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Photos Framed: A Fresh Look at the World's Most Memorable Photographs
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Photos Framed: A Fresh Look at the World's Most Memorable Photographs

5.0 1
by Ruth Thomson, Various (Illustrator)
 
Portrait. Nature. Art. Documentary. A look at some of the world’s most iconic photographs invites viewers to focus on the medium’s place in art and history.

Photographs can be beautiful or harrowing, honest or manipulative, dramatic or comforting. Photos Framed explores twenty-seven of the most important and vivid photos taken over the

Overview

Portrait. Nature. Art. Documentary. A look at some of the world’s most iconic photographs invites viewers to focus on the medium’s place in art and history.

Photographs can be beautiful or harrowing, honest or manipulative, dramatic or comforting. Photos Framed explores twenty-seven of the most important and vivid photos taken over the medium’s history, from a formal portrait of Louis Daguerre taken in 1844 to a candid shot of a Cuban girl and her doll in 2011. Readers are invited to use their powers of observation to zoom in on photographic elements, blow up details of the subject matter, think about the big picture, and pan out on the photographer. Photos Framed will open viewers’ eyes to the art of photography and its power to tell a story.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The images are all intriguing and do much to capture the scope and cultural importance of photography as an art form as well as a documentary medium. A fine resource and excellent for even a casual perusal.
—Kirkus Reviews

Each beautiful reproduction is accompanied by a single facing page that includes title and date or work, photographer, two brief paragraphs of background on the image and its creator, "Blow Up" and "Zoom In" inset boxes, and a trio of open-ended questions to start the wheels turning. The springboard questions laudably avoid cookie-cutter formatting, focusing instead on attributes or puzzles unique to a particular work. The result is a wide-ranging set of inquiries.
—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

A brief introduction provides the framework for this slim book, which details 27 photographs under four thematic sections: portraits, nature, and documentary, and art images. Each quality, full-page reproduction sits opposite a page of information that includes a few facts (title, date, and name of the artist), along with a paragraph on the picture, noting its artistic or historical relevance, and one on the photographer discussing his/her medium, subjects, etc.
—School Library Journal

In this well-organized nonfiction text, Ruth Thompson provides readers with a visual journey through history. ... This is unquestionably an informative, well researched, and engaging nonfiction selection.
—Reading Today Online

An excellent introduction for young readers, artists and journalists to the surprising complexity of the simple snapshot.
—Virginian-Pilot

Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Taking a photograph today is about as easy as it can get, but it was not always that way. With an immense volume of photos taken daily, Thomson asks the reader to pause and take some time to think about the history of photography and the impact of images on our lives. She divides the book into four types of photographs and defines each one: portrait, nature, photography as art, and documentary. The first to be discussed is a portrait of Louis Daguerre taken in 1844, and the last is Martin Parr’s Barcelona, taken in 2011 showing a group of tourists — all with their phones and small cameras. Among the others are McCurry’s Afghan Girl, Muybridge’s The Horse in Motion, Warhol’s Marilyn Diptych, and Leifer’s Muhammad Ali versus Sonny Liston. Elsie Wright’s 1917 The Cottingley Fairies reminds readers that photographs can be doctored. Each two-page spread introduces the photo and the photographer and then asks three open-ended questions. Two small boxes called “Blow Up” and “Zoom In” (color-coded for the type of photography) encourage the reader to look at details in each of the pictures. Under each photograph is a quote from either the subject of the picture or the photographer. These quotes also encourage the reader to think more deeply about the purpose and impact of a picture. Teens will recognize quite a few of these iconic photographs. Their familiarity adds to the reader’s understanding that multiple viewings further one’s insight. Art teachers will obviously find this to be of great value, but so will history teachers who may want to discuss one of the historic photos to introduce a topic. Teens interested in photography will learn a great deal about subject matter and composition. In an era where we tend to jump from one image to another, the author encourages us to slow down and take another look. There is more to see than meets the eye. Reviewer: Sharon Salluzzo; Ages 12 up.
School Library Journal
08/01/2014
Gr 5–8—A brief introduction provides the framework for this slim book, which details 27 photographs under four thematic sections: portraits, nature, and documentary, and art images. Each quality, full-page reproduction sits opposite a page of information that includes a few facts (title, date, and name of the artist), along with a paragraph on the picture, noting its artistic or historical relevance, and one on the photographer discussing his/her medium, subjects, etc. Most of the featured artists are American or European. "Photo Thoughts" are presented as questions, which focus on the artist's decisions and/or the composition. They, and the "Blow Up" and "Zoom In" boxes, which point out additional details, are generally relevant but occasionally superfluous. The selections span a number of years and subjects, offering a look at how the art form developed, and about some of photography's most famous practitioners. For example, under portraits, readers will find a daguerreotype of Louis Daguerre (by Jean-Baptiste Sabatier-Blot, 1844), who produced the first eponymous permanent photograph. Nature photography highlights Eadweard Muybridge's "The Horse in Motion" (1878), which is credited as one of the precursors to high-speed photography and film. Modern images and artists are represented in work of Martin Parr, David Hockney, and Cristina Garcia Rodero. Brad Finger's 13 Photos Children Should Know (Prestel, 2011) features fewer pictures and is more subjective in tone, while each title in Capstone's superlative "Captured History" series offers an in-depth look at one image of historical significance. Consider Framed for collections needing an introduction to the topic.—Daryl Grabarek, School Library Journal
Kirkus Reviews
2014-06-25
Modern history has been defined by photographs; the most famous images are familiar to many, and each is surely worth more than a thousand words.Thomson has drawn together a collection of 27 photographic images that span the years from 1844—a self-portrait of photography inventor Louis Daguerre—to three images from 2011, including the formal portrait of Prince William and Kate Middleton's wedding party. A few other evocative photographs include Migrant Mother, by Dorothea Lange; Afghan Girl, of a solemn, green-eyed Afghani teen in a red head scarf; Marilyn Diptych, Andy Warhol's often reproduced multiple image of Marilyn Monroe; and Lunchtime atop a Skyscraper, the famous photo by Charles C. Ebbets of Depression-era construction workers fearlessly eating their lunches on a metal beam high above New York City. Missing from the collection is the tragically iconic photo called Napalm Girl; in its place is the less well-known but nonetheless moving Life Magazine image of a 3-year-old victim of the 1940 London Blitz. Each photo is accompanied by a page of text that provides the history of the image, its significance, a brief biography of the photographer and a few "Photo Thoughts"—questions to consider. The images are all intriguing and do much to capture the scope and cultural importance of photography as an art form as well as a documentary medium.A fine resource and excellent for even a casual perusal. (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763671549
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
08/05/2014
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
1,348,587
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
1090L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 Years

Meet the Author

Ruth Thomson is an award-winning author and editor of educational books on art and history, including Terezín: Voices from the Holocaust. She has an MA in museum and gallery education and lives in London.

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Photos Framed: A Fresh Look at the World's Most Memorable Photographs 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
This book is unique and refreshing. I think anyone would enjoy this book from little children to adults as it presents photographs with explanations of the photos on the opposite page and questions to consider as you stare over the picture. There are familiar pictures that I believe most everyone would know, like Buzz Aldrin’s Walk on the Moon or the Afghan Girl which was on the cover of National Geographic. There are a total of 27 photographs sectioned off into 4 categories: portrait, nature, photography and documentary. The author goes into detail about where the picture was taken and other background knowledge regarding the photographs in the book, I found this information quite informative and I learned quite a bit even about the pictures I thought I knew. The author also blows up a small piece of the photo and asks the reader a specific question about the section, just to probe you deeper into the picture. Zooming into each picture, the author makes you become aware of certain details of the photo with written facts. Glossy pages with black and white photo mingled with color photos make this a book a conversation piece. Each photo also has a quote which I loved as I love quotes when they go with amazing photos. My favorite picture was Lunchtime atop a Skyscraper from 1932. Every time I see this photo, I cringe. The photo is black and white, the men’s faces are happy and they seem on top of the world. It’s seeing these contractors sit, all crunched together, relaxing and eat their lunches on a crossbeam on the unfinished sixty-ninth floor, their legs dangling, just hanging there….I just feel all tingly inside. They look so vulnerable with the hazy landscape down below them as they smoke their cigarettes, eat their lunches and there is even one guy who has a bottle in his hand. Ahhh! I have always wondered who took this picture and now, I know. I hope the author makes more of these books, as they made me think about the photograph that were inside and appreciate them more.