PINK

( 2 )

Overview

Yumiko moonlights as a call girl because her day job doesn't pay enough to feed her pet Croc. Haru an aspiring writer who has nothing to say, sleeps with a woman his mother's age not just for the money but to work on his "powers of observation". So when Yumi's step-mom turns out to be Haru's sugar-mommy, it is time for shenanigans. A little bit of drinking, a little bit of blackmail and a visit with Croc is enough to change lives and maybe add some color to a comfortable but ...
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Overview

Yumiko moonlights as a call girl because her day job doesn't pay enough to feed her pet Croc. Haru an aspiring writer who has nothing to say, sleeps with a woman his mother's age not just for the money but to work on his "powers of observation". So when Yumi's step-mom turns out to be Haru's sugar-mommy, it is time for shenanigans. A little bit of drinking, a little bit of blackmail and a visit with Croc is enough to change lives and maybe add some color to a comfortable but bland life.

Daddy kept Keiko's mom as a pet; she keeps Haru as a pet; I keep Croc as a pet... I Yumiko someone else's pet?? Is she willing to let someone care for her like that?

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781939130129
  • Publisher: Vertical, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/26/2013
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 532,259
  • Product dimensions: 5.84 (w) x 8.34 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Kyoko Okazaki, born December 13, 1963, is considered by many as one of the mothers of josei (women's) comics. Renowned for her mimimalist designs and tendancy to cover controversial themes, Okazaki cut her teeth in the world adult comics in 1980's.

While studying at Atomi University, Okazaki made her debut in Cartoon Burikko, an experiemental adult comic anthology primarily aimed at men. Okazaki would then turn her focus to women's issues. Focusing on the issues of contemporary young women, Okazaki never shied away from street culture, high fashion and drug use in her naratives. She would then take on her first a long-running series called Tokyo Girls Bravo; a rare comic to be published a fashion magazine. Okazaki has been in retirement since the end of the last century as she recovers from a life-threatening traffic accident.

Okazaki has received both the Japan Media Arts Award and the Osamu Tezuka Cultural Award for her work on Helter Skelter which was adapted into a motion picture in 2012 (now screening in the US in 2013).

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 26, 2014

    In study of colour and psychological significance pink is a hue

    In study of colour and psychological significance pink is a hue favoured most commonly by either the indulged soul used to privilege, or someone seeking to regain the innocence of childhood. Yumi the main character of Pink, a women’s comic by Kyoko Okazaki done in 1989, is both. There is much that can be said about Pink, analyzed, read over and over. It’s a story demanding a certain level of attention and thought from the reader. Some cultural notes for the English edition would have been of use as well since the comic captures a Japan of decades ago. There are plenty of references to pop culture as well as then current events of which understanding is likely lost without familiarity or explanation. Like one character in the story who expresses that their mind always has things in it that when written down come out as gibberish and rambling, Pink is a book stuffed with things to say and words probably don’t suffice in the end about what it all means.

    On a purely individual level, I strongly have an aversion to Pink. Particular content in the story strikes a personal sensitivity evoking upsetting negative emotions. To be certain this is a mature Japanese comic for a mature audience with nudity, adult themes, sexual content and violence. Any of these aspects might warrant reader discretion. How much the inclusion or presentation of each in Pink is intended as shock or vulgarity is still something I’m undecided about. However, the story includes the one thing I can’t handle even though it’s fictional. Susceptible animal lovers should be warned or properly prepared.

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  • Posted January 9, 2014

    This story is absolutely interesting, i loved the story and all

    This story is absolutely interesting, i loved the story and all the characters. It might be the best read for everyone because it does have sexual content in it however the story is great. I would recommend this to an adult or teenager, fantastic read

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