The Philosophy of Neo-Noir / Edition 1

The Philosophy of Neo-Noir / Edition 1

4.0 2
by Mark T. Conard
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0813124220

ISBN-13: 9780813124223

Pub. Date: 09/17/2010

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

In The Philosophy of Neo-Noir, Mark T. Conard and an ensemble of contributors investigate the genre of neo-noir and the philosophical questions about humanity that it explores. While most neo-noir does not exhibit the techniques of classic noir, including the tilted camera angles, skewed scene compositions, and interplay between darkness and light, the contributors

Overview

In The Philosophy of Neo-Noir, Mark T. Conard and an ensemble of contributors investigate the genre of neo-noir and the philosophical questions about humanity that it explores. While most neo-noir does not exhibit the techniques of classic noir, including the tilted camera angles, skewed scene compositions, and interplay between darkness and light, the contributors demonstrate how it addresses and expands upon many of the same philosophical concerns-guilt, redemption, the essence of human nature, and problems of knowledge,, memory, and identity. Neo-noir, with its blurred concepts of right and wrong and consistent themes of ambiguity and disillusionment, illuminates the human struggle for self discovery and moral orientation. Conard asserts that neo-noir explores philosophical thought to an even greater degree than its predecessor, as it is able to draw upon its classic noir inspirations while also investigating new avenues of philosophical thought and cinematic expression.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813124223
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
Publication date:
09/17/2010
Series:
The Philosophy of Popular Culture
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
222
Product dimensions:
0.63(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction 1

Part 1 Subjectivity, Knowledge, and Human Nature in Neo-Noir

Space, Time, and Subjectivity in Neo-Noir Cinema Jerold J. Abrams 7

Blade Runner and Sartre: The Boundaries of Humanity Judith Barad 21

John Locke, Personal Identity, and Memento Basil Smith 35

Problems of Memory and Identity in Neo-Noir's Existentialist Antihero Andrew Spicer 47

Part 2 Justice, Guilt, and Redemption: Morality in Neo-Noir

The Murder of Moral Idealism: Kant and the Death of Ian Campbell in The Onion Field Douglas L. Berger 67

Justice and Moral Corruption in A Simple Plan Aeon J. Skoble 83

"Saint" Sydney: Atonement and Moral Inversion in Hard Eight Donald R. D'Aries Foster Hirsch 91

Reservoir Dogs: Redemption in a Postmodern World Mark T. Canard 101

Part 3 Elements of Neo-Noir

The Dark Sublimity of Chinatown Richard Gilmore 119

The Human Comedy Perpetuates Itself: Nihilism and Comedy in Coen Neo-Noir Thomas S. Hibbs 137

The New Sincerity of Neo-Noir: The Example of The Man Who Wasn't There R. Barton Palmer 151

"Anything Is Possible Here": Capitalism, Neo-Noir, and Chinatown Jeanne Schuler and Patrick Murray 167

Sunshine Noir: Postmodernism and Miami Vice Steven M. Sanders 183

Contributors 203

Index 207

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Philosophy Of Neo-Noir 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Henry_Berry More than 1 year ago
Neo-noir films incorporated the visual style, characterizations, and subject matter of the classic film noir of the 1940s and '50s. But this latter film genre was able to employ more advanced film techniques and with the replacement of the moralistic Production Code with the more flexible modern ratings system, neo-noir film was able to add new dimensions of subject and visual matter. The 1974 'Chinatown' may be 'the first authentic neo-noir,' writes Richard Gilmore, professor of philosophy at a Minnesota college. The TV program 'Miami Vice'--first program, September 1984--was set in the Great Miami area for its 'cycle of decline, decay, development, and renewal (invariably followed by further repetitions of the cycle) [which] affirmed the indeterminacy and contingency of the postmodern noir,' as Stevens Sanders, emeritus professor of philosophy at a Massachusetts university writes. Thirteen essays by these and other philosophy professors relate neo-noir films not only to the film noir which preceded them, but also philosophical thoughts and ethical perspectives of Sartre, Plato, Kant, Kierkegaard, Marx, and others. Blade Runner, L. A. Confidential, The Onion Field, Parallax View, Dances With Wolves, and Raiders of the Lost Arc are among the films analyzed as neo-noir or which contain elements of this genre. This collection of essays is a companion of the editor Conard's 'The Philosophy of Film Noir.'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago