BN.com Gift Guide

Physical Security for IT

( 1 )

Overview

The physical security of IT, network, and telecommunications assets is equally as important as cyber security. We justifiably fear the hacker, the virus writer and the cyber terrorist. But the disgruntled employee, the thief, the vandal, the corporate foe, and yes, the terrorist can easily cripple an organization by doing physical damage to IT assets. In many cases such damage can be far more difficult to recover from than a hack attack or malicious code incident. It does little good to have great computer ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $21.88   
  • New (5) from $48.45   
  • Used (2) from $21.88   
Sending request ...

Overview

The physical security of IT, network, and telecommunications assets is equally as important as cyber security. We justifiably fear the hacker, the virus writer and the cyber terrorist. But the disgruntled employee, the thief, the vandal, the corporate foe, and yes, the terrorist can easily cripple an organization by doing physical damage to IT assets. In many cases such damage can be far more difficult to recover from than a hack attack or malicious code incident. It does little good to have great computer security if wiring closets are easily accessible or individuals can readily walk into an office and sit down at a computer and gain access to systems and applications.

Even though the skill level required to hack systems and write viruses is becoming widespread, the skill required to wield an ax, hammer, or fire hose and do thousands of dollars in damage is even more common. Although many books cover computer security from one perspective or another, they do not thoroughly address physical security. This book shows organizations how to design and implement physical security plans. It provides practical, easy-to-understand and readily usable advice to help organizations to improve physical security for IT, network, and telecommunications assets.

• Expert advice on identifying physical security needs
• Guidance on how to design and implement security plans to prevent the physical destruction of, or tampering with computers, network equipment, and telecommunications systems
• Explanation of the processes for establishing a physical IT security function
• Step-by-step instructions on how to accomplish physical security objectives
• Illustrations of the major elements of a physical IT security plan
• Specific guidance on how to develop and document physical security methods and procedures

The physical security of IT, network, and telecommunications assets is equally as important as cyber security. We justifiably fear the hacker, the virus writer and the cyber terrorist. But the disgruntled employee, the thief, the vandal, the corporate foe, and yes, the terrorist can easily cripple an organization by doing physical damage to IT assets. In many cases such damage can be far more difficult to recover from than a hack attack or malicious code incident. It does little good to have great computer security if wiring closets are easily accessible or individuals can readily walk into an office and sit down at a computer and gain access to systems and applications.

Even though the skill level required to hack systems and write viruses is becoming widespread, the skill required to wield an ax, hammer, or fire hose and do thousands of dollars in damage is even more common. Although many books cover computer security from one perspective or another, they do not thoroughly address physical security. This book shows organizations how to design and implement physical security plans. It provides practical, easy-to-understand and readily usable advice to help organizations to improve physical security for IT, network, and telecommunications assets. Expert advice on identifying physical security needs

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Michael has unquestionable knowledge about how organizations today are linking their systems across enterprise-wide networks and virtual private networks (VPNs), as well as increasing their exposure to customers, competitors, browsers, hackers, and physical threats to the facility equipment and network(s). This book will show you how each connection magnifies the vulnerability to attack. This book also provides the fundamental knowledge you need to analyze electronic and physical risks to your networks and systems." —John Vacca, Author of numerous computer security books
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781555583279
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 11/22/2004
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 0.53 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 9.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Erbschloe an information technology consultant, educator, and author. Michael has also taught and developed technology related curriculum for several universities including the University of Denver, and speaks at conferences and industry events around the world. He has authored hundreds of articles on technology and several books including Information Warfare: How to Survive Cyber Attacks.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

The physical security of IT, network, and telecommunications assets is equally as important as cyber security. We justifiably fear the hacker, the virus writer and the cyber terrorist. But the disgruntled employee, the thief, the vandal, the corporate foe, and yes, the terrorist can easily cripple an organization by doing physical damage to IT assets. In many cases such damage can be far more difficult to recover from than a hack attack or malicious code incident. It does little good to have great computer security if wiring closets are easily accessible or individuals can readily walk into an office and sit down at a computer and gain access to systems and applications.

Even though the skill level required to hack systems and write viruses is becoming widespread, the skill required to wield an ax, hammer, or fire hose and do thousands of dollars in damage is even more common. Although many books cover computer security from one perspective or another, they do not thoroughly address physical security. This book shows organizations how to design and implement physical security plans. It provides practical, easy-to-understand and readily usable advice to help organizations to improve physical security for IT, network, and telecommunications assets.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2005

    PUTTING THE 'PHYSICAL' BACK INTO PHYSICAL SECURITY

    The obsession about cyber security has far too often overshadowed the need for improving physical security of IT. Author Michael Erbschloe has done an outstanding job in this book of showing organizations how to design and implement security plans to prevent the physical destruction of, or tampering with computers, network equipment, and telecommunications systems. Erbschloe begins this book by providing an overview of physical security and the many reasons it is so important. Next, the author covers the process of establishing a physical IT security function in an organization. In addition, the author presents the steps to developing a physical security plan. He also explains the major elements of a physical security plan, including the overview and mission statement, assignment of organizational responsibilities, the use of duty officers, and the management of contact lists. Then, he provides a detailed discussion on how to develop and document methods and procedures for the planning areas. The author then covers the importance of testing and how to test and audit procedures. Next, he covers the steps for managing response to an incident. Then, he presents a model training program for physical IT security. Finally, he takes a look at the future of physical security for IT assets. With the preceding in mind, the author has done an excellent job of providing the reader with a practical, easy to understand and readily usable advice to help his or her organization improve physical security for IT, network and telecom assets. At the end of the day, you, the reader, will have a clear understanding that the struggle to improve physical security will continue well into the future.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)