Picture This...

Picture This...

by Alison Jay
     
 

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Simple in format, with vibrant folk-art inspired paintings of everyday items and a single, large-type word on each page, Picture This . . . is the ideal first word book for the very young. But there is much more to Picture This . . . than first meets the eye! Each turn of the page reveals a new perspective on what has come before and gives a hint of what's to come.

Overview

Simple in format, with vibrant folk-art inspired paintings of everyday items and a single, large-type word on each page, Picture This . . . is the ideal first word book for the very young. But there is much more to Picture This . . . than first meets the eye! Each turn of the page reveals a new perspective on what has come before and gives a hint of what's to come. Parents will delight in reading this book with their children, finding visual surprises together and following the gentle story as it progresses through the day and through the seasons.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Nostalgic images of a country landscape disguise this picture book's visual complexity. At first glance, nothing seems out of the ordinary. British author/artist Jay provides a set of gorgeous illustrations in the American primitive style, each labeled with a quaint word such as "tortoise" or "umbrella." However, the author has more than a spelling lesson in mind. The sequence begins with the lowercase word "clock" and a picture of the face of a grandfather clock, a pairing that looks easy until "Hickory Dickory Dock" enthusiasts notice the hour (almost one o'clock) and the gray mouse atop the timepiece. Decorative images surround the clock face, alluding to the four seasons and to forthcoming pictures of, for instance, a "snail" and "cat." Later in the volume, a yellow tabby refers back to the opening image of the cat pictured on the clock and also directs readers' attention to new objects, including a fire engine-red "airplane" loop-de-looping in the summer sky. Meanwhile, other visual allusions (to Jack and Jill, for example, and the Tortoise and the Hare) draw on nursery lore. The concluding winter scene, captioned simply "snowman," again recalls the clock and reactivates the book's cycle. Jay sets all the scenes in a seaside orchard among rolling hills; her luxurious palette includes custard colors--avocado green, robin's egg blue, vanilla white and peachy gold--and the paintings have the crackled surface of antique porcelain. Fans of such brainteasers as David Wiesner's Tuesday and Joan Steiner's Look-Alikes will be charmed by this pictorial puzzler. Ages 2-5. (May) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Each page or double-page illustration is accompanied by a single word referring to the picture. At first this seems like a simple identification. But much more emerges as we move from page to page. For each picture relates to the one before. And time and seasons also progress as forecasted by the clock's painted face at the start and on the back of the jacket/cover. The subtly simple style of the paintings suggests some recent past, reinforced by the surface crackling. One must look closely to locate the image that will be the focus of the next painting and must also note which other images are carried forward as well. For the very young, this can be used to connect a noun with an attractive visual representation. But the fun begins when the reader attends to the other pieces, to make connections that illuminate some of the mystery that seems to permeate the pages. 2000 (orig. 1999), Dutton Children's Books, Ages 3 to 8, $15.99. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz—Children's Literature
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-With just one word per page, Jay takes readers on a journey through the seasons, beginning with images that decorate a clock on the very first page. Children studying the primitive-style, crackle-glazed paintings will delight in finding the nursery-rhyme look-alikes and other familiar objects. Tiny images on one page become full-sized illustrations on the next. The little snail on a golden leaf in autumn next appears larger than life, sporting an alarmed expression as a menacing red boot-worn by the girl raking leaves in the previous picture-approaches. Viewers' eyes are at once drawn across each page and yet are invited to tarry, studying each scene to find all that is hidden within. One may wonder if the couple running up the sunny hill to fetch a pail of water is the same pair pictured ice skating in a painting on the wall in a Yuletide scene. This unique book is clever enough to engage older children, yet simple enough to be a first wordbook for the youngest readers.-Doris Gebel, Northport-East Northport Public Library, NY Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Glenn Michael Gordon
Little learners can build big vocabularies with this eye-catching wordbook featuring folk art-inspired illustrations.
Child Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525468288
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Edition description:
BOARD
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 8.18(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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