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Pip Squeak (I Can Read Book 1 Series)
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Pip Squeak (I Can Read Book 1 Series)

4.5 2
by Sarah Weeks, Jane Manning (Illustrator), Jane K. Manning (Illustrator)
 

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Pip Squeak is a busy mouse.
Today he has to clean his house.
He has to get it done by three.
A friend is stopping by for tea.

A visit from his friend Max turns Pip Squeak into a cleaning whirlwind. He scrubs and brushes and vacuums and flushes until his house is perfectly neat. But wouldn't you know it, after all that hard work, Max doesn't even

Overview

Pip Squeak is a busy mouse.
Today he has to clean his house.
He has to get it done by three.
A friend is stopping by for tea.

A visit from his friend Max turns Pip Squeak into a cleaning whirlwind. He scrubs and brushes and vacuums and flushes until his house is perfectly neat. But wouldn't you know it, after all that hard work, Max doesn't even wipe his feet before he comes inside! And that's only the beginning. Before long, Pip Squeak's house is a complete disaster.

Sarah Weeks's animated story and Jane Manning's delightful illustrations will enchant beginning readers as they follow Pip Squeak, the star of Drip, Drop, in his second comic adventure.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Joyce Rice
Pip Squeak is expecting company, and, as the reader has learned from the previous book, Pip Squeak is a worker. Pip Squeak the mouse has decided to clean his house from top to bottom before his friend arrives. He sweeps, vacuums, and mops his floors, cleans the walls, steps, and furniture, then washes all the dishes. Then he settles down to have a nice cup of tea when his friend arrives. Max the red fox appears at his door and destroys all of his good work. Max does not wipe his feet before coming in, and he leaves muddy tracks all over Pip Squeak's clean floor. When Pip Squeak complains, Max gets busy restoring order, albeit a little dangerously and noisily. The rhythm and repeated sounds of the text will have young readers wanting to hear the story again and again. The author's use of repetition will help them to learn new words and new sounds. This is a level one book of the "I Can Read" series. Ms. Manning's drawings of the two characters are delightful. This is a great read-aloud for grandparents, and will hang around to become an early reader for each child privileged enough to own it. It is also a must have for classrooms serving these young readers. Reviewer: Joyce Rice
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2- The adorable mouse from Drip, Drop (HarperCollins, 2000) is back. "Pip Squeak is a busy mouse. Today he has to clean his house. He has to get it done by three. A friend is stopping by for tea." In a flurry of activity, he sweeps, mops, dusts, vacuums, and scrubs his house from top to bottom. When the doorbell rings, Pip Squeak eagerly welcomes his friend Max. Sadly, Max is a terrible guest and makes a mess of everything, tracking footprints everywhere and throwing his coat on the floor. He eventually realizes that he has upset his host and tries to make amends by cleaning up after himself. Clearly his efforts fall short, as he is depicted standing on a table while he mops a chair. Pip Squeak forgives him in the end, but suggests that next time, he visit Max instead. This simple, engaging narrative is perfect for children learning to read, with accompanying artwork that is just as entertaining as the text. The illustrations are filled with amusing details, such as a couch upholstered in a Swiss cheese motif, and they provide good picture cues. A welcome addition to any early-reader collection.-Melinda Piehler, Sawgrass Elementary School, Sunrise, FL

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Weeks and Manning team up for a second successful easy reader starring Pip Squeak the mouse, this time joined by his friend Max, a messy and nmisbehaving fox. In short, rhyming text, Weeks follows Pip Squeak as he cleans his entire house in preparation for a tea-time visit, with added humor from lots of repeating cleaning sounds. When the boisterous fox arrives, he tracks in mud, bounces on the bed, knocks over furniture and literally swings from the chandelier, making Pip Squeak both sad and mad. Max finally does clean up his own messes and sits still for a cup of tea, setting up the concluding line that Pip Squeak would prefer to visit Max at his house next time. Busy, action-filled illustrations in bright hues incorporate the text into softly shaded sections of the art for a pleasing design that seamlessly integrates words and pictures. Children who are just beginning to read on their own will enjoy this easy and humorous story, which could also serve as a read-aloud for younger preschoolers. (Easy reader. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060756352
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/03/2007
Series:
I Can Read Book 1 Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Sarah Weeks is an author, singer, and songwriter. Her many books for children include the My First I Can Read Book Splish, Splash!, illustrated by Ashley Wolff, Mrs. McNosh Hangs Up Her Wash, illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott, and the middle-grade novel regular guy. Ms. Weeks lives in New York City.

Jane Manning is the illustrator of dozens of children's books, including the I Can Read! Books Baa-Choo! by Sarah Weeks and the New York Times bestselling The Witch Who Was Afraid of Witches by Alice Low. She currently lives in Deep River, Connecticut.

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Pip Squeak 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
ShellyPA More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up at the library to start and teach my son to read and he absolutley loved it. I had to order it because we finally had to return it to the library. He memorized the whole story, word for word. We read it every night before bed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago