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The Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come (1918)

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THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS, IN THE SIMILITUD,E OF A DREAM. w' The Jail. I walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a Den, and I laid me down in that place to sleep : and, as I slept, ...
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The Pilgrim's Progress: From This World to That Which Is to Come.

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS, IN THE SIMILITUD,E OF A DREAM. w' The Jail. I walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a Den, and I laid me down in that place to sleep : and, as I slept, Ijlreanied a dream. I dreamed, and behold I saw a man clothed with rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and agreat burden' ii pr.? hja Vianlr (Jsa Ixiv. 6; Luke xiv. 33 ; Ps. xxxviii. 4; Hab. ii. 2 ; Acts xvi. 31). I looked, and saw him open the book and read therein; and, as he read, he wept, and trembled; and not being able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying, "What shall I do?" (Acts ii. 37). In this plight, therefore, he went home and refrained himself as long as he could, that his wife and children should not perceive his distress; but he could not be silent long, because that his trouble increased. Wherefore at length he brake his mind to his wife and children; and thus he began to talk to them. 0 my His outcry. S, and you the children of my bowels, , j. Jr dear friend, am in myself undone by reason of a burden that lieth hard upon me; moreover, I am for certain informed that this our city will be burned with lire from heaven, in which fearful overthrow both myself, with thee, my wife, and you my sweet babes, shall miserably come to ruin, , except (the which yet I see not) some lie knots no L ' may of escape way of escape can be found, whereby we may be delivered. At this his relations were sore amazed; not for that they believed that what he had said to them was true, but because they thought that some frenzy distemper had got into his head; therefore, it drawing towards night, and they hoping that sleep might settle his brains, with all has...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217761789
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/17/2009
  • Pages: 102
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.21 (d)

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may be as a goad in thy sides, to prick thee forward in the way thou must go. Then Christian began to gird up his loins, and to address himself to his journey. Then said the Interpreter, The Comforter be always with thee, good Christian, to guide thee in the way that leads to the city. So Christian went on his way, saying— Here I have seen things rare, and profitable; Things pleasant, dreadful, things to make me stable In what I have begun to take in hand; Then let me think on them, and understand Wherefore they showed me was, and let me be Thankful, O good Interpreter, to thee. Now I saw in my dream that the highway up which Christian was to go, was fenced on either side with a wall, and that wall is called Salvation. Up this way therefore did burdened Christian run, but not without great difficulty, because of the load on his back. He ran thus till he came at a place somewhat ascending, and upon that place stood a Cross, and a little below in the bottom, a Sepulchre. So I saw in my dream, that just as Christian came up with the Cross his burden loosed from off his shoulders, and fell from off his back; and began to tumble, and so continued to do, till it came to the mouth of the Sepulchre, where it fell in, and I saw it no more.1 Then was Christian glad and lightsome, and When Goa f i i nleasea ia of said with a merry heart, He hath given me rest burden, we are by his sorrow, and life by his death. Then he leap Jar jay. stood still a while, to look and wonder; for it .. was very surprising to him, that the sight of the Cross should thus ease him of his burden. He looked therefore, and looked again, even till thesprings that were in his head sent the waters down his iWho'sthis? the Pilgrim. How! 'tis very true, Old things are pass'd away, all's beeome n...
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2001

    Most comprehensible

    I had been searching for an 'authentic' translation of Pilgrim's Progress when I stumbled upon Cheryl V. Ford's unabridged, modern version of this terrific book. This particular translation includes many margin notes which are helpful in the full understanding of such a powerful work

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2000

    Chicken Soup For The Baby Christen Soul!

    I loved it !! Its a great book for young and old! Its' awsome!! It's the perfect book too teach christians how to handel the trials that come into their lives. Read it . . . it will do you good!! God Bless! ~ Cerasi =)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I've wanted to finish the Old English, original version of John

    I've wanted to finish the Old English, original version of John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress this year. I've finally done it. I have to admit, there were some tough times trying to get through this version. Case in point:

    "...for there was now no let in their way, no, not there where but now they were stopped with a pit."

    That one made the kids chuckle. But making it through the entire book was worth it. Knowing the context in which this wonderful allegory was written and experiencing that humble tinker painting pictures in my mind using beautiful language is worth every page. Some have said that The Pilgrim's Progress is the most widely read book of all time, next to the Bible. If you take the time to read through it, you'll understand why. Bunyan knew the human heart well, he knew the struggles of living the Christian life well and he knew the many different strengths and weaknesses of God's people, even after they are saved. He captured these things throughout this work and the story comes across not only highly entertaining and engaging, but also instructive and encouraging.

    If you have ever wanted to read this 17th century classic, but are scared or turned off by some of the archaic language, I would highly recommend Edward Hazelbaker's modern English version. It has excellent retention of the original flow of thought, but includes great cross references and thorough explanatory notes at the end of each chapter.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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