Picture This: World War I Posters and Visual Culture

Overview


The First World War was waged through the participation not just of soldiers but of men, women, and children on the home front. Mass-produced, full-color, large-format war posters were both a sign and an instrument of this historic shift in warfare. War posters celebrated, in both their form and content, the modernity of the conflict. They also reached an enormous international audience through their prominent display and continual reproduction in pamphlets and magazines in every combatant nation, uniting ...
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Picture This: World War I Posters and Visual Culture

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Overview


The First World War was waged through the participation not just of soldiers but of men, women, and children on the home front. Mass-produced, full-color, large-format war posters were both a sign and an instrument of this historic shift in warfare. War posters celebrated, in both their form and content, the modernity of the conflict. They also reached an enormous international audience through their prominent display and continual reproduction in pamphlets and magazines in every combatant nation, uniting diverse populations as viewers of the same image and bringing them closer, in an imaginary and powerful way, to the war.
 
Most war posters were aimed particularly at civilian populations. Posters nationalized, mobilized, and modernized those populations, thereby influencing how they viewed themselves and their activities. The home-front life—factory work, agricultural work, domestic work, the consumption and conservation of goods, as well as various forms of leisure—became, through the viewing of posters, emblematic of national identity and of each citizen’s place within the collective effort to win the war.
 

Essays by Jay Winter, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Jennifer D. Keene, and others reveal the centrality of visual media, particularly the poster, within the specific national contexts of Britain, France, Germany, Russia, and the United States during World War I. Ultimately, posters were not merely representations of popular understanding of the war, but instruments influencing the reach, meaning, and memory of the war in subtle and pervasive ways.

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Editorial Reviews

CHOICE

"This is a fine addition to the growing body of literature on this somewhat ephemeral form of graphic communication."—S. Skaggs, CHOICE

— S. Skaggs

Annals of Iowa

"Readers’ comprehension of World War I posters will be enriched well beyond their most thorough visual observations."—Barbara Steinson, Annals of Iowa

— Barbara Steinson

Journal of American History

"Historians of war, politics, gender, culture, art, and literature will all benefit from the insights presented here."—David Welky, Journal of American History

— David Welky

Journal of Military History

"Picture This is a powerful edited collection in which the whole adds up to a great deal more than the sum of its parts."—Karen Petrone, Journal of Military History

— Karen Petrone

CHOICE - S. Skaggs

"This is a fine addition to the growing body of literature on this somewhat ephemeral form of graphic communication."—S. Skaggs, CHOICE
Journal of American History - David Welky

"Historians of war, politics, gender, culture, art, and literature will all benefit from the insights presented here."—David Welky, Journal of American History
Annals of Iowa - Barbara Steinson

"Readers' comprehension of World War I posters will be enriched well beyond their most thorough visual observations."—Barbara Steinson, Annals of Iowa
Journal of Military History - Karen Petrone

"Picture This is a powerful edited collection in which the whole adds up to a great deal more than the sum of its parts."—Karen Petrone, Journal of Military History
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803226104
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/2010
  • Series: Studies in War, Society, and the Military Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 632,618
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author


Pearl James is an assistant professor of English at the University of Kentucky. 
 
Contributors: Meg Albrinck, Richard S. Fogarty, Stefan Goebel, Nicoletta F. Gullace, Pearl James, Jakub Kazecki, Jennifer D. Keene, John M. Kinder, Mark Levitch, Jason Lieblang, Andrew Nedd, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, and Jay Winter.
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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vii

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction: Reading World War I Posters Pearl James 1

1 Imaginings of War: Posters and the Shadow of the Lost Generation Jay winter 37

Part 1 War Poster Campaigns and Images, Comparative Readings

2 Barbaric Anti-Modernism: Representations of the "Hun" in Britain, North America, Australia, and Beyond Nicoletta F. Gullace 61

3 Chivalrous Knights versus Iron Warriors: Representations of the Battle of Materiel and Slaughter in Britain and Germany, I914-194O Stefan Goebel 79

4 Regression versus Progression: Fundamental Differences in German and American Posters of the First World War Jakub kazecki Jason Lieblang 111

Part 2 Envisioning the Nation and Imagining National Aesthetics

5 Young Blood: Parisian Schoolgirls' Transformation of France's Great War Poster Aesthetic Mark Levitch 145

6 Race and Empire in French Posters of the Great War Richard S. Fogarty 172

7 Images of Racial Pride: African American Propaganda Posters in the First World War Jennifer D. Keene 207

8 Segodniashnii Lubok: Art, War, and National Identity Rew M. Nedd 241

Part 3 Figuring the Body in the Context of War

9 Images of Femininity in American World War I Posters Pearl James 273

10 Humanitarians and He-Men: Recruitment Posters and die Masculine Ideal MEG Albrinck 312

11 Iconography of Injury: Encountering the Wounded Soldier's Body in American Poster Art and Photography of World War I John M. Kinder 340

Epilogue Jefrey T. Schanpp 369

Selected Bibliography 377

Contributors 383

Index 387

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