Pink

Pink

4.4 88
by Lili Wilkinson
     
 

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Ava is tired of her ultracool attitude, ultraradical politics, and ultrablack clothing. She's ready to try something new—she's even ready to be someone new. Someone who fits in, someone with a gorgeous boyfriend, someone who wears pink.

But Ava soon finds that changing herself is more complicated than changing her wardrobe. Even getting involved in the

Overview

Ava is tired of her ultracool attitude, ultraradical politics, and ultrablack clothing. She's ready to try something new—she's even ready to be someone new. Someone who fits in, someone with a gorgeous boyfriend, someone who wears pink.

But Ava soon finds that changing herself is more complicated than changing her wardrobe. Even getting involved in the school musical raises issues she never imagined. As she faces surprising choices and unforeseen consequences, Ava wonders if she will ever figure out who she really wants to be.

Pink received an American Library Association Stonewall Award Honor for exceptional merit relating to the gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender experience.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Ava has a lot going for her. She's smart and has sophisticated Chloe as a girlfriend, but she wants to reinvent herself as someone more traditionally feminine—like "girls who liked boys." When she transfers to an elite private school, she is taken in by a group of high-achievers, but finds it difficult to fit in with their seeming perfection. Rejected from the school play, Ava volunteers with the stage crew instead, and begins bonding with the misfits who build sets. But her popular friends judge them harshly, and Ava also faces constant anxiety as she tries to keep her relationship with Chloe a secret. Though readers will likely empathize with Ava's efforts to compartmentalize her life, the thoughtful conversations she has about the complexity of gender and identity, both with her stage crew friends and her parents, make up the strongest parts of Australian author Wilkinson's story. Ava's worlds collide in a melodramatic conclusion that strains believability, but her final realization ("Maybe I didn't have to choose for sure now") is cogent and satisfying. Ages 12–up. (Feb.)
VOYA - Sara Martin
Much to the chagrin of her girlfriend and parents, Ava decides to transfer to a progressive private high school in the hopes of trying to be "normal"—where she can care about doing well in school, try to fit in with the popular crowd (the Pastels), shed her goth persona, wear pink, and maybe even kiss a boy. To jumpstart her new life, she decides to audition for the school musical, with less than stellar results. With her spectacular audition flop behind her, Ava is still determined to get involved and decides to volunteer with the aptly named and self-proclaimed "stage crew freaks" (aka the Screws). As she tries to mold herself to fit other people's expectations, she finds she does not fit anywhere. Although the Screws are viewed with disdain by the Pastels, "none of them seemed exhausted from being themselves," which causes Ava to question herself and her own preconceptions. Australian author Lili Wilkinson takes a witty, refreshing look at high school and adolescence that obliterates stereotypes along the way. The novel is in turn laugh-out-loud funny, endearing, and heartbreaking as Ava repeatedly steps into teenage social land mines—with unexpected results. Because Wilkinson does not rely on stereotypes, the characters are well developed, and interactions between them feel genuine. Ava's story will undoubtedly engage readers . . . and maybe even cause them question their own assumptions. Give Pink to teens who like their humor with a healthy dose of intelligence, such as fans of John Green. Reviewer: Sara Martin
VOYA - Raluca Topliceanu
Similar to the movie Mean Girls, Pink vividly explores Ava's quest to belong. She is torn between the perfect Pastels—shallow, gorgeous, and powerful—and the Screws—outcasts who are not afraid to express who they are. Right from the start, her personality comes into focus through clever, raw, and genuine dialogue. Each character becomes real and claims the reader's heart; it will be hard to forget this heart-warming tale of forgiveness, belonging, and friendship. Reviewer: Raluca Topliceanu, Teen Reviewer
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-Ava, an Australian teen, has begged her parents to let her transfer from her underachieving high school to an exclusive and rigorous private school. Her parents, open-minded progressives who threw a party to celebrate her coming out, reluctantly agree. Her girlfriend, Chloe, sophisticated, intellectual, and highly possessive, is also not pleased. Ava is immediately befriended by Alexis, petite, perky, popular, and intelligent, who encourages Ava to audition for the school musical. Humiliated by a disastrous audition, she joins the stage crew, made up of the school's outcasts and oddballs. Ava doesn't tell anyone about her sexual identity and withdraws from Chloe. She becomes closer to her stage-crew friends, while her more popular friends disdain her involvement with them. Failed attempts at matchmaking, a final argument with Chloe, and the revelation that she is not sure of her sexual orientation create a roller-coaster of emotions. While Ava is a sympathetic character who feels that she has disappointed a lot of people and doesn't know how to make amends, Chloe becomes increasingly insufferable. Wilkinson authentically captures the social awkwardness of high school life and love. Passionate confessions made by several key characters are a bit over-the-top but don't distract from the story. Some characters are rather quick to forgive past wrongs, but this is an entertaining story about teen angst, sexual identity, and high school relationships from a promising debut author.—Jennifer Schultz, Fauquier County Public Library, Warrenton, VA
Kirkus Reviews

Frustrated at being penned in by her counterculture parents, 17-year-old Ava shifts away from her unconventional school and a longstanding relationship with her beautiful but sometimes chilly girlfriend in this funny and poignant Australian import. She is unsure about many things; her decision toswitch to anacademically rigorous high school is her first step in trying out a new persona. Her plans also include wearing the soft pink sweater of her dreams, attempting to fit into the mainstreamand possibly, just maybe, dating a boy. Nothing turns out as she'd expected, though, and Ava finds herself spending a lot of time with the outcast members of her new school's stage crew (or "Screw" as they've proclaimed themselves), to whom she relates much more than she'd like to admit. Ostensibly a focus of the novel is Ava's process of understanding her sexuality, but her search for belonging doesn't stop there. While the resolution of her struggle is too predictable, the delightfully authentic,bawdy dialogue and cast of intensely likable misfits energetically propel this story forward. Readers will enjoy the ride. (Fiction. 13 & up)

Booklist
“Refreshing.”
Justine Larbalestier
“I laughed, I cried and I occasionally burst into song.”
John Green
“This fun, razor-sharp, and moving novel reminds us that pink—like love—is a many-splendored thing. Read it. It might just change your life.”
Michael Cart
“Fit in or be yourself? Wilkinson explores this universal dilemma with just the right mix of sensitivity, ambiguity, insight, wit, and-yes-wisdom. A lovely, funny, and altogether engaging book!”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061926532
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/08/2011
Pages:
310
Product dimensions:
8.34(w) x 5.74(h) x 1.11(d)
Lexile:
HL630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

What People are saying about this

Michael Cart
“Fit in or be yourself? Wilkinson explores this universal dilemma with just the right mix of sensitivity, ambiguity, insight, wit, and-yes-wisdom. A lovely, funny, and altogether engaging book!”
John Green
“This fun, razor-sharp, and moving novel reminds us that pink—like love—is a many-splendored thing. Read it. It might just change your life.”

Meet the Author

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Lili Wilkinson was first published when she was twelve, in Voiceworks magazine. After studying creative arts at Melbourne University, Ms. Wilkinson began working for the Centre for Youth Literature at the State Library of Victoria, where she managed a website for teens about books and reading. She spends most of her time reading and writing books for teens, but when she's not doing that, she's usually hanging out with friends, watching DVDs, and making monsters out of wool. Pink is her U.S. debut.

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Pink 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 88 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i was at my local library looking at the new books section and i saw this book. i picked it up intrigued and i read the description. i decided to check it out and boy am i glad i did. it really explores a different type of book and is perfect for anyone looking for a good read
Reagan Todd More than 1 year ago
so far this book is really good im on the 6th chapter and it really good!!! i xan hardly put it down!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was very good. Ava the main charecter is struggling to find her place in the world. I'm 13 and i thought itwas appropriate for me. Pretty good!! A few tgings happened in th plot that wern't followed up on in the next chapter. Not enough to notice though. Grade:B
epicrat More than 1 year ago
I forget where I first heard about pink, but I knew that I had to read it and I knew that I loved its slick cover design. Fast forward a year to now, and I can regretfully say that pink is the book I should have read sooner than later because it is one of those rare sock-rocking books that make up for all the reading FAIL! in my TBR pile. THE GOOD BITS {Girl cut from a different cloth} I loved the concept of Ava trying to figure out not only her identity, but also her sexuality. For some teenagers, these might be one and the same and quite obvious, but I think Ava represents those in-betweeners who feel alone in their indecision and uncertainties. Is she still a feminist if she likes the color pink? How can she crush on a boy when she is involved with a girl? Can two girls be friends if one of them is a lesbian? Is it too late to change your mind and/or change teams? Lili Wilkinson treads carefully and thoughtfully as the teenagers try to figure out themselves as well as each other in this whole crazy mess we fondly label as “high school.” {You eat, sleep, and breathe tech} There are no words to explain why I have such high regards to theater techies. I never really buried myself into the gritty underbelly of theater since it definitely required more commitment than I could handle in high school, but I could feel its allure. Set changes are the BEST. THING. EVER! to watch. In pink, I loved the cranky old stage manager, the geeky banter and random “would you rather” questions, and can I get a shout-out to Boys from the Dwarf? These were my people, and I always love watching the main character fall in love with them too. pink is a homage to techies out there, and I loved every moment of it! {Think PINK} This color pops up a lot in this book, and I love how the ending comes together for Ava, her girlfriend, and her classmates. The story begins with a pink sweater of incredible softness – what Ava deems as “normal” clothes and not the black chicness that her parents and girlfriend prefer. As a former pink-hater, I too can appreciate Ava’s embrace of the pink. Sure, it may be considered the color of girly power, but in the end it is just a color – and if we want to wear said color, it does not necessarily lead to simpering or emotional trainwrecks. In this book, pink becomes Ava’s trademark – it may have started out as a way to feel normal, but pink is the color that makes her happy inside. THE BAD BITS {Nothing} If there were any bad bits to this story, Lili Wilkinson just tickled me pink with everything else that I don’t remember them. Maybe that the ending tied together a little too perfectly? But, honestly, I wouldn’t have imagined it any other way. THE OVERALL Why did I wait so long to have my socks rocked by pink? I am not sure, but I am hoping that YOU do not waste any more time! The characters are far from perfect, but together they paint such a heartfelt and honest picture of the confusion everyone goes through in life. I laughed a lot, cried some, and enjoyed the entirety of pink – and when I reached the last page, I sighed with such satisfaction for a story well done!
Lauren Curnutte More than 1 year ago
I win this book in book firm through a contest, but it's awesome! I would have paid money fo it without hesitation! I reccomend it to anyone! It's interesting and very addicting. I highly reccomend you at least read the sample.
Anonymous 5 months ago
Hello?
Anonymous 5 months ago
Walks in
Anonymous 8 months ago
Can i come-christian;)
Anonymous 8 months ago
Im here ill be back i have to take ashower
Anonymous 9 months ago
I want some too..
Anonymous 9 months ago
*smiles* hey.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Walks in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You are everywhere lol.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was okay, I was kind of dissapointed. I finished it in a few hours. It was really funny at parts, so it was worth the read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Notices alex and cant stop
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in wearing a black tho<_>ng and a skim<_>py lacey black br<_>a that is making her boo<_>bs bigger
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Angi walked in yawning...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I meant to say im bi
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He smirks. "Whatever. Go back to playing with those girls."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
walks in a short black dress and a black heels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Liam...