Overview

Joyce never used to care that much about how she looked, but that was before she met JFK—John Ford Kang, the most gorgeous guy in school. And it doesn’t help that she’s constantly being compared to her beautiful older sister, Helen. Then her rich plastic-surgery-addict aunt offers Joyce a gift to “fix” a part of herself she’d never realized needed fixing—her eyes. Joyce has heard of the fold surgery—a common procedure meant to make Asian women’s eyes seem “prettier” and more “American”—but she’s not sure she ...
See more details below
The Fold

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price

Overview

Joyce never used to care that much about how she looked, but that was before she met JFK—John Ford Kang, the most gorgeous guy in school. And it doesn’t help that she’s constantly being compared to her beautiful older sister, Helen. Then her rich plastic-surgery-addict aunt offers Joyce a gift to “fix” a part of herself she’d never realized needed fixing—her eyes. Joyce has heard of the fold surgery—a common procedure meant to make Asian women’s eyes seem “prettier” and more “American”—but she’s not sure she wants to go through with it. Her friend Gina can’t believe she isn’t thrilled. After all, the plastic surgeon has shown Joyce that her new eyes will make her look just like Helen—but is that necessarily a good thing?

Printz Award–winning author An Na has created a surprisingly funny and thought-provoking look at notions of beauty, who sets the standards and how they affect us all. Joyce’s decision is sure to spark heated discussions about the beauty myths readers confront in their own lives.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The Printz Award-winning author of A Step from Heaven goes lightweight, or lighter, in this story about a Korean-American teenager whose wealthy aunt has just won a lottery and offers her plastic surgery for double eyelid folds. On the one hand, Joyce longs to be as beautiful as her perfect, high-achieving older sister, Helen, but she can't stand pain. Yet how else will she attract her handsome classmate, John Ford Kang, who confuses her with their ugly Korean-American classmate? Then again, does she really want to be like Aunt Gomo, who has had so much cosmetic surgery that Joyce and her younger brother have nicknamed her Michael "for the singer who had altered his appearance beyond recognition"? In creating her bumbling, would-be Everygirl protagonist, Na gives only surface attention to the issues she raises: the pressures of conventional standards of beauty, especially Western demands on Asian women; conformity versus individuality (Joyce is the last in the family to discover that Helen is gay). Joyce remains focused on appearances, being rude to the generous, sensitive boy who has cystic acne, liking John Ford Kang for his looks and learning tricks to make her eyes appear less Asian. By the end, the suffering of supporting characters seems to have been airbrushed away. Ages 12-up. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
VOYA
Joyce's wealthy paternal aunt, Gomo, decides to give almost everyone in her family something that might improve his or her appearance: high heels for height-challenged Apa, permanent makeup for Uhmma, pills to spark growth for preteen Andy, and plastic surgery for Joyce. As Joyce watches one family member after another endure the adverse effects of Gomo's gifts-Uhmma's head swells like a balloon, Andy suffers humiliating intestinal distress-she decides to think carefully about whether double eyelid fold surgery is necessary. On one hand, getting the folds put in her eyelids might make her attractive enough to trap JFK (John Ford Kang). On the other hand, Joyce realizes that the procedure is a serious and potentially dangerous one. For most young women, especially women of color, the quest for beauty is a burden. Whether it is dark or blemished skin, full lips and hips, or some other perceived "imperfection," increasingly more women feel pressured to invest in cosmetic surgery. This novel can spark dialogue with young adults about society's obsession with certain physical attributes (thin bodies and long, straight hair) and its disdain for others (ethnic features, curly hair, Rubenesque figures, and so on). Although it might take a few chapters before readers become invested in Joyce's story, those who stick with it will find that Na skillfully combines solemnity, humor, and romance. Some readers might identify with the novel's focus on sibling rivalry, first love, and self-esteem, whereas others adamant about changing something about themselves might gain a new perspective. Reviewer: KaaVonia Hinton-Johnson
Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
What would you do if your wealthy auntie offered to give you whatever you most wished for…well at least what she thought you should most wish for? Between her junior and senior year of high school, Joyce is offered a chance to be more beautiful—more like her older, smarter, accomplished sister—by getting plastic surgery to put folds in her eyelids. Never mind that her aunt's offer is a backhanded slap at her appearance, or that she cannot stand even the thought of pain or look at the pictures of the procedure without getting sick. Joyce wants the cutest guy in her school to notice her and that is worth it, is it not? In spite of one curve ball in the plot when we learn the perfect older sister is not so perfect after all, the plot of this Printz award-winning author's newest book is very predictable. Joyce makes all the right decisions and probably gets the guy in the end. Even so there are some really worthwhile reasons to have this book in a collection. This is, underneath the dithering about the usual issues of teen angst—sibling rivalry, peer relations, gossip, family obligations—a hard look at how we push people into trying to look a certain way and the punishments we inflict when they do not. Is it okay to take medication for your acne, get braces for your crooked teeth? Most of us would say sure. So why draw the line at plastic surgery to make your eyes look more acceptable, more Western? This would be a great book to initiate discussion about discrimination on the basis of appearance or any differences. Reviewer: Paula McMillen, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

Gr 8-10- As one of only a handful of Asian-American students at her posh Los Angeles high school, 16-year-old Joyce Park has never felt as though she fits in. In the throes of an intense crush on John Ford Kang, a gorgeous and aloof classmate, she is consumed with worry about the way she looks, especially in comparison to her beautiful older sister, a social and academic superstar who seems to get everything she wants. Then her cosmetic surgery-addicted aunt comes into a lottery windfall and offers Joyce a gift: surgery to add a fold to her eyelids, transforming her Korean features into something more Western and, it is suggested, more beautiful. At first Joyce is appalled at the idea, but as she begins to obsess about the eyes of the Asian women around her, she becomes increasingly convinced that "the fold" is all that lies between her imperfect appearance and the ideal of feminine beauty. But will the surgery require her to give up her sense of herself in the process? Na explores issues of beauty and ethnic identity with sensitivity and wit. Her protagonist is carefully and realistically drawn; even as the novel is guided by a larger message about self-esteem, Joyce's struggles and choices never seem predetermined for didactic purposes. This story will speak to both Asian-American teens and other adolescents dealing with issues related to the way that they look, the way they wish to be perceived, and the often painful distance between the two.-Meredith Robbins, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School, New York City

Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The self-imposed pressure to appear as beautiful as her older sister is accentuated by a makeover gift Joyce receives from her domineering family benefactor, Aunt Gomo. The prospect of attracting the good-looking JFK (John Ford Kang) isn't the only concern for this Korean teen who's balancing school and family responsibilities with her parent's expectations for daily assistance in their busy restaurant. But when it becomes clear that the makeover extends to plastic surgery to create a western-looking fold in her eyelids, Joyce is torn between respectfully complying and her discomfort in surgically creating a look more acceptable to her Aunt, who has appeased her own insecurities with surgery. Na poses a two-fold dilemma for girls of all races. How should physical beauty be interpreted and to what extent should a girl be coerced into developing positive self-confidence? Na deftly provides alternative perspectives with some humorous disaster scenarios as consequences of Aunt Gomo's good intentions with other family members' "improvement gifts." But Helen, the shy and soon-to-be-coming-out lesbian sister, ultimately helps Joyce realize self-respect leads to self-esteem and admiration for each other's beautiful differences. A lighthearted and thought-provoking look at a serious teen issue. (Fiction. 12-15)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101652275
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 4/10/2008
  • Series: SHOW Series
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 727,348
  • Age range: 10 years
  • File size: 363 KB

Meet the Author

An Na is the author of Wait for Me and A Step from Heaven (National Book Award Finalist and Printz Award winner). She lives in Montpelier, Vermont.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2012

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 14, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Rummel for TeensReadToo.com

    Corliss's uncle landed her an internship on TV's hottest upcoming show. <BR/><BR/>Unfortunately, she didn't realize that she'd be spending her days breaking up the on-set couple, trying to help a washed-up star, and smoothing out issues on set -- all while keeping the producer's ego intact. <BR/><BR/>It wasn't the job she signed up for, but she can't force herself to quit. <BR/><BR/>Can she keep the set from going down in flames? <BR/><BR/>Jordan Cooke takes a behind-the-scenes look at the making of a TV show. Readers who loved The OC and now Gossip Girl will enjoy reading about the drama on set after the cameras stop rolling.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2013

    Ya

    Ya

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2012

    Anna

    K

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2012

    Random

    ( • ) ( • ) boo.bies!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)