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Pinky and Rex and the School Play (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)
     

Pinky and Rex and the School Play (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

by James Howe, Melissa Sweet (Illustrator)
 

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Pinky really wants to be an actor and is sure he'll get the lead in the school play. Rex, on the other hand, wants nothing to do with being on stage. She's afraid she'll forget her lines — or worse. Everything changes when Pinky convinces Rex to go with him to the tryouts. Will Pinky and Rex still be best friends when the show is over?

Overview

Pinky really wants to be an actor and is sure he'll get the lead in the school play. Rex, on the other hand, wants nothing to do with being on stage. She's afraid she'll forget her lines — or worse. Everything changes when Pinky convinces Rex to go with him to the tryouts. Will Pinky and Rex still be best friends when the show is over?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Primary students will be familiar with Pinky and Rex from their many previous adventures. Strangely, Rex is the girl character and Pinky the boy character; they are best friends who eat lunch together, talk on the phone, and share secrets. When Pinky confides to Rex about his desire to be the star in the school play he pleads with her to come give him moral support. To get out of spelling class, Rex agrees to go to the tryouts and keep Pinky company. The relationship changes when Rex innocently gets the lead in the school play. Originally written in 1998, this book covers a timely topic about allowing jealousy and selfish desires to interfere with a close friendship. A great book to use when teaching character education and helping children deal with issues of caring, friendship, and encouragement for others. A Level 3 "Ready to Read" book, it has longer chapters and more challenging vocabulary. The subtle watercolor illustrations are charming and bridge the gap between picture book and reader. The reinforced library binding by Spotlight is a bit pricey, but media specialists know that in the long run this book would survive rough handling much better than a paperback. 2006, Aladdin, $ 24.21. Ages 7 to 12.
—Ann Sanger <%ISBN%>1599610787
Children's Literature - Eileen Hanning
In this Pinky and Rex adventure, Rex gets the part Pinky wanted in the school play and their friendship suffers. Based on James Howe's experiences as a kid, this chapter book tells a compelling story set in a completely believable situation. In six short chapters Howe shows young readers both how a play gets made-from auditions to performance-and what Pinky and Rex learn about themselves and their friendship while participating in the play. Howe keeps the story moving with realistic dialog and a good dose of suspense: readers wonder if Pinky and Rex will be friends again, and if their performance in the school play will be successful. Sweet's watercolor illustrations are both effective and appealing. They convey some of the emotion and drama of the story, support the text, and break up the chapters-all of which are important elements of a well-constructed chapter book. James Howe includes a personal note at the end of this amusing story from the "Ready to Read" series.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3In this new entry in the series about best pals Pinky and Rex, their friendship is put to the greatest test ever. Pinky decides he wants to be an actor when he grows up and tries out for the lead in Davi, Boy of the Rain Forest. He convinces Rex to accompany him to the auditions for moral support. She isn't interested in acting at all. A big surprise awaits them when the cast list is posted. The play has been renamed Bahi, Girl of the Rain Forest, and Rex has the starring role. Pinky, who has been cast as a monkey, is angry with her. The two eventually realize that their friendship is much too valuable to lose, and Pinky tells Rex that she is good as Bahi. It is Pinky, however, who saves the performance from disaster. Howe fills the story with humorous scenes. Sweet's watercolors capture the action and complement the light mood. The ending, in which Pinky and Rex both order a hot fudge sundae with extra whipped cream "Because sometimes best friends just have to have the same thing," is totally satisfying.Suzanne Hawley, Laurel Oak Elementary School, Naples, FL
Kirkus Reviews
Pinky and Rex (Pinky and Rex and the Bully, 1996, etc.) return in this entry in the Ready-To-Read series, intended for emerging readers to tackle independently, with a plot to draw them in but little grace or style in the writing. Pinky wants to be the star in a school stage production; Rex isn't interested, although she attends the try-outs in support of Pinky. Predictably, Rex lands the lead; Pinky, given the role of a monkey, is mortified. In a huff, he stops speaking to Rex. Eventually, Pinky gets over his bruised ego—it doesn't hurt that he saves the play—and patches things up with Rex. Howe hits upon many sensitive issues here, from dashed hopes and inadequacy to envy and hurt feelings. He counters them with unforced forgiveness and some manner of acceptance from his characters: They may be hurt when things don't pan out, but they are open to finding something good and satisfying in the experience. Unfortunately, the language is inexorably sterile, without even the humor of previous Pinky and Rex installments. (Fiction. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613085489
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
04/01/1998
Series:
Pinky and Rex Series
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

James Howe is the author of more than seventy books for young

readers, including the popular and award-winning series about Bunnicula

and his friends. Among his other books are the Pinky and Rex series,

The Misfits, Totally Joe, and the Sebastian Barth mysteries.

James did not enjoy camping when he was a boy, but he did always wish he

had a pet skunk. He still does wish this at times, but for the most part

he's happy with the dog and two cats who share his home in New York State.

James Howe says:

"Back in the Olden Days, before there were such things as cable television

or DVDs, I loved staying up late at night to watch old horror movies on TV.

My favorites were the ones about hollow-eyed vampires and torch-bearing

peasants, or those with mad scientists whose accents fell somewhere

between Upper Mongolia and the Bronx. Nighty-Nightmare came out of

the affection I still feel for those movies and the laughs — along with

the chills — they gave me. Chester's story of how Bunnicula traveled from

Transylvania to America is a spoof of just about every old horror movie

I ever saw!"

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