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Photographer Mole
     

Photographer Mole

5.0 1
by Dennis Haseley, Juli Kangas (Illustrator), Juli Kangas (Translator)
 

Everyone in town loves Photographer Mole. He's always ready with his camera on important occasions, and his fine photographs hang in every home. But Mole isn't satisfied. Something is missing&150in his photos, and in his life. So he sets off in search of it . . . and returns with a joyful surprise for his friends.

Life is much more than just watching from behind

Overview

Everyone in town loves Photographer Mole. He's always ready with his camera on important occasions, and his fine photographs hang in every home. But Mole isn't satisfied. Something is missing&150in his photos, and in his life. So he sets off in search of it . . . and returns with a joyful surprise for his friends.

Life is much more than just watching from behind a camera, and readers will rejoice as Mole discovers this truth in a book that overflows with charm and timeless beauty. Newcomer Juli Kangas makes a remarkable debut here, masterfully bringing to life Dennis Haseley's winning text.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
A picturesque, old-fashioned English-village setting evoked in loving detail instantly invites readers into Haseley's (A Story for Bear) sweet-natured animal tale. Bespectacled, bowler-hat-wearing Mole is a busy portrait photographer. The serious countenances of sheep, porcupines and pigs peer out from old fashioned black-and-white portraits hanging against sprightly patterned wallpaper in Mole's studio and the many homes in which he dines: "He was a popular guest... [and] told entertaining stories about the challenges of his work: how the Rabbits needed quiet so as not to be jumpy, and that the Pigs looked their best in the soft glow of sunset." Despite his full schedule, Mole feels something is missing from his life, and he sets out to find it (he returns with a wife). At first glance, Kangas's (the Furry Pal board books) watercolor-and-oil washes of handsomely costumed animals look like a cross between Rosemary Wells and Beatrix Potter; closer perusal shows distinctive, cunning touches, e.g., lawyerly geese wear bow ties and waistcoats; the flounces of a rabbit's green dress resemble lettuce leaves. Muted hues reflect Mole's understated demeanor, while the changing perspectives of double spreads and half-page illustrations add rhythm without undercutting the nostalgic mood. Ages 4-up. (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Back in time we go, to the era of the official town photographer who, holding flash powder, has his head tucked under the black cloth of his standing camera. These town folk are charming anthropomorphic animals dressed nattily in period costumes. Mole, the photographer, successfully photographs all the important occasions. But he feels that something is missing from his life, and from his pictures. Although his subjects insist that the photos are fine, Mole takes off in search of what is lacking. Folks worry about him until he finally returns, bringing with him the answer to his quest, his bride-to-be. His photos afterward are filled with himself and his happy family. Kangas's naturalistic ink, watercolor and oil wash scenes provide detailed period settings for the low-key groupings of believably appealing animals expressing satisfaction with Mole's work, puzzlement and sadness at his departure, and anticipation upon his return. The final pages display an array of photographs of the happy, growing Mole family. There is a moral here, of course, but the story works without it. 2004, Dial Books for Young Readers/Penguin Young Readers Group, Ages 4 to 8.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Mole, the beloved town photographer, commemorates all the local special occasions from Commander Bear's birthday to the Pig reunion with pictures, and his entertaining stories about work behind the lens make him one of the town's most popular dinner guests. Still, as he looks from his portraits to his animated subjects, he realizes that something is missing. Frustrated, he decides to go on a journey to figure it out. After much searching, a special someone who makes him smile helps Mole realize what his somber portraits lack. In the end, Mole gets to be in the picture himself (a trick he learned on his travels) instead of always being a bystander. Haseley's heartwarming story will strike just the right chord with readers and will spark speculation about what is missing and why. Kangas's muted watercolor and oil-wash illustrations feature many old-fashioned details and make a nice accompaniment to the sweet and gentle text. Kids especially repulsed by love and mush may be turned off, but Mole's plight and journey to happiness will bring a smile to many listeners' faces.-Julie Roach, Malden Public Library, MA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Mole's fine portraits and photographs of family gatherings and special events hang in every home and office in his quaint, 19th-century, English-looking country town. While everyone thinks his work is excellent, Mole's unsatisfied and can't quite understand what's missing. Much to the dismay, chagrin, and disappointment of his loving and caring neighbors, Mole temporarily closes his shop and leaves town to do some soul-searching. In his absence, much happens that isn't captured on film-the Sheep Jubilee, the Bulldog Reunion. Finally, upon his return, Mole is eagerly met by his friends the Porcupines, the Rabbits, and the Lawyer Swans, and descends from the train with a new bride-to-be, thus adding the missing detail to his life. This story of inner loneliness illustrated with full-page paintings in ink, watercolor, and oil wash, reflects an era of cobblestone streets, rolling green hills, red clay-tiled roofed cottages, and a menagerie of characters dressed in period clothing. The notion of balancing a successful career with family and home may be lost on youngsters; however this historical vignette is quite pleasing and intriguing all the same. (Picture book. 5-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803729247
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/03/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.26(w) x 10.28(h) x 0.38(d)
Lexile:
AD780L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Photographer Mole 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Photographer Mole is funny colorful, great story, full of adventures and moments for all to read and enjoy. You need to buy the book and keep it for the kids.