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Photographic Atlas of the Body

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Overview

A dramatic pictorial tour.

The desire to see and understand the inner workings of our bodies starts at an early age. The curiosity to glimpse what happens inside the body's systems, organs and even the brain is a continuing scientific quest.

The magnificent illustrations in Photographic Atlas of the Body are created by imaging technologies and the latest scientific methods. Dramatic close-up photography of human anatomy is combined with clear, descriptive text to explain the human body's functions and inner workings.

The images of Photographic Atlas of the Body are organized in five major sections:

  • Imaging Techniques
  • Cells
  • Biological systems
  • Tissues
  • Brain and Senses.

Each section opens with a clearly written introductory essay. Vivid, full-page images follow, each with a simple pictogram identifying the location and concise captions explaining the body part's function and significance.

Sixteen types of imaging instruments and techniques are explained including:

  • X-ray and radioactive (Barium meal)
  • CAT scan
  • MRI, SEM, TEM, NMR
  • Optical and microscopy
  • Acoustic and ultrasound.

Each of these methods creates a unique portrait of the unseen world within each of us.

Photographic Atlas of the Body is a valuable guide to, and reference for, the internal workings of the body.

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Editorial Reviews

The Medical Post
Microscopic views taken by various imaging technology that capture the beauty of the inner workings of the human body.
Wisconsin State Journal
Incredible.
— William R. Wineke
Stuff Magazine
Amazing microscopic images.
Louisville Courier-Journal
The photos are spellbinding. The intricacies of the human body are rendered so beautifully that the book gives new meaning to the words "flesh and blood."
Science Books and Films
Chosen as one of the "Best Books for Junior High and Young Adult 2005" by Science Books and Films.
Books in Canada
Breathtaking for the beauty and wonderousness of all that they reveal... miraculous universe that is the human body.
— Olga Stein
Salem Statesman-Journal
Huge, entertaining, informative, startling, rich, exciting and a true source of genuine awe.
— Dan Hays
Hartford Courant
A sophisticated and stunning mixture of art and science.
— Carole Goldberg
Canadian Camera
Stunning close-ups exploring the physical world within us... I was frequently stopped in my tracks by the sense of drama.
— Joy McDonell
Wisconsin State Journal - William R. Wineke
Incredible.
Science Books and Films - Nikki L. Rogers
Wonderfully entertaining... brilliantly detailed, full-color images... an interesting and beautiful book.
Books in Canada - Olga Stein
The pictures are breathtaking for the beauty and wonderousness of all that they reveal going on at various levels of our physical life... miraculous universe that is the human body.
Salem Statesman-Journal - Dan Hays
Huge, entertaining, informative, startling, rich, exciting and a true source of genuine awe.
Hartford Courant - Carole Goldberg
A sophisticated and stunning mixture of art and science.
Canadian Camera - Joy McDonell
250 stunning close-ups exploring the physical world within us... I was frequently stopped in my tracks by the sense of drama.
Library Journal
Presenting more than 200 images from the United Kingdom-based stock agency Science Photo Library, this book offers stunning, magnified views of human cells and tissue. Red blood cells pushing through an artery and calcium carbonate crystals on a balancing stone within an inner ear are just a sampling of the interior views represented by the beautiful color micrographs that make up this collection. An elucidating overview of the scope and power of imaging techniques addresses light microscopy (maximum magnification of 1250), electron microscopy (maximum magnification of one million times), and X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. All of the images are accompanied by concise, fact-filled descriptions that serve as travel guides in this tour of the body. Including a foreword by Baroness Susan Greenfield targeted to YAs, this oversized, nontechnical introduction is suitable for large public libraries.-Sara Rutter, Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa Lib. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552979730
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/2/2004
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 10.25 (w) x 13.50 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Greenfield, who rote the foreword for Photographic Atlas of the Body, became the first female director of the Royal Institution of Great Britain in 1998, and in January 2000 was awarded the CBE for her services to the public understanding of science.

Greenfield obtained her Ph.D. from the University Department of Pharmacology at Oxford University, England and went on to undertake research at Collège de France, Paris, and New York University Medical Center. She has received 18 honorary degrees and is a professor of pharmacology at the University of Oxford.

She has made numerous radio and television appearances, and she is the author of The Private Life the Brain and The Human Brain: A Guided Tour.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
by Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE

Imaging techniques

CELLS

  • Typical human cells
  • Inside cells
  • Cell cycles
TISSUES
  • Epithelial tissue
  • Supporting and connecting tissue
  • Muscle tissue
SYSTEMS
  • Skeletal system
  • Digestive system
  • Urinary system
  • Circulatory system
  • Respiratory system
  • Reproductive system
  • Nervous system
  • Immune system
  • Endocrine system
BRAIN AND SENSES
  • Brain
  • Hearing and balance
  • Smell and taste
  • Sight

Index

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Preface

Foreword

This book truly spans the science/art divide. Indeed, it goes one better: it shows how one can merge into the other. Science can actually be art, and in turn, in the exquisite and ultimate mechanisms and function of biology, there is an intrinsic beauty. The old images of scientist as dysfunctional nerds, and science being all about Bunsen burners, white coats, nasty smells and, above all, tedious facts, are being replaced by the excitement of gaining insights and understanding into how science is impacting on all aspects of daily life. But even if you have a complete distaste for the ways in which science can help with your daily life, at the aesthetic level alone this book should have a huge appeal.

These pages reveal your body, stripped down to its most basic components: the cells. And here you see them in huge diversity, dying, dividing or simply living., reflecting their vastly different functions. The images are startling, completely unprecedented and, above all, hugely absorbing. If you then press further and read what tissue each cell actually contributes, your insights will deepen even more. To view the banal parts of a human body — be it tooth enamel, or fat — as you have never seen them before is quite astounding. Moreover, you will come across cells and even areas of the body that you might rather not think about, such as the lining of the rectum, and find they actually look pleasingly a little like strawberries.

And then there are cells that are in the news, such as stem cells, as well as that most bizarre and secretive of organs: the human brain. Looking through the sections of the nervous system and the brain, I hope that you will be able to capture some of the excitement that I had when I was first a student, wondering how such quintessentially physical matter could generate subjective experiences such as personality.

Of course,
when I was a student, we did not have access to the wonderful scanning techniques listed in the next few pages, but which now enable us to have an unprecedented intimacy and insight into what makes you the person you are. By looking at human fat or a hairshaft, anyone of any age will have their respect for and wonderment of the human body enhanced. If, in addition, younger readers are inspired to realize that science is as exciting as it is indeed beautiful, and that old ideas are as erroneous as they are unattractive, then these pages will be even more valuable.

For anyone of any age, whether or not they are locked into the core curriculum, a few moments, or indeed hours, would be well spent looking through these pages and reflecting on how far we have come in terms of science, and how far we have to go still in understanding the most amazing machine, which is the human body. Someone once said that science is all about 'seeing what everyone else can see, but thinking what no-one else has thought.' This book will enable you to do just that.

Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE

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Introduction

Foreword

This book truly spans the science/art divide. Indeed, it goes one better: it shows how one can merge into the other. Science can actually be art, and in turn, in the exquisite and ultimate mechanisms and function of biology, there is an intrinsic beauty. The old images of scientist as dysfunctional nerds, and science being all about Bunsen burners, white coats, nasty smells and, above all, tedious facts, are being replaced by the excitement of gaining insights and understanding into how science is impacting on all aspects of daily life. But even if you have a complete distaste for the ways in which science can help with your daily life, at the aesthetic level alone this book should have a huge appeal.

These pages reveal your body, stripped down to its most basic components: the cells. And here you see them in huge diversity, dying, dividing or simply living., reflecting their vastly different functions. The images are startling, completely unprecedented and, above all, hugely absorbing. If you then press further and read what tissue each cell actually contributes, your insights will deepen even more. To view the banal parts of a human body -- be it tooth enamel, or fat -- as you have never seen them before is quite astounding. Moreover, you will come across cells and even areas of the body that you might rather not think about, such as the lining of the rectum, and find they actually look pleasingly a little like strawberries.

And then there are cells that are in the news, such as stem cells, as well as that most bizarre and secretive of organs: the human brain. Looking through the sections of the nervous system and the brain, I hope that you will beable to capture some of the excitement that I had when I was first a student, wondering how such quintessentially physical matter could generate subjective experiences such as personality.

Of course, when I was a student, we did not have access to the wonderful scanning techniques listed in the next few pages, but which now enable us to have an unprecedented intimacy and insight into what makes you the person you are. By looking at human fat or a hairshaft, anyone of any age will have their respect for and wonderment of the human body enhanced. If, in addition, younger readers are inspired to realize that science is as exciting as it is indeed beautiful, and that old ideas are as erroneous as they are unattractive, then these pages will be even more valuable.

For anyone of any age, whether or not they are locked into the core curriculum, a few moments, or indeed hours, would be well spent looking through these pages and reflecting on how far we have come in terms of science, and how far we have to go still in understanding the most amazing machine, which is the human body. Someone once said that science is all about 'seeing what everyone else can see, but thinking what no-one else has thought.' This book will enable you to do just that.

Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE

Read More Show Less

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