A Picture for Marc

A Picture for Marc

2.6 3
by Eric A. Kimmel, Matthew Trueman
     
 

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GROWING UP IN Russia in the late 1800s, Marc Chagall doesn't know what art is. He doesn't even know what drawing is until one of his schoolmates shows him how to trace a picture in a magazine. Marc tries it himself, then decides to pull pictures out of his own mind - his Uncle Noah on the roof, giant chickens, flying cows, happy men with fiddles, and women

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Overview

GROWING UP IN Russia in the late 1800s, Marc Chagall doesn't know what art is. He doesn't even know what drawing is until one of his schoolmates shows him how to trace a picture in a magazine. Marc tries it himself, then decides to pull pictures out of his own mind - his Uncle Noah on the roof, giant chickens, flying cows, happy men with fiddles, and women with lambs. Suddenly Marc knows what he wants to do with his life. He wants to be an artist!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Based in factual information about Marc Chagall's childhood, this simple chapter book presents a plausible scenario of Chagall's discovery of his artistic talent at a young age. Growing up in a small town in Russia in the late 1800s was not conducive to an interest in art. Marc noticed beauty everywhere. He delighted in the everyday scenes he observed: a chestnut horse pulling a wagon, a gray-bearded fiddler playing his violin, the changing shapes of clouds. Others did not share his joy of color and movement. Then, one day, a classmate showed him how to trace a picture from a magazine. Marc soon tired of tracing and discovered that he could draw his own pictures. The classmate introduced Marc to Yehuda Pen, a local artist who gave training and encouragement to young people with talent. Marc's dad took him to work on the docks with him so he could learn about how the world really was. While he kept a ledger of barrels loaded and unloaded, Marc drew pictures in the margins of the pages. The owner of the factory was so impressed with Marc's drawings that his dad agreed to let Marc study with Mr. Pen, and his career was launched. Simple black-line illustrations capture the tone and convey the enthusiasm of the story. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

Gr 2-5
To most people, Vitebsk in the late 1800s is one of the dullest towns in Russia, but Marc Chagall's ability to see the enchantment in all things makes even the mundane seem exciting to him. Kimmel paints a fascinating picture of the artist's young years, including details about his struggles in school and within his family. A classmate helps to open the door to his dreams and his parents move from not supporting his desire to helping him explore his deep interest in art. The story moves along at a good pace as much of it is told through dialogue. The author skillfully weaves actual events into the narrative. The black-and-white illustrations contain vivid details and add depth to the story. An author's note and a list of books about Chagall are appended, a helpful inclusion to this work of fiction. It's an engaging beginning chapter book that promotes art and the importance of holding on to one's dreams.
—Michelle EasleyCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
For a young Jewish boy growing up in Tsarist Russia, wanting to become an artist is not likely to meet with enthusiastic parental support. In this case, the boy is the young Marc Chagall, an aspiring artist with a gift for seeing beauty in the ordinary. He observes, "We all need art to show us what is truly beautiful and important in the world . . . We need art to show us how to live, how to be alive in the world." Marc's parents obviously relent and allow their son to study art, and the rest is history. For this fictionalized account, Kimmel takes only the bare bones of Chagall's story-the Russian village, the influential art teacher, the worried parents-to get across what is truly important: to follow your dream. Simple black-and-white drawings have a childlike quality as if done by the young Chagall. (author's note, bibliography) (Fiction. 6-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375832536
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
09/25/2007
Series:
Stepping Stone Books Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.81(w) x 8.56(h) x 0.55(d)
Lexile:
510L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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