Photo Booth

( 1 )

Overview

He wanted to change the past, but first he would have to alter the future...

A new deadly drug is about to flood the streets of New York City. The police have no leads on who is producing the drug, or where it is coming from. As far as Praveer Rajani, a reckless Interpol agent, is concerned the only way to prevent countless deaths lies in a handful of mysterious photographs.

Within the photographs, Praveer can see images of places he has never ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $4.46   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

He wanted to change the past, but first he would have to alter the future...

A new deadly drug is about to flood the streets of New York City. The police have no leads on who is producing the drug, or where it is coming from. As far as Praveer Rajani, a reckless Interpol agent, is concerned the only way to prevent countless deaths lies in a handful of mysterious photographs.

Within the photographs, Praveer can see images of places he has never known, and people he has long forgotten. But what are the photographs leading him to? Is Praveer being told that his life is spiraling out of control, and he now has one chance to put things right?

Or are the photographs related to a murder that Praveer is desperate to solve? Perhaps they are showing the love that his brother, Jayendra, let slip away or even the family that his sister, Nisha, wants back?

The mystery will finally be solved in this exciting romantic thriller from Campfire.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The arrival of a major drug shipment sends an Interpol agent on the hunt for the man responsible for killing his parents in this jumbled revenge tale. Agent Praveer Rajani, considered a valuable asset but a loose cannon by his boss, is on hand when Interpol and the FBI intercept a drug buy in New York at an abandoned fairground. During the raid, Praveer sees an old photo booth, identical to one that he visited as a child with his brother and sister. Much of the story is told in full-color flashback—the present-day action is in black-and-white, with only blood inked in red—recounting how Praveer's parents were killed in a hit-and-run, and he and his younger sister were raised by his older brother, Jayendra. Back in the present, Praveer is positive that a long-ago photo hides a clue to the ringleader of the drug gang as well as to the identity of the man who killed his parents. While Nagar's art is stunning, the story lacks either logic or a satisfying arc. (June)
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Interpol agent Praveer Rajani's emotional baggage is having a serious impact on his life. His parents were killed in a car crash years earlier, and the driver responsible was never caught. He has difficulty controlling his temper, and only recently had his job reinstated. While working on a drug bust, he sees an old photo booth that brings back memories, but it is a while before readers understand this subplot. The story moves back and forth between different time periods and focuses on many characters including Praveer, his brother Jayendra, their sister Nisha, and Jayendra's girlfriend Shalini. This is occasionally confusing, as readers at first expect that Praveer is the main character but then the story detours into Jayendra's life for so long that he seems to be the focus instead. About halfway through the book, readers learn about the photo booth itself, and about how the pictures that the siblings had taken there changed their lives. Nagar's illustrations are in color for the modern segments and in black-and-white for many of the flashbacks. Praveer's temper tantrums are ridiculously portrayed (no one's face should become that comically distorted unless he's a manga character), and teens will have trouble identifying with him while thinking that he needs a psychiatric evaluation.—Andrea Lipinski, New York Public Library
From the Publisher
"This is a well paced, well produced, well characterised story which grips until the end, and is a highly recommended comic-book thriller. Sachin Nagar’s artwork is excellent, and the the book is well produced... Campfire is an Indian based publisher new to me who seem to have a fantastic range of original graphic novels and adaptations of classics. If this is typical of their output, then anyone interested in extending their range of graphic novels should look into them."

School Librarian

"I highly recommend Campfire’s comics. They do what they are intended to do and do it in  a way that excites kids about classic literature."

— Chris Wilson, The Graphic Classroom (a resource for teachers and librarians)

School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Interpol agent Praveer Rajani's emotional baggage is having a serious impact on his life. His parents were killed in a car crash years earlier, and the driver responsible was never caught. He has difficulty controlling his temper, and only recently had his job reinstated. While working on a drug bust, he sees an old photo booth that brings back memories, but it is a while before readers understand this subplot. The story moves back and forth between different time periods and focuses on many characters including Praveer, his brother Jayendra, their sister Nisha, and Jayendra's girlfriend Shalini. This is occasionally confusing, as readers at first expect that Praveer is the main character but then the story detours into Jayendra's life for so long that he seems to be the focus instead. About halfway through the book, readers learn about the photo booth itself, and about how the pictures that the siblings had taken there changed their lives. Nagar's illustrations are in color for the modern segments and in black-and-white for many of the flashbacks. Praveer's temper tantrums are ridiculously portrayed (no one's face should become that comically distorted unless he's a manga character), and teens will have trouble identifying with him while thinking that he needs a psychiatric evaluation.—Andrea Lipinski, New York Public Library
Kirkus Reviews

An intriguing—though fussily intricate—premise is hampered by an unfortunately disjointed execution.

Against a grim, sketchy black-and-white backdrop enters the brooding, chiseled Praveer Rajani. Rajani, an Interpol agent, has just made a huge drug bust at a carnival. While leaving the scene, he sees a photo booth that jars memories of his childhood 20 years ago and his parents' untimely demise. Abruptly, the entire setting changes, jumping back two decades and exploding in bright, jarring colors within structured panels. Nagar quickly abandons the dark, bleak setting and changes character perspective from Praveer to his older brother, Jayendra. After their parents' death, Jayendra steps in as his family's caretaker, though this ultimately costs him his relationship with Shalini, the love of his life. At a carnival, the Rajanis discover a mystical photo booth that can show the heart's true desires. Impulsively, Jayendra uproots the family, taking them abroad to win back Shalini and discovering a startling coincidence about their parents. Just as suddenly, the setting changes back to the future and Praveer's point of view, neatly tying the elements of his family's past to the recent drug bust. Overall, this lacks cohesion and feels choppy, moving discordantly between the darkly noir and sweetly magical settings.

Ambitiously constructed but ultimately falling short. (Graphic fiction. 14 & up)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789380028651
  • Publisher: Steerforth Press
  • Publication date: 6/21/2011
  • Series: Campfire Graphic Novels Series
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 535,758
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Lewis Helfand was born on April 27, 1978 in Philadelphia. With a political science degree and a passion for comic books, Lewis's first comic book was Wasted Minute, the story of a world without crime where superheroes are forced to work regular jobs. With the first issue well received, he was soon collaborating with other artists and released four more issues over the next few years. Lewis continues to work as a freelance writer and reporter for a number of national print and online publications.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    Short story

    Nice story,wasn't expecting pictured caption style book. Worth the time to read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)