Photography in Japan 1853-1912

Overview

In a world where digital cameras and camera phones have become ubiquitous, looking back at a time period when this wasn't the case offers a distinctive insight. Photography in Japan 1853-1912 is a fascinating book that offers a unique visual record of Japan and its metamorphosis from feudal society to a modern, industrial nation at a time when the art of photography was still in its infancy.

This comprehensive and authoritative book begins with the opening of Japan to foreigners...

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Photography in Japan 1853 - 1912

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Overview

In a world where digital cameras and camera phones have become ubiquitous, looking back at a time period when this wasn't the case offers a distinctive insight. Photography in Japan 1853-1912 is a fascinating book that offers a unique visual record of Japan and its metamorphosis from feudal society to a modern, industrial nation at a time when the art of photography was still in its infancy.

This comprehensive and authoritative book begins with the opening of Japan to foreigners in 1853 when Commodore Matthew Perry compelled the reclusive nation to sign a treaty allowing access to Japan for the first time in over 250 years. Reluctantly at first, and then enthusiastically, Japan opened its doors to people and ideas, modernizing at a rate that was, and remains, unprecedented in human society. All of this was captured on camera. The 350 old and rare images in this book, many of them published here for the first time, not only chronicle the introduction of photography in Japan, but also demonstrate that early photographic images of Japan are vital in helping to understand the dramatic changes that occurred in mid-nineteenth century Japan. Taken between 1853 and 1912 by the most important local and foreign photographers working in Japan, the photographic images, whether sensational or everyday, intimate or panoramic, document a nation about to abandon its traditional ways and enter the modern age.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Writer Bennett crafted this beautiful and educational book from a collection of 350 old and rare images captured by Western photographers. This book offers a glimpse of life in Japan during one of its most dramatic periods in history."—Shutterbug

"Photography in Japan 1835–1912 took on a life of its own, and ended up falling into place as a true picture of photography in Japan, with all of its warts and formats shown in their ebb and flow during the first 60 years after the country came out of its centuries of sleep, and into the modern world...Readers who have a love for old photography in general, and stereo views specifically, will not be disappointed by this new portrait of old Japan." — Rob Oechsle, Stereo World magazine

"Impressive overview of the history of Japanese photography between 1853 and 1912...Bennett has been collecting and researching the pioneering years of Japanese photography for 25 years...Essential publication for everyone interested in early Japanese photography." — Society for Japanese Arts Newsletter, March 2007

"The extensive collection of valuable photographs in this book and its text might be described as a visual record of our native land during that period, a record that has been lost to us since so many early photographs left Japan. With this book, Mr. Bennett has performed a significant service in encouraging people today to reconsider those photographs' value." — Message announcing Photography in Japan 1853 - 1912 as the Winner of the 2007 International Award of the Photographic Society of Japan

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9784805313114
  • Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/5/2014
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 859,209
  • Product dimensions: 8.90 (w) x 11.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Author Terry Bennett, a British writer based in London, has been collecting and researching nineteenth-century Japanese, Chinese, and Korean photography for many years. His books include Early Japanese Images, Korea: Caught in Time and, with Hugh Cortazzi, Japan: Caught in Time.

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Table of Contents


Preface     5
Introduction: Photography Meets Japan     10
1850s: The First Images     22
The China Connection     25
Castaways: First Images of Japanese     26
Eliphalet Brown Jr     27
Edward Kern     29
Edward Edgerton     34
First Cameras, First Students     35
The Norwegian     36
A British Camera in Tokyo     38
Pierre Rossier     41
1860s: Western Studios Dominate     52
Samuel Brown     54
Francis Hall     57
Orrin Freeman     58
Ukai Gyokusen     60
John Wilson     62
Overseas Missions     63
Shimooka Renjo     69
Ueno Hikoma     73
Uchida Kuichi     76
Yokoyama Matsusaburo     82
Tomishige Rihei     84
Felix Beato     86
William Saunders     98
Charles Parker     102
Antoine Fauchery     104
Frederick Sutton     106
Wilhelm Burger     109
Milton Miller     112
Charles Weed     115
Other WesternPhotographers     116
Other Japanese Photographers     126
1870s: Japanese Competition     130
Baron Raimund von Stillfried-Ratenicz     133
The Gordes Brothers     142
John Reddie Black and The Far East     146
Michael Moser     150
Hermann Andersen     153
Baron Franz von Stillfried-Ratenicz     154
David Welsh     156
Other Western Photographers     158
Esaki Reiji     165
Suzuki Shinichi I     165
Suzuki Shinichi II     172
Usui Shusaburo     174
Nakajima Matsuchi     182
Ichida Sota     184
Yamamoto     186
Other Japanese Photographers     192
1880s: Western Studios Give Way     196
Tamamura Kozaburo     198
Kusakabe Kimbei     203
Ogawa Kazumasa     210
Other Japanese Photographers     217
Adolfo Farsari     219
Francis Guillemard     224
Other Western Photographers     227
1890s: Japanese Studios Dominate     230
Enami Tamotsu     232
Kajima Seibei     238
Ogawa Sashichi     241
Other Japanese Photographers     244
Henry Strohmeyer     246
Walter Clutterbuck     248
William Burton     252
Other Western Photographers     256
1900s: In Full Control     262
Herbert Ponting     265
Otis Poole     271
Arnold Genthe     274
Karl Lewis     276
James Ricalton     279
James Hare     286
Jack London     288
Other Western Photographers     290
Takagi Teijiro     294
Other Japanese Photographers     295
Epilogue     299
Endnotes     300
Negretti and Zambra China/Japan Stereoviews     305
Photographic Difficulties in 1860s Japan and China     306
Photographic Copyright Regulations in Japan, 1887     308
Chronology     308
Photographic Terms and Glossary     310
Bibliography     311
Index of Commercial and Amateur Photographers in Japan, 1853-1912     314
Acknowledgments     320
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