Pigsong

Pigsong

5.0 2
by Frank Delaney
     
 
"Once upon a time and long ago, when snow tasted like cream, and timber tasted like sweet cake, and every tenth egg laid by a duck had a diamond in it, there lived up in the North of Ireland a very bad man."

The third short story in Frank Delaney's series, "Storytellers," is far more than charming as he instructs, seduces, entertains and allows us to see how

Overview

"Once upon a time and long ago, when snow tasted like cream, and timber tasted like sweet cake, and every tenth egg laid by a duck had a diamond in it, there lived up in the North of Ireland a very bad man."

The third short story in Frank Delaney's series, "Storytellers," is far more than charming as he instructs, seduces, entertains and allows us to see how an oppressed culture might have learned the concept of justice through imagination.

Editorial Reviews

David Goodwin
This is the third of Frank Delaney's Storyteller series - original short stories in which he tries to capture in print the grand tradition of oral storytelling, Irish and otherwise. Tries, and succeeds.

Pigsong is a delight - it's magical and funny, but at its heart it's a powerful story of faith and compassion, and of their role in history. It's a story of slavery and cruelty, and of freedom; as the title suggest, it's a pig that leads the way.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014225441
Publisher:
MEIER
Publication date:
04/05/2012
Series:
Frank Delaney Storyteller , #3
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
248,844
File size:
444 KB

Meet the Author

'The Most Eloquent Man in the World', says NPR, about the writer, broadcaster, BBC host and Booker Prize Judge, Frank Delaney. Over a career of interviews that has lasted more than three decades, Delaney, an international-best-selling author himself, has interviewed more than 3,500 of the world's most important writers.

Frank Delaney has earned top prizes and best-seller status in a wide variety of formats, from prolific author, a polished broadcaster on both television and radio, to journalist, correspondent, screenwriter, lecturer, playwright and scholar. He has been the president of the Samuel Johnson Society, president of the UK Book Trust, and the Literary Director of the famed Edinburgh Festival.

A judge of many literary prizes (including the famous Booker), Delaney also created landmark programs and passionate documentaries on many subjects including Joyce, Shaw, Oscar Wilde, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Hemingway, Mailer, Matisse, Van Gogh and the vitality and organic growth of the English language - his famed BBC show on the way we speak, Word of Mouth, is still heard all over the English-speaking world. And his six-part series, The Celts, originally broadcast in forty countries, is still in active DVD distribution, some twenty years after its launch.

Mr. Delaney lectures all over the world, writes every day, and has created a significant podcast series: Re:Joyce, deconstructing, examining and illuminating James Joyce's Ulysses line-by-line, in accessible and entertaining five-minute broadcasts, posted each week on this website. The project is estimated to run a quarter of a century.

Born and raised in County Tipperary, Ireland, Delaney spent more than twenty-five years in England before moving to the United States in 2002. His first 'American' book was the New York Times Bestseller, Ireland. His second, the non-fiction Simple Courage, was chosen as one of the top five books of the year by the American Library Association. Since 2006, he has published five Novels of Ireland, all addressing, decade by decade, the twentieth century history of his homeland. His latest novel, "The Last Storyteller" (Random House, February 7th 2012) celebrates the mysteries of the ancient oral tradition as the last itinerant storytellers work their magic in 1950's Ireland.

Mr. Delaney lives in Litchfield County, Connecticut, with his wife, writer and marketer, Diane Meier.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New York, New York, and Kent, Connecticut
Date of Birth:
October 24, 1941
Place of Birth:
Tipperary, Republic of Ireland
Education:
Thomastown National School 1947-54; The Abbey School, Tipperary, 1954-60; Rosse College, Dublin, 1960
Website:
http://www.frankdelaney.com

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Pigsong 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
literarymuseVC More than 1 year ago
Frank Delaney continues his Storyteller short story series with this tale that contains all of the elements of great storytelling that the author describes: "surprise...magic...notable, place-holding phrases...digression..homespun wisdom...hint of morality...and the suspension of belief and disbelief at one and the same time." Yes, it's all here in this very brief short story and what a story it is! Yes, "once upon a time..." there was a very greedy and hard-hearted couple who wanted to get rich but knew they couldn't do it alone. So they devise a scheme to obtain (something like that, ahem) the necessary help and create a horrific world for far too many people. So far, nothing we haven't met in other tales, right? But now is where the magic begins! A young boy set to the task of taking care of pigs learns to truly listen to the song that will free him and make him a new man capable of so much more than one's limited imagination alone can dream! No, no more here - you simply must read this wonderful story, written in impeccable and eloquent language, to fully appreciate the gift within it which will let your own heart listen and soar to new heights! Frank Delaney has done it again - what a gem - a must read written by a true Bard!
TheComingoftheToads More than 1 year ago
When I hear there’s a pig story in the offing, I think immediately of two of my favorite writers, P. G. Wodehouse, whose Lord Emsworth kept pigs, and E. B. White, whose Wilbur, of “Charlotte’s Web” fame, I can’t help but think of whenever I sit down to what another Wodehouse character, Bertie, of “Jeeves and the Bacon Fat Caper” fame, called the B and E, sometimes E and B, freely improvising on the jazz theme, but for our purposes here, sausage and eggs. And yet, these singing pigs are not here sizzling in the pan, but if a pig really can sing, what has that to say about language? Perhaps many living and non-living things can talk, and we can hear them, animals and plants, acoustic and electric things, if only we try to listen. What is talk? What is language? So it was with a bit of trepidation, resulting in only a tiny pig’s tail of technological frustration, that I delved into a bit of e-Pig fat and tasted a short story last night via Amazon’s Kindle Cloud Reader: tu-whit, “Pigsong,” by Frank Delaney. There might be three kinds of people in our human world: masters, slaves, and those who escape entrapment of either of those two. But when we include animals, plants, rocks, and other things from our compost pile to the table of words, more interesting plots develop, and foil characters want out of their foils. I have come to love compost. I love the sweet and awful smell of rotting food, decaying plants, moist loam and dirty, muddy soil, and I love to turn the compost pile over to discover mounds of lovely redish-purple worms at warm work eating their way through their Garden of Eden. Get a little closer and you can hear, hear the hum of the compost heap. I must have a bit of the pig in me. I think I can hear the pigs singing. Frank Delaney, prolific Irish author, surely must lust for words as a pig honkers down to a late summer corn husk, must have some sort of language compost heap at his disposal. What do pigs have in common with Ireland’s Saint Patrick? Well, for the answer to that, you’ll have to read the story: “Pigsong,” by Frank Delaney. Pigs are singing, waiting for listeners. It’s a story in which animals become human beings and tells of the origins of power, justice, and faith, and of independence, of cruelty and revolution to overthrow that cruelty. All this in a short story? Yes, well, it’s a fable, and so covers a lot of ground in a short space. The source of stories that in turn explains the source of stories is a very old story, and continues to grow out of the compost heap made of words and fears and triumphs of songs and hate and love of cruel masters and creative workers in language that has been turned over and over by many a storyteller over the years. Frank Delaney is one of the best. Review by Joe Linker first published at The Coming of the Toads on 4-25-2012