The Photographer's Guide to Color Management: Professional Techniques for Consistent Results [NOOK Book]

Overview

Today's digital photography workflow includes multiple devices-cameras, scanners, monitors, software, printers, and more-that can all perceive, display, or render the same color differently. As a result, it is not uncommon for photographers to fall into the trap of altering what looks great on screen in order to produce a good print. This can lead to printing, image editing, printing again, editing again, etc.-until the print looks right. This is a huge waste of time, not to ...
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The Photographer's Guide to Color Management: Professional Techniques for Consistent Results

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Overview

Today's digital photography workflow includes multiple devices-cameras, scanners, monitors, software, printers, and more-that can all perceive, display, or render the same color differently. As a result, it is not uncommon for photographers to fall into the trap of altering what looks great on screen in order to produce a good print. This can lead to printing, image editing, printing again, editing again, etc.-until the print looks right. This is a huge waste of time, not to mention a waste of ink and paper.

Even if you are seeing a close match between display and printout in your immediate work environment, what happens when you hand your file to your client for display on their computer? Or to a service provider that might be making prints for you? What is the guarantee that what your client sees will be what you see on your computer screen? How are you going to ensure that your print service is going to be able to deliver prints that will match your colors? Color-management processes are utilized to eliminate these kinds of problems and to provide consistent, predictable results as a photograph moves through the workflow, meeting the expectations of the photographer and everyone else involved in the process.

Features: Understanding the importance of an extended color-management workflow when working with clients and service providers, Mastering basic color-management concepts, like color models, color spaces, and color gamuts, Choosing the hardware and software needed to establish a color-managed workflow, Establishing system-level and application-level color-management protocols, Understanding ICC profiles-where to get them (or how to create them), where they live on yourcomputer, and how to use them, Creating input profiles for your digital camera and scanner, Calibrating and profiling your computer display, including tips for testing your results, Techniques for outputting images for process printing, the Internet, or inkjet printers, Using soft- and hard-proofing to quickly check the accuracy of your work and avoid costly color problems, Establishing an optimal work environment for color-critical imaging tasks, Tips for avoiding common color-management pitfalls and for working with clients who are not color-management savvy.

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Editorial Reviews

PCPhoto
Learn how to maintain consistent color management of your images throughout workflow on multiple devices-including cameras, scanners, monitors, software, printers and more.
SciTech Book News
Illustrated text walks the reader through color-management concepts, software setup, and how to build and work through a color-managed workflow.
From the Publisher

"Learn how to maintain consistent color management of your images throughout workflow on multiple devices—including cameras, scanners, monitors, software, printers and more."  —PCPhoto

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781584283676
  • Publisher: Amherst Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/1/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 128
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author


Phil Nelson is a professional photographer and a consultant and trainer with GretaMacbeth Global Services, a premier supplier of digital color management solutions. He lives in Stamford, Connecticut.
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Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     5
About the Author     6
Foreword     7
Introduction     8
The Challenges of Digital Photography     8
Building a Digital Photography Workflow     8
Why Color Management?     11
The Color Problem     11
The Extended Photography Workflow: Working with Clients and Service Providers     12
Relying on Service Providers     12
Working with Clients Who Don't Understand Color Management     12
The Benefits of Color Management     13
Predictable Color     13
Reduced Waste of Media and Time     16
Improved Communication with Members of the Extended Workflow     13
Real World Expectations: The Colors Will Not Always Match!     16
Certain Devices Cannot Perceive, Display, or Render All the Colors in Your Image     16
Aspects of the Workspace Can Negatively Impact Color Perception     16
Outside Services Cannot Always "Get It Right"     17
The Objective of This Book     17
Preview: A Color-Managed Workflow     18
A Typical Workflow: No Color Management     18
A Typical Color-Managed Workflow     19
Color-Management Concepts     22
RGB and CMYK Color Models     22
RGB     23
CMYK     23
The Color Space and Color Gamut     24
Device-Dependent Color Space     24
Different Devices Define the Same Color Differently     24
Device-Independent Color Space     25
The Importance of Device-Independent Color     26
Lab Color     26
Profile Connection Spaces     27
ICC Color Profiles     27
Working Spaces     28
Color-Management Methods     31
Application-Level Color Management     31
System-Level Color Management     31
Assigning Color Meaning vs. Converting Color Data     32
Assigning a Profile     32
Converting to a Color Space     33
Rendering Intents     35
Relative Colorimetric     36
Absolute Colorimetric     36
Perceptual     37
Saturation     37
Embedding Profiles     37
Software Setup     38
Define a Standard Working Space and Source-to-Destination Conversions     38
Where Do ICC Profiles Come From?     39
Device Manufacturers, Application Developers, Paper Manufacturers     39
Profile Services     40
Build Your Own     40
Where Do ICC Profiles Live?     41
Macintosh     41
Windows     41
System-Level Color Management: Setting Up     41
Macintosh     41
Windows     42
Shortcomings of System-Level Color Management     43
Application-Level Color Management: Setting Up     44
Color Settings in Photoshop CS2     44
Setting Up Phase One Capture One Pro     47
Building a Color-Managed Workflow     50
What Is Needed?     50
Hardware for Setting Up Color Management     50
Software for Setting Up Color Management     51
Device Calibration vs. Profiling     51
Calibration     51
Display Calibration and Profiling     52
Types of Displays     52
Display Calibration     53
White Point     55
Gamma     56
Luminance     56
Display Profiling     56
Testing Your Calibration and Profile     57
Creating Input Profiles     58
Digital Cameras     59
Raw Files      59
Jpeg and Tiff Files     63
Scanners     68
Creating Output Profiles     71
Inkjet Printer     74
Building RGB and CMYK Output Profiles     76
Media Type     82
Walking Through the Color-Management Workflow     83
Inputting Images     83
The Digital Camera Workflow     83
Raw Files     83
Jpeg/Tiff Files     83
The Scanning Workflow     84
Outputting Images     87
Graphic Design/Prepress     88
Worldwide Web     88
Inkjet Printer     88
Outputting to a Rip     90
Raw Converters that Print     91
Common Pitfalls     92
Redundant Conversion     92
Printer Presets     93
Assigning the Monitor's Profile     93
Proofing     94
Final Output Device (FOD) Profile     95
Soft-Proofing     95
Gamut Warning     101
Hard-Proofing     104
Rips that Proof     109
The Work Environment     110
ISO 3664     110
Room Lighting     110
Evaluating Prints     113
Practical Appraisal     113
Critical Color Matching     114
The Color-Critical Workstation     114
The Extended Workflow     116
Working with Photo Labs     118
Preparing Images for Clients     119
Clarify the RGB Color Space     119
Get an ICC Profile     119
Web Images     120
File Format     120
Converting and Embedding     120
Web References     122
Index     123
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