Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are

Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are

3.9 25
by Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald
     
 

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Who are we?

What’s going on inside us when we think, feel, hope, or imagine?

Can we change?

Can we become happier, smarter, healthier, more altruistic

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Overview

This is the eBook version of the printed book. If the print book includes a CD-ROM, this content is not included within the eBook version.

 

Who are we?

What’s going on inside us when we think, feel, hope, or imagine?

Can we change?

Can we become happier, smarter, healthier, more altruistic–better?

 

For thousands of years, people have wondered about questions like these. Now, using the latest brain scanning technologies, neuroscientists can watch your brain at work–and they’re amazed by what they’re seeing. Now, you can see it, too. Pictures of the Mind presents the images that are revolutionizing neuroscience and offers you a personal tour of the frontiers of brain research.

 

You’ll discover why scientists are becoming increasingly excited about your brain’s abilities to keep growing, learning, changing, and healing, all through life. You’ll follow cutting-edge researchers as they blaze new trails toward potential cures for everything from depression to dementia and brain injury to addiction. And you’ll preview what could become the greatest scientific revolution of all: the one that finally explains mind, emotion, and consciousness.

 

 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780137054480
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
01/08/2010
Series:
FT Press Science
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
841,932
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

For 15 years, Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald has published on a wide range of scientific topics geared to curious readers of all backgrounds. She believes in taking the boring out of “technical” so that we might all have ready access to knowledge that can help us lead happier, healthier, more fulfilling lives.

With a degree in physics from Swarthmore College, Ms. Boleyn-Fitzgerald is a former recipient of the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship and the Ida M. Green Award for graduate studies in Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has worked as a staff writer for President Clinton’s Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments and as an analyst for the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Union of Concerned Scientists. Ms. Boleyn-Fitzgerald lives and writes in Appleton, Wisconsin, with her husband Patrick and their son Aidan.

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Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are 3.9 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 25 reviews.
YoyoMitch More than 1 year ago
Learning how the brain works is fascinating. The possibility that humans can study the organ that, as is presently understood, makes possible the “study” itself is enough to boggle the “mind,” which is supposedly held in the brain. To glimpse a picture of the process of “the mind” holds the promise of mystery and wonder – how can one “see” what is immaterial (thoughts)? Because of technologies like functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans, scientists can now “glimpse” what the brain looks like when the “mind” is in action. This book is not very long in pages, but is dense in content. The science discussed, hypotheses posed and the stunning progress being made toward an understanding of how the brain actually works holds those interested in such material as spellbound as a well-crafted novel. Those not as interested in such disciplines will not find this tome as intriguing, but will find the information they reap from reading it worth the time investment. There are literally pictures of the brain, taken by fMRI and three -dimensional PET scans, in “motion” (taken as the subject is given various tasks) contained in this book. It is from these scans and images that the understanding of how the brain actually works is being deepened and theories around how to retrain the brain after it has been harmed by almost any injury. To date, the only injuries not shown to be responsive to the treatments thus far developed have been those suffered from oxygen deprivation. The progress brought by the treatments and knowledge gained have given hope to those once thought to be injured beyond repair. It has been shown, in these scans that some individuals who would have once been considered as being in a “sustained vegetative state” (well defined in medicine and clearly explained within the book) are actually aware of their surroundings and are now being treated toward recovery rather than “sustaining.” This, were it the only benefit from this research, would be worth all the effort. The book ends with suggestions of how the reader can use the information gleaned from the research. The majority of the book is written using a lot of medical nomenclature but the “how to” section ending the book is written in with a “non-professional” reader in mind. Much of what is suggested is found in other literature dealing with the same subject (My Stroke of Insight, Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, The Brain That Changes Itself). Exercises such as: mindfulness, breathing, meditation, eating well, the benefits of exercise, challenging one’s self regularly, develop an attitude of thankfulness and meaningful, healthy relationships all have shown to add to mental clarity, protect against dementia (including Alzheimer’s Disease) and keep the us “young” regardless of age. All of these exercises can be done easily, with minimal effort and can offer tremendous profits to one’s well-being.
Lucy-from-PA More than 1 year ago
This wasn't quite what I was expecting and I found it not only very interesting but very informative. One I will read again.
stepup07 More than 1 year ago
This a great book I would recommend this book for anyone and any age.
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****
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seems to be repeating itself over and over.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool picts
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is under free books this is not free ther for they need o ake this offfffff
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why would someone write a review, giving one star rating, and simply state that s/he hasn't read it yet? I haven't read it yet, either, but I'll give five stars to counter the one star.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
none
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not bangin