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The Pillars of the World (Tir Alainn Series #1)
     

The Pillars of the World (Tir Alainn Series #1)

4.3 74
by Anne Bishop
 

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The first novel in New York Times bestselling author Anne Bishop's Tir Alainn Trilogy.

The youngest in a long line of witches, Ari senses that things are changing—changing for the worse. For generations, her kin have tended the Old Places, keeping the land safe and fertile. But with the Summer Moon, the mood of her neighbors has soured. And

Overview

The first novel in New York Times bestselling author Anne Bishop's Tir Alainn Trilogy.

The youngest in a long line of witches, Ari senses that things are changing—changing for the worse. For generations, her kin have tended the Old Places, keeping the land safe and fertile. But with the Summer Moon, the mood of her neighbors has soured. And Ari is no longer safe.
 
The Fae have long ignored what occurs in the mortal world, passing through on their shadowy roads only long enough to amuse themselves. But the roads are slowly disappearing, leaving the Fae Clans isolated and alone.
 
Where harmony between the spiritual and the natural has always reigned, a dissonant chord now rings in the ears of both Fae and mortal. And when murmurs of a witch-hunt hum through the town, some begin to wonder if the different omens are notes in the same tune.
 
And all they have to guide them is a passing reference to something called the Pillars of the World...

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Raped, tortured, and killed, the witches of Sylvalan are disappearing quickly. Adolfo, an evil man bent on revenge for the cruelties done to him by his witch mother, is determined to kill every witch in the kingdom. Financed by the gentry and assisted by a handpicked army, a witch hunt begins that threatens the Fae, or fairy, world as well as the human world. When the hunt reaches Brightwood, however, a young witch named Ari might find assistance from the Fae—or be killed by them first. Ari herself is caught between conflicting loyalties when she takes a Fae lover for Midsummer Night and receives a marriage proposal from a human friend. As the Fae work to determine the mystery behind the legends of the Pillars of the World, Ari unravels her own mystery, the legacy of her ancestry. The unfolding answers impact Ari's decision and the future of a disappearing world. Highly reminiscent of Harlequin romances, this novel nevertheless delivers fast-paced adventure, a winsome heroine, and a satisfying conclusion. Although mired in formulaic good-versus-evil roles, some secondary characters are sufficiently intriguing to merit chronicles of their further adventures. Bishop's novel is an entertaining read, but graphic descriptions of sex and violence make it best suited for mature teens. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P S A/YA (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult and Young Adult). 2001, Roc, 420p, $6.99 pb. Ages 15 to Adult. Reviewer: Rebecca Van Dan SOURCE: VOYA, February 2002 (Vol. 24, No.6)
KLIATT
From the first scene of this story of high fantasy we are drawn into a world in trouble. Certain roads between Tir Alainn, the realm of the Fae (Faerie), and the mortal realm, are mysteriously closing. Clan dwelling places are disappearing, and wanderers, both human and Fae, who venture onto those roads as they are closing never come home again. Who is causing this destruction, and why? Who hates both Fae and mortals so much that he (she?) will see both destroyed? Could it be the small folk of legend? These elves, dryads, trolls, dwarves, and the like have never seemed to hate anyone; they're just sort of amoral. Dianna, Fae huntress and Lady of the Moon, asks her Bard, Aiden, and the Storyteller, Lyrra, to look for answers, and they don't like what they hear. There is one type of human, generally a female, who has some power and some magic. She is a friend of the small folk and a protector of the waters and trees in which they live. She is just different enough from ordinary mortals to be feared and hated by them. She is called wiccanfae—witch. One type of human actually hates witches enough to destroy them, and has enough mortal power to do it. This is the Inquisitor, who spreads rumors about witches that are fantastic lies, but with enough truth to mislead weaker folk into informing against women who mean only well. Bishop includes just enough shape-changing, sexual situations, and innuendoes to appeal to a YA audience without offending most parents. These situations are not over-simplified, either, and will also appeal to adult fans of the genre. Not an introduction to fantasy, or for very young YAs, but quite readable for the right audience. Category: Science Fiction, Fantasy &Horror. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2001, Penguin Putnam, Roc, 420p., Ages 16 to adult. Reviewer: Judith H. Silverman; Chevy Chase, MD

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101043844
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/01/2001
Series:
Tir Alainn Trilogy , #1
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
62,822
File size:
470 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Anne Bishop made her first short fiction sale in 1988. Her most recent work has appeared in White Swan, Black Raven and 365 Scary Stories. She lives in upstate New York.

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The Pillars of the World 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 72 reviews.
LibraryFan More than 1 year ago
With intriguing characters, epic plotline, and enchanting concepts, The Pillars of the World would make an outstanding movie trilogy (provided someone good took it on, so that the story could be protected). I highly recommend the entire trilogy for everyone who enjoys good fantasy writing.
MicheleLeesBookLove More than 1 year ago
I bought this book. Anne Bishop is a master world builder, bringing epic fantasy lands to life with a deft hand. In this trilogy the world is one of elemental magic, where fae and witches come to life and both are threatened by a sinister evil force. In this first book in the trilogy a witch with the gifts of fire and earth gets trapped by a bit of hedge love magic and, trying to avoid being abused, swears to give herself to a mysterious stallion who shares a summer holiday with her. The stallion turns out to be Lucian, the fae Lord of Fire in his animal form. Curious about this woman who sought him as a friend rather than as a breeder, Lucian begins an affair with Ari. In Tir Alainn, the fae are facing their own, much larger crisis. Whole sections of their enchanted land are vanishing, cut off by a mysterious misty nothingness. When Dianna, Lucian's twin and The Huntress, discovers Ari is a witch, whom some of the stories and songs of the land blame for the growing evil in the world, she also begins to foster an interest in Ari, determined to save her home at any costs. The truth of the lost places of Tir Alainn and a foul evil that's spreading through the land, is far more complicated than Lucian, Dianna and Ari know. In this first book three sides are drawn, those for good, those for evil, and those whose egos drive their actions rather than their heads. This is absolutely one of my favorite books. Bishop's world is so thick and sensory that even though I read this for the first time when it was first published around 2002 I continue to read the triology over and over, nearly every year and have yet to tire of it. Bishop's only flaw is a skew toward "Women are beautiful and wonderful and men are wicked and cruel" themes, and of all her work this series balances it out the best. Despite great or little power, Bishop's characters are real people, often gifted with a sense of humor which balances out the darker elements of the stories. Here you will find neither damsels in distress nor super powered Janeways. The balance between male and female, good and evil are maintained delicately, but clearly, making this whole trilogy a pleasure to read and reread.
KMO88 More than 1 year ago
This is a truly wonderful and epic fantasy adventure. Taking the perspective of multiple characters gives the story a whole breadth of adventure and makes the story all the more interesting. The first book sets the stage for the changing of a world so like and yet unlike our own world. The book reminds us of the importance of everyone within the world and of respecting our world and appreciating it. Give back what we take and do no harm, those are the mottos promoted in Anne Bishop's three books. This first book has us fall in the love with the characters and the individual story of one of the Mother's daughters, a witch with a decent amount of power and magic about her. And we hope for her survival as the Black Coats begin their hunt to rid the world of good magic. This book is a wonderful pleasure read with an important message.
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Ravenshorn More than 1 year ago
The Author is very good at describing the characters, surroundings in the story and of the people themselves in this book. You won't want to put it down! I am excited to get on to reading the next book in the series!
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