Pie Magic

Pie Magic

by Toby Forward, Laura Cornell
     
 

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Bertie George is the fattest boy in school-and the loneliest. But he loves his job as delivery boy for the oldest and smallest and best pie shop in the world. A mysterious customer gives Bertie a magical formula for losing weight, but can the answer to Bertie's problems really be as easy as pie?

Overview

Bertie George is the fattest boy in school-and the loneliest. But he loves his job as delivery boy for the oldest and smallest and best pie shop in the world. A mysterious customer gives Bertie a magical formula for losing weight, but can the answer to Bertie's problems really be as easy as pie?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Susan Fournier
Poor Bertie George! Not only is he the fattest boy in school, he is also the loneliest. Constant teasing and mocking from his classmates make school almost unbearable. To Bertie, the only positive aspect of his life is his job at the bakery, delivering pies. But things change for Bertie when he delivers a pie to an odd but interesting stranger. Mr. Gupta has a remedy to cure whatever your ailment may be. Can he really solve Bertie's weight problem with magic? Follow Bertie as he learns to change his eating habits while changing his attitude toward people, and especially himself. The snappy dialogue and the author's sense of humor will endear readers to Bertie's plight without preaching the obvious lesson.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688145118
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/29/1996
Edition description:
1st U.S. ed
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.74(w) x 8.55(h) x 0.61(d)
Age Range:
8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Bertie George Pedaled Along, whistling. His chin wobbled as his old black bike bumped on the cobbled street, but he was happy. Bertie was the best whistler in his school. He could do birdcalls, huge shrieking salutes, tunes-he only needed to hear a tune once and he could do it perfectly, and he could even do the sound of a telephone. It was so good that you couldn't tell the difference. Once, when Bertie was in trouble for fighting at school, Mr. Formalyn, the principal, was trying to scold him, and the phone kept on interrupting. But every time that Mr. Formalyn picked it up, there was no one there.

"So, Bertie," said Mr. Formalyn, wagging a knobby finger at him, "let me tell you, my lad, that—-"

Brrr. Brrrr. Brrr Brrrr.

Mr. Formalyn frowned. This was the third time."Yes, hello," he said, snatching the phone. Nothing. He slammed it down."Now. Where was I? "Let me tell you, my lad," said Bertie, helpfully."Yes. Well . Brrr Brrrr Mr. Formalyn leapt forward and grabbed it quickly."Yes!"Nothing."This is the last time!" he yelled into the silent phone. "The very last time."Slam."And if I ever catch you in a fight again, Bertie George, I'll—-"Brrr BrrrrThe phone was in Mr. Formalyn's hand before Bettie saw him move."Now you listen to me!" shouted the principal. "If you've got nothing better to do than waste my time with stupid phone calls you should be locked up, you fool. Don't you know I'm a busy man?"There was a small cough from the other end."Mr. Formalyn?"

"Yes! Of course it is." Mr. Formalyn's moustache jumped up and down when he shouted. "What do you think you're doing?"

"I'm really very sorry to interruptyou. . .

"Reverend?" said Mr. Formalyn, recognizing the voice.

"Er, yes. Is it an inconvenient time?"

Mr. Formalyn blushed. "Oh, er, no. I'm ...That is, I'm so sorry I . . . I don't suppose you called before?"

"No, this is my first try," said the reverend.

"Well, you see," said Mr. Formalyn, and he gave a little laugh to try to apologize. "That is, my phone . .

He waved Bertie away and pointed to the door. Bertie closed the door behind him. Waited. Heard the principal go on apologizing. Then he blew gently between his teeth, curling up his tongue.

Brrr. Brrrr.

Mr. Formalyn jumped, looked closely at the phone, frowned, and went on apologizing.

And he forgot all about Bertie and his fight. For that time.

But there were other fights. Lots of them. And Bertie started them all. And Bertie lost them all. But he kept on starting them.

Because Bertie was fat. Very fat. Bertie was the fattest boy they had ever seen at his school.

So, of course, nobody really liked him.

And they called him names. They called him Fatty, of course. And Piggy. And Wobbles. And Fatman. And Pigface. And Porker. Bertie hated all the names. But he especially hated Porker. His grandma—-Bertie lived with his grandma—-told him to ignore the names. And he was quite good at that. But he hated Porker so much that he couldn't ignore it. So he got into fights.

So Bertie was glad it was today. Because today was the first day of spring break and there was a whole week without school. A whole week without anyone to call him names. A whole week without a fight. He was so happy that he nearly didn't bother to eat a chocolate egg with a creamy filling as he rode along.

Nearly.

Mmmm. He licked a sticky lip, turned a sharp corner, and plunged down a narrow lane. Bertie gripped the handlebars of the old black bike and wobbled happily along the cobbles to Pie Craft, the oldest and smallest and best pie shop in the whole world.

"Hey! Here's Pigface!"

"Oink!!"

"Oink!"

"Grunt!"

"Porker!"

Bettie pointed his bike at a group of children from his school, pounded his feet down on the pedals, and charged at them.

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