perishable...[He] writes that adults who would do philosophy have much to learn from children.

— David Mehegan

Philosophical Quarterly

The Philosophy of Childhood is an attractive and thought-provoking work which also opens up territory which has seldom, if ever, been explored, for example, on childhood amnesia and childhood and death...[T]he work merits the serious study of both philosophers and students in such more practical professional fields as education and child psychology.

— David Carr

New York Times Book Review

Matthews' guided dialogues with children show that they consistently and happily develop philosophical trains of thought, evaluate those of others, and try to think things through, often reaching solutions that are essentially the ones propounded by the big people who are lucky enough to be paid for doing it...With careful listening and without distorting preconceptions about what children might or might not be capable of doing, Mr. Matthews has unearthed a seam of would-be wisdom. His open-minded attention to the way children's minds work has also yielded a new concept of childhood intelligence that may bear on the question of children's rights, children's art and the status of literature for children. He argues that the philosophy of childhood should be a respectable branch of philosophy, like the philosophy of science or the philosophy of law. This strikes me as too modest a goal. Mr. Matthews' incisive investigations into the relations between the world of children and the world of adults are too thought-provoking to be confined to one branch of one academic subject...He subjects Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development and Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development to simple and searching criticisms that make his book essential reading for anybody interested in early childhood education.

— Anthony Gottlieb

Times Educational Supplement

A stimulating work, worthy of attention.

— Nicholas Tucker

The Philosopher
This is a very interesting book written in a clear and straightforward style suitable for the layman and beginner as well as the professional philosopher...It is essentially about human rights, and insofar as it addresses the issue of the childlike nature of engaging in philosophy itself, it will surely contain something of interest for all philosophers.
Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health

[Matthews] illustrates his thesis with poignant and incisive vignettes. His is a compelling argument for establishing the philosophy of childhood as an academic area of inquiry in which to explore how children think, listen, and reason. This interesting, readable book should appeal to anyone who works with children.
— John J. DeFrancesco, Ph.D.

Theory and Psychology

As overriding themes, he voices his clear opinion that both the study of children's philosophical thinking and the philosophy of childhood should be legitimate not only to our understanding of children, but also to our own ways of thinking…Matthews' book serves as a compelling reminder of the humanity of our co-participants in the study of human development.
— Lucien T. Winegar

Boston Globe
The mind of the child...concerns Gareth Matthews' eloquent and thoughtful essays in The Philosophy of Childhood...In this book he raises a question...Do the philosophical sensibilities of children have any serious value? Or are they of no value because they come from immature minds? Matthews' view is that children's philosophical interests are not only valuable and profound but also are sadly perishable...[He] writes that adults who would do philosophy have much to learn from children.

— David Mehegan

Philosophical Quarterly
The Philosophy of Childhood is an attractive and thought-provoking work which also opens up territory which has seldom, if ever, been explored, for example, on childhood amnesia and childhood and death...[T]he work merits the serious study of both philosophers and students in such more practical professional fields as education and child psychology.

— David Carr

New York Times Book Review
Matthews' guided dialogues with children show that they consistently and happily develop philosophical trains of thought, evaluate those of others, and try to think things through, often reaching solutions that are essentially the ones propounded by the big people who are lucky enough to be paid for doing it...With careful listening and without distorting preconceptions about what children might or might not be capable of doing, Mr. Matthews has unearthed a seam of would-be wisdom. His open-minded attention to the way children's minds work has also yielded a new concept of childhood intelligence that may bear on the question of children's rights, children's art and the status of literature for children. He argues that the philosophy of childhood should be a respectable branch of philosophy, like the philosophy of science or the philosophy of law. This strikes me as too modest a goal. Mr. Matthews' incisive investigations into the relations between the world of children and the world of adults are too thought-provoking to be confined to one branch of one academic subject...He subjects Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development and Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development to simple and searching criticisms that make his book essential reading for anybody interested in early childhood education.

— Anthony Gottlieb

Times Educational Supplement
A stimulating work, worthy of attention.

— Nicholas Tucker

The Philosopher
This is a very interesting book written in a clear and straightforward style suitable for the layman and beginner as well as the professional philosopher...It is essentially about human rights, and insofar as it addresses the issue of the childlike nature of engaging in philosophy itself, it will surely contain something of interest for all philosophers.
Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health
[Matthews] illustrates his thesis with poignant and incisive vignettes. His is a compelling argument for establishing the philosophy of childhood as an academic area of inquiry in which to explore how children think, listen, and reason. This interesting, readable book should appeal to anyone who works with children.
— John J. DeFrancesco, Ph.D.
Theory and Psychology
As overriding themes, he voices his clear opinion that both the study of children's philosophical thinking and the philosophy of childhood should be legitimate not only to our understanding of children, but also to our own ways of thinking…Matthews' book serves as a compelling reminder of the humanity of our co-participants in the study of human development.
— Lucien T. Winegar
Booknews
Matthews (philosophy, U. of Massachusetts) explores children's philosophical potential and childhood as an area of philosophical inquiry. He examines adult preconceptions about the mental life of children, Piaget's theories, moral development, children's rights, literature for children, and childhood art. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674664814
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/1996
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 148
  • Product dimensions: 0.34 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 8.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Gareth B. Matthews is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Getting the Idea

1. A Philosopher's View of Childhood

2. Theories and Models of Childhood

3. Piaget and Philosophy

4. Piaget and Conservation

5. Moral Development

6. Children's Rights

7. Childhood Amnesia

8. Childhood and Death

9. Literature for Children

10. Child Art

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)