×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Pimp (Max Fisher and Angela Petrakos Series #4)
     

Pimp (Max Fisher and Angela Petrakos Series #4)

5.0 1
by Ken Bruen
 

See All Formats & Editions

DEALING… PRODUCING…
    ALL IN A DAY’S WORK FOR A DRUGLORD.
        OR IN HOLLYWOOD.

Ruined and on the lam, former drug kingpin Max Fisher stumbles upon the 
biggest discovery of his crooked life: a designer drug called PIMP that could put him back on top. Meanwhile, a certain femme fatale from his

Overview

DEALING… PRODUCING…
    ALL IN A DAY’S WORK FOR A DRUGLORD.
        OR IN HOLLYWOOD.

Ruined and on the lam, former drug kingpin Max Fisher stumbles upon the 
biggest discovery of his crooked life: a designer drug called PIMP that could put him back on top. Meanwhile, a certain femme fatale from his past is pursuing a comeback dream of her own, setting herself up in Hollywood as producer of a series based on her and Max’s life story. But even in La-La Land, happy endings are hard to come by, especially with both the cops and your enemies in the drug trade coming after you…

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
01/04/2016
In Bruen and Starr’s scattershot fourth Max Fisher noir (after 2008’s The Max), a new designer drug called PIMP (an acronym for peyote, insulin, mescaline, and psychosis) is poised to give the ne’er-do-well New York City “businessman” (i.e., drug dealer) another shot at the big time. Since the first book in the series, 2006’s Bust, in which Max and his secretary, Angela Petrakos, plotted to kill his wife, Max has fallen on hard times, appearing after his plastic surgery “like Philip Seymour Hoffman after the autopsy.” Meanwhile, Angela has stumbled as well, making a living in porn. But she’s caught a break, too. In a metafictional twist, a movie of Bust is in heated development, and she’s determined to produce and star. The usual torrent of pop culture references (and relentless self-references) heap satire on filmmaking and crime writing as Bruen and Starr take a comic look back at their initial collaboration. Longtime fans may enjoy the 10th-anniversary antics, but new readers might want to start with Bust and work their way up. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"To add to the already outlandish black comedy, the authors make liberal use of a wide variety of celebrity's names to further illustrate the absurd situations portrayed, as well as double- (and) triple-crosses, blunders, miscalculations, violence, sex and blackmail. All in good fun." - Midwest Book Review

“Fast-paced, engrossingly entertaining, Pimp is outrageously funny.” -  New York Journal of Books

"In Bruen and Starr’s scattershot fourth Max Fisher noir (after 2008’s The Max), a new designer drug called PIMP (an acronym for peyoteinsulin,mescaline, and psychosis) is poised to give the ne’er-do-well New York City “businessman” (i.e., drug dealer) another shot at the big time. Since the first book in the series, 2006’s Bust, in which Max and his secretary, Angela Petrakos, plotted to kill his wife, Max has fallen on hard times, appearing after his plastic surgery “like Philip Seymour Hoffman after the autopsy.” Meanwhile, Angela has stumbled as well, making a living in porn. But she’s caught a break, too. In a metafictional twist, a movie of Bust is in heated development, and she’s determined to produce and star. The usual torrent of pop culture references (and relentless self-references) heap satire on filmmaking and crime writing as Bruen and Starr take a comic look back at their initial collaboration. Longtime fans may enjoy the 10th-anniversary antics, but new readers might want to start with Bust and work their way up." - Publishers Weekly

"I want to kill these guys—except I can’t stop laughing long enough."
—Lee Child
 
"Downright hilarious and bloodthirsty in the best possible way.
With all the dirt and more you could ask about Hollywood and the world of crime publishing."
—Maxim Jakubowski
 
"Perfect for those who like to laugh while the blood flows."
—Booklist

"You won't put this delightfully twisted novel down until the last hot page, and then reluctantly." - Marvin Minkler First Editions

"PIMP is a wild ride of sheer fun and entertainment. Fans of both Bruen and Starr will love this book.... Hard Case Crime once again proves why they are the greatest hard-boiled and noir publishing house in the world." - BookReporter 

“This hilarious series and its hapless, deluded main characters is like no other in the entire contemporary crime fiction world." - Bookgasm

Kirkus Reviews
2015-12-21
A former drug kingpin stumbles on a new designer drug and uses it to fuel his comeback in the fourth entry of the Max Fisher series. Tending bar at an Irish saloon, Max finds a young dealer who has come up with a drug whose acronym is PIMP. Employing his usual sleazy means, Max takes control of distribution and is soon once more riding high. Meanwhile, Angela, the femme fatale who's dogged him through the series, is in Hollywood, angling to get a film made about her and Max. There's not so much a plot as there are a series of incidents on which the authors hang various wisecracks, inside jokes, and cutesy little nods to their pals in the crime fiction biz. Their idea of characterization is to have a Jamaican good-time gal end every sentence with "mon" or to have a French hood stand up for a woman's honor by killing her after she's been raped by a thug in his employ. The writing is for people who find the celebrity gossip on an average episode of TMZ too restrained. On the opening page, Max's face is compared to "Philip Seymour Hoffman after the autopsy." Hoffman is later identified as the actor who "got like an Oscar for playing a faggot." To be offended would be to take the authors' pathetic bait. We're told the name PIMP stands for the mixture of peyote, insulin, mescaline, and psychosis. Pulp, Idiocy, Snark, and Scumminess would have been a more truthful acronym.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781783295692
Publisher:
Titan
Publication date:
03/15/2016
Series:
Max Fisher and Angela Petrakos Series , #4
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
570,414
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 5.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Ken Bruen was nominated for nearly every major award in the mystery field (and won the Shamus Award) for his book The Guards, the first in his series about Jack Taylor and his first book to be published in the United States.  In addition to his work as a novelist, Bruen has a Ph.D. in metaphysics and spent 25 years as a teacher in Africa, Japan, Southeast Asia, and South America.

The author of the first original novel ever published in the prestigious Vintage/Black Lizard line (Hard Feelings), Jason Starr has won raves for his work from publications ranging from The New York Times to Entertainment Weekly, which compared him to Jim Thompson and James M. Cain. In 2004, he received the Barry Award for his novel Tough Luck, and in 2005 he won the Anthony Award for Twisted City. He also writes comics for Marvel and DC, as well as original graphic novels. He lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Pimp 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
tedfeit0 More than 1 year ago
After a long lull, Ken Bruen and Jason Starr turned their attention to another Max Fisher novel, and it was well worth the wait. “Pimp” is not only a fantastic noir creation, but a funny, satirical put-on, filled with some of the most creative writing this reader has seen in a long time. Before we go any further, the title refers not to a person running prostitutes, but a designer drug, that Max has labeled with the tag line, “it takes care of you.” The plot is simple: Max, in hiding in the Pacific Northwest since his escape from Attica, finds the drug and uses it for a comeback, first in New York City until he learns that a TV program is being made of his exploits based on his life story in “Bust” (the last of three previous novels by these award-winning authors). So he takes off for Los Angeles, where he finds his former secretary ensconced as a co-producer of the program (along with an assortment of other characters). This, of course, makes for a new set of funny and improbable complications, not to mention more bodies to add to Max’s collection. To add to the already outlandish black comedy, the authors make liberal use of a wide variety of celebrity’s names to further illustrate the absurd situations portrayed, as well as double- (and) triple-crosses, blunders, miscalculations, violence, sex and blackmail. All in good fun. Highly recommended.