Pinky And Rex And The Bully: Ready-To-Read Level 3

Pinky And Rex And The Bully: Ready-To-Read Level 3

by James Howe, Melissa Sweet
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Pinky's favorite color is pink, and his best friend, Rex, is a girl. Kevin, the third-grade bully, says that makes Pinky a sissy. Deep down, Pinky thinks Kevin is wrong, but he's still worried. Does Pinky have to give up his favorite things, and worse, does he have to give up his best friend?

Overview

Pinky's favorite color is pink, and his best friend, Rex, is a girl. Kevin, the third-grade bully, says that makes Pinky a sissy. Deep down, Pinky thinks Kevin is wrong, but he's still worried. Does Pinky have to give up his favorite things, and worse, does he have to give up his best friend?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Pinky is confused. He does like the color pink and his best friend is a girl. Does this make him a sissy? After repeated taunts by Kevin, the bully, Pinky decides that maybe he shouldn't like pink and maybe he should start going by the name Billy. With the help of his neighbor, Mrs. Morgan, he realizes it is difficult to be different. In the end he stands up to a bully and is true to himself.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3Pinky is forced into an identity crisis when his nickname and favorite color is deemed girlish by a bully. He wonders if, now that he's seven, it's time to change. An elderly neighbor suggests that he remain true to himself and question the "rules of behavior" instead. With his pal Rex (a girl) at his side, Pinky verbally confronts his tormentor. The older boy's aggressive bluster crumbles in the face of Pinky's new confidence. As in the previous books in the series, Howe affirms that boys (and girls) can be whatever they want to be. He fashions engaging characters who respond to their situations in a realistic, childlike fashion. Sweet's watercolor illustrations complement the gentle tale. Pair this title with Dan Millman's Secret of the Peaceful Warrior (H.J. Kramer, 1991), and you'll have ample food for a lively discussion on how children can respect one another and resolve their differences in a nonviolent manner.Marilyn Taniguchi, Santa Monica Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
This anachronistic entry about a popular duo in the Ready-to- Read series addresses gender issues for newly independent readers. Second-grader Pinky is bullied by third-grader Kevin for his friendship with a girl, best buddy Rex, and for his love of the color pink. Kevin warns Anthony not to play with Pinky, or "You might turn into a girl, too!" Pinky, whose real name is William, is upset enough that he asks to be called Billy and decides to end his friendship with Rex, too. An elderly neighbor, Mrs. Morgan, tells him her own childhood tale of lost identity, and Pinky finds the courage to stare Kevin down.

Howe (Pinky and Rex and the New Baby, 1993, etc.) sends a positive message to children to be themselves, an idea sensitively illustrated by Sweet. But Mrs. Morgan's monologues are laced with preachiness and compassion that seem more convenient than real. Meanwhile, Rex is only a marginal figure, barely sketched into the tale; all her behavior is described rather than shown.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689808340
Publisher:
Simon Spotlight
Publication date:
04/01/1996
Series:
Pinky & Rex Series
Edition description:
Repackage
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
95,060
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
480L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

James Howe is the author of more than ninety books for young readers, including the modern classic Bunnicula and its highly popular sequels. In 2001, Howe published The Misfits, the story of four outcast seventh-graders who try to end name-calling in their school. The Misfits is now widely read and studied in middle schools throughout the country, and was the inspiration for the national movement known as No Name-Calling Week (NoNameCallingWeek.org), an event observed by thousands of middle and elementary schools annually. There are three companion novels to The Misfits: Totally Joe (2005), Addie on the Inside (2011), and Also Known as Elvis (2014). Howe’s many other books for children from preschool through teens frequently deal with the acceptance of difference and being true to oneself. Visit him online at JamesHowe.com.

Melissa Sweet has illustrated more than eighty children’s books, including the Caldecott Honor books The Right Word and A River of Words: The Story of William Carlos Williams both written by Jen Bryant. She also wrote and illustrated Tupelo Rides the Rails; Carmine: A Little More Red, which was a New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Book; and Balloons Over Broadway, a picture book biography that was named a 2011 Publishers Weekly Best Nonfiction Picture Book. When she is not in her studio, Melissa can be found taking an art class, hiking with her dogs, or riding her bicycle. She lives with her family in Rockport, Maine.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >