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Pinocchio
     

Pinocchio

3.4 102
by Carlo Collodi, M. A. Murray (Translator), Jack Zipes (Introduction), Charles Folkard (Other)
 

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Pinocchio plays pranks upon the kindly woodcarver Geppetto, is duped by the Fox and the Cat, kills the pedantic Talking Cricket, and narrowly escapes death, with the help of the blue-haired Fairy. A wooden puppet without strings, Pinocchio is a tragicomic figure, a poor, illiterate, naughty peasant boy who has few choices in life but usually chooses to shirk his

Overview

Pinocchio plays pranks upon the kindly woodcarver Geppetto, is duped by the Fox and the Cat, kills the pedantic Talking Cricket, and narrowly escapes death, with the help of the blue-haired Fairy. A wooden puppet without strings, Pinocchio is a tragicomic figure, a poor, illiterate, naughty peasant boy who has few choices in life but usually chooses to shirk his responsibilities and get into trouble. This sly and imaginative novel, alternately catastrophic and ridiculous, takes Pinocchio from one predicament to the next, and finally to an optimistic, if uncertain, ending. In his compelling introduction, Jack Zipes places Pinocchio within the traditions of the oral folk tale and the literary fairy tale, showing how Collodi subverts those traditions while raising questions about "how we 'civilize' children in uncivilized times."

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Innocenti's luminous interpretation of Collodi's tale carves the action out of 19th century Italian landscapes. Clearly shown as a mocking marionette, this Pinocchio races through cobbled city scenes and then throws himself prostrate at the personal fairy whom he has most recently wronged by his hasty, thoughtless behavior. And when he becomes a real boy, the transformation is resounding: left slumped on a chair is the body of a puppet; readers may marvel that what lies so lifeless in that scene was the source of so much trouble earlier on. Enchantment reigns in the pictures, each a perfect elaboration of the text. Innocenti and Collodi are equally at home in a place where puppets have life beyond human hands, and where souls may die and live again, resurrected by the power of love. All ages. (Oct.)
Publishers Weekly
Two illustrated volumes of Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio take the spotlight this fall. Robert Ingpen's edition starts on a note of humor, with inset illustrations showcasing his meticulous ink lines and cross-hatching. He depicts the newly emerging Marionette wearing Geppetto's wig, for instance, or a full-page image of Geppetto fitting the fellow with new feet after the puppet's burn in a fire. A wordless spread of the Assassins making off with Pinocchio, however, exudes an appropriate creepiness. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
If the only image of the wooden boy that children have is the Disney puppet with his shock of black hair lovingly crafted by the gentle old Geppetto, then perhaps it is time to introduce them to the original. Not sanitized by Disney, this Pinocchio is revealed as sometimes arrogant, often naughty, very disobedient, but with an underlying desire to do what is right. There are plenty of adventures and misadventures for the wooden puppet who longs to be a boy. It is a cautionary tale, unabashed in its messages to children, that probably works best as a read aloud. What sets this edition apart from others is the handsome design. From the rich buff pages to the exquisite paintings of 19th century Italy, this is a work of art. Here is a classic that belongs on every bookshelf. 2005, Creative Editions, Ages 5 up.
—Beverley Fahey
Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
A veteran children's writer retells the story of Pinocchio and presents it as a thirteen scene play. He likens the metamorphosis of Pinocchio as the growth in character of all of us, and HE encourages readers to present it as a play to illustrate this fact. Pinocchio has not lost his timelessness and appeal, and this story is an opportunity for a group of children to explore his complex character in a more extended version.
Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
This particular version of the classic tale remains true to Collodi's story with some editing of the both chapters' lengths and some of Pinocchio's adventures. Pinocchio comes to life from a piece of wood and tries to be a good son to Geppetto but he gets led astray by first his own selfish nature and next by a troupe of puppets. After receiving mercy from the puppet master, Pinocchio tries to return to his father only to be distracted by a blind cat and fox. This encounter proves to almost be Pinocchio's undoing. Fortunately he is saved by the blue-haired girl, a fairy. One hopes that Pinocchio is soon reunited with his father; instead the puppet goes to prison. When he is released, he attempts to travel back to Geppetto but gets caught by a farmer. He wins his freedom but learns from a pigeon that Geppetto has gone to sea searching for Pinocchio. Eventually Pinocchio reunites with his father in a shark's belly and manages to learn courage. In this version, a talking cricket does try to guide Pinocchio. One would choose this version of Pinocchio for a faithful and well-illustrated classic story, as the highlight of the book are the finely crafted drawings by Greban. The chapters are a wonderful length for reading aloud but be warned that the story does slow near the end and may confuse younger readers. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk
School Library Journal
Gr 2-7-The classic moral tale of the wayward puppet's quest to become a real boy is illustrated with Ingpen's richly textured pencil-and-watercolor artwork. A combination of full-page illustration and spreads, as well as numerous smaller pictures, depicts Pinocchio's adventures. Ingpen's color choices-primarily subdued neutral tones accented with bright hues-underscore the sense of play in a rather grim story. The bright-eyed marionette is portrayed as more mischievous than malicious-more naive than nasty. Even as a puppet, his posture and movements are that of an active, curious child. Likewise, the narration is lively and energetic and seasoned with subtle humor. The dark sides of the tale are not omitted, but the focus is on the adventure and on Pinocchio's redemption. Some of the modernization is unnecessary and awkward; for example, the Cat receives a telegram, rather than message, informing him that his child is ill. Overall, this is a handsome traditional edition of the story that will appeal to children. The Adventures of Pinocchio illustrated by Robert Innocenti (Creative Editions, 2005) is a more literary version with a stronger sense of the European setting, dramatic tension, and moral undertones. Sara Fanelli's version (Candlewick, 2003) offers a more contemporary collage-style interpretation.-Heide Piehler, Shorewood Public Library, WI Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
What most readers know of Pinocchio is a wooden puppet whose nose grows from telling lies. This episode—longer than a picture book but shorter than the original tale—is one small chapter in the exploits and adventures of Pinocchio, the boy wannabe. An illustrated adaptation, it follows the original M.A. Murray translation closely, yet succeeds without the long-windedness of the 1892 classic, and with all the rich language, spirited characters, and lively escapades intact. Inspired by the commedia dell'arte, the Italian traveling street theater of Collodi's time, Young (Night Visitors, 1995, etc.) has created scenes that authentically capture the playlike quality of the story. Reminiscent of his colorful cut-paper collage in Seven Blind Mice (1993), the array of characters and images cleverly reflect a stage production, complete with double-page spreads that act as scenery backdrops. It's an energetic rendition that invites the audience to meet again the mischievous puppet with all his foibles, setting the stage for an Oz-like ending that reaffirms the power of good.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142437063
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/30/2002
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
734,969
Product dimensions:
5.04(w) x 7.74(h) x 0.53(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

Table of Contents

Title Page

Copyright Page

Introduction

 

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

VII

VIII

IX

X

XI

XII

XIII

XIV

XV

XVI

XVII

XVIII

XIX

XX

XXI

XXII

XXIII

XXIV

XXV

XXVI

XXVII

XXVIII

XXIX

XXX

XXXI

XXXII

XXXIII

XXXIV

XXXV

XXXVI

PINOCCHIO

Meet the Author

Carlo Collodi (Carlo Lorenzini, 1826–90) was a journalist from Florence who took part in Italy’s struggle for independence and died too soon to witness the international success of his children’s book.

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Pinocchio 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 102 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Suggest sample chapter first or borrow
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It has too many cus words i hate it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Perfactally fun and adventures make you laugh sometimes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought there was only a movie incredible.the thing is i love disney so this is awsome i have never seen a disney book before movies great books awsooooome :()
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow i saw peoples comments and it left me thinking "is this story really that bad " please if the autor read these comments he or she would be very sad so please if yu have nothing nice to post dont post anything and thank yu for yout time
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hate it i cant understand it they dont sat who is talking! Do not get this book it is a relly bad chilldrens book!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not like the rral one
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