The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos

The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos

3.3 26
by Michael Freeman
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0240809343

ISBN-13: 9780240809342

Pub. Date: 05/28/2007

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Design is the single most important factor in creating a successful photograph. The ability to see the potential for a strong picture and then organize the graphic elements into an effective, compelling composition has always been one of the key skills in making photographs.

Digital photography has brought a new, exciting aspect to design - first because the

Overview

Design is the single most important factor in creating a successful photograph. The ability to see the potential for a strong picture and then organize the graphic elements into an effective, compelling composition has always been one of the key skills in making photographs.

Digital photography has brought a new, exciting aspect to design - first because the instant feedback from a digital camera allows immediate appraisal and improvement; and second because image-editing tools make it possible to alter and enhance the design after the shutter has been pressed. This has had a profound effect on the way digital photographers take pictures.

Now published in sixteen languages, The Photographer's Eye continues to speak to photographers everywhere. Reaching 100,000 copies in print in the US alone, and 300,000+ worldwide, it shows how anyone can develop the ability to see and shoot great digital photographs. The book explores all the traditional approaches to composition and design, but crucially, it also addresses the new digital technique of shooting in the knowledge that a picture will later be edited, manipulated, or montaged to result in a final image that may be very different from the one seen in the viewfinder.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780240809342
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
05/28/2007
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
126,525
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

The Image Frame; Design Basics; Graphic Elements; Composing with Color; Using Design

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The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Jeff10ct1 More than 1 year ago
Although this book has a ton of information on designing a photograph, it was a little too technical for my taste. In my opinion, this book is geared more towards advanced photographers, or those who have taken at least some college courses in photography. I do consider myself to be quite intelligent, but some of the topics coverd in this book went way over my head - as I am basically a self-taught, amature photographer. I plan on revisiting the book in another year or two, after I have gained more knowledge, to see if it makes more sense at that time. So, if you have a good handle on the technical side of photography, then this book is an excellent addition. If you're a beginner, this book might be a little too technical.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Photographer¿s Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos, Michael Freeman. Right, I¿ve been trying to write this review for a week now, and failing miserably. Although the subtitle is ¿Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos,¿ most of the concepts presented seem to be just as applicable to film photography as digital. Although Freeman mentions some of the adjustments that can be made with digital post-processing, the only one covered in any depth is cropping, as the focus of ¿The Photographer¿s Eye¿ is in composition and design during the actual picture-taking process. Likewise, while the effect of the actual cameras is discussed - as in the height/width ratio of the frame, effect of wide-angle vs. telephoto lenses on depth of field, etc. - the technical aspects of photography are not covered. The primary focus of the book is on the artistic aspects of photography - the effect of different types or shapes of line on how your eye moves around the picture, light and color as it affects mood, etc. Each concept is covered on a pair of well-illustrated facing pages, with a few more complex topics meriting two or three spreads. Although I found some of the examples a little weak 'see page photo of Y on page X, and there are *5* photos of Y there, none of which quite match the description', I could follow the point, and they all made sense. Although there are more illustrations than text, it took me quite a while to go through it. I think because there is just so much information packed into ¿The Photographer¿s Eye,¿ that going through more than a few topics at a time would lead to information-overload. Overall, it is a very good book, and I would recommend it to anyone, photographer or not, who wanted to learn more about composition and artistic design.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a very useful book. However, the book is not particularly easy to read. This probably due to the artistic nature of the subject matter covering abstract, intangible concepts like the dynamic properties of graphic elements, etc. I found that if read carefully (more than once if necessary) the book does offer a great deal on insight. It's helped me recognize potential shots in a sea of graphically confusing details.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Within the first 20 pages four photographs were missing. The text had potential, but I'm not sure that a book on photographic composition with missing pictures is that helpful. On the plus side, B & N agreed to give me a refund. I'll update if I don't get my money. I may buy print edition.
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