The Physics of Quantum Information: Quantum Cryptography, Quantum Teleportation, Quantum Computation / Edition 1

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Overview

Leading experts from "The Physics of Quantum Information" network, an initiative of the European Commission, bring together the most recent results of the emerging area of quantum technology. Written in a consistent style as a research monograph, the book introduces into quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation, and quantum computation, considering both theory and newest experiments. Thus scientists working in the field and advanced students will find a rich source of information on this exciting new area.

Introduces quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation, and quantum computation, considering both theory and the latest experiments.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

From the reviews

"Included among the more than 40 contributors are some of the subject¿s leading European practitioners¿ Topics are well balanced between presentations of the theory (dazzling in its ingenuity) and crude attempts at implementation (tours de force in technol9gy, but still a long way from non-trivial computational application)¿ ¿The Physics of Quantum Information¿ does convey a through and authoritative picture of the state of this fascinating futuristic art as we enter the 21st century."

- American Scientist

"This volume covers Quantum Cryptography Quantum Teleportation and Quantum Computation. The book presents clearly the fundamental concepts, amply illustrated with theoretical calculations and descriptions of experimental work. Consequently, this is a first-class primer, pitched at a level suitable for honours students or above.
The first section, dealing with Quantum Cryptography, discusses the possibility of secure exchange of key material via entangled states in quantum channels. The presentation makes it clear that quantum key exchange, using quantum indeterminacy to test for an eavesdropper, offers genuine security. The discussion of experimental realisations suggests that this will be a practical technology in the not too distant future.
The next chapter is on Quantum "teleportation", the transfer of a quantum state to an entangled system at another location. This chapter includes a discussion of a number of elegant experiments.
Much of the book is devoted to Quantum Computing. An introduction introduces the qubit (quantum bit) and quantum logic gates, followed by a very clear exposition of quantum algorithms, and their speed advantages over classical algorithms. The presentation then moves to the practicalities of building a quantum computer. Decoherence, a formidable challenge, is covered at length. There is a tendency in some writings to understate the difficulties that decoherence might present, but here the discussion is clear and balanced. The authors then move to potential solutions; quantum error correction and entanglement purification. Finally, this book has a very good index and an extensive bibliography. Unreservedly recommended, and deserving of a place in any Physics library."

Andrew Davies
Department of Defence
Canberra ACT

The Physicist, Australian Institute of Physics, 2001,38,1
"The best of these (multi-author works) so far is The Physics of Quantum Information edited by Dik Bouwmeester, Artur Ekert and Anton Zeilinger and published by Springer-Verlag. It is too much to expect that a multi-author book would present a coherent vision of a subject as young as this. The editors however have done an excellent job of stitching together a rewarding tapestry of the field as it stands today. (...) The Physics of Quantum Information is essential reading for anyone new to the field, particularly if they enter from the direction of quantum optics and atomic physics." Gerard J. Milburn, Australia; Quantum Information and Computation 1, 89-90 (2001)

"The editors however have done an excellent job of stitching together a rewarding tapestry of the field as it stands today…The Physics of Quantum Information is essential reading for anyone new to the field, particularly if they enter from the direction of quantum optics and atomic physics."
–The Physicist

"Unreservedly recommended, and deserving of a place in any Physics library."
–Andrew Davies, Department of Defence, Canberra, Australia

AMERICAN SCIENTIST
"Topics are well balanced between presentations of the theory (dazzling in its ingenuity) and crude attempts at its implementation (tours de force of technology, but still a long way from any nontrivial computational application)…does convey a thorough and authoritative picture of the state of this fascinating futuristic art as we enter the 21st century.”

QUANTUM INFORMATION & COMPUTATION
"…an excellent job of stitching together a rewarding tapestry of the field as it stands today…essential reading for anyone new to the field, particularly if they enter from the direction of quantum optics and atomic physics.”

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783642086076
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 12/10/2010
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 315
  • Sales rank: 1,003,464
  • Product dimensions: 0.69 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 6.14 (d)

Table of Contents

Basic Concepts in Quantum Information Physics.
1: Quantum Cryptography.
2: Quantum Dense Coding and Quantum Teleportation.
3: Concepts of Quantum Computation.
4: Experiments Towards Quantum Computation.
5: Quantum Networks and Many-Particle Entanglement.
6: Decoherence and Quantum Error Correction.
7: Entanglement Purification.
References.
Index.
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2003

    To learn it.

    You could use this book as a first if you have a general idea of basic concepts in quantum theory. It is a collection of very nicely written tutorials. They are done by authorities in the field, and cover the main trends. I especially liked Jozsa's chapter on quantum algorithms. By now there are also good textbooks that can get you started from scratch, such as Hirvensalo, or Nielsen-Chuang. If you have trouble getting hold the original journal articles, World Scientific just came out with a collection of major papers on quantum computation and quantum information, isbn 9810241178. It includes the full text [reprinted] of some of the papers which are cited in the present book; quite a few by the very same authors. That is a big help, as the papers in the subject are scattered and spread out over many different journals, and it might be hard to know where to start when logging into the arXiv.

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