Pippin the Christmas Pig

Pippin the Christmas Pig

by Jean Little, Werner Zimmermann
     
 

Pippin the pig shows the boasting barn animals that giving of yourself is the best Christmas gift of all.

Tomorrow is Christmas, and all the animals are boasting to little Pippin the pig about the important gifts their VERY-great-grandparents gave to the special baby that was born in a stable long ago. When Pippin wants to know what the pigs gave, the animals

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Overview

Pippin the pig shows the boasting barn animals that giving of yourself is the best Christmas gift of all.

Tomorrow is Christmas, and all the animals are boasting to little Pippin the pig about the important gifts their VERY-great-grandparents gave to the special baby that was born in a stable long ago. When Pippin wants to know what the pigs gave, the animals scoff - what could a pig have given a holy child? Dejected, Pippin heads out alone into a raging snow storm. There he meets a lost mother and baby, and leads them to the warmth of the barn. And in caring for this family in need, the animals see that giving of yourself is the best Christmas gift of all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A perky pink piglet starts the barnyard buzzing when she asks "What's Christmas?" in this clever and gentle-hearted picture book. Pippin's question gets the goat of Noddy the grumpy donkey, whose ancestors carried Mary to Bethlehem. A haughty game of can-you-top-that gets all the farm animals going, each taking credit for a role in the first Christmas and dismissing pigs altogether. But it's not until Pippin tries to run away that she finds the joyous meaning of the holiday. Zimmerman's watercolors pleasingly mix realism and adorability (in the case of Pippin's smile). Ages 4-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
We often wonder what the best Christmas present would be. In a stable fresh with straw all the animals are proudly talking about their great great grandparents' gift to the Baby. But one's not talking; it's Pippin, whose relatives were not there. He had not heard anything about Christmas. Looked down upon by the cow, the donkey and the sheep, Pippin leaves the barn, rejected, vowing never to return. Into the snowy night he goes and meets a tired young women with a hungry baby. He knows what to do and leads them back to the barn. The other animals almost don't let them in, being too busy preparing for that special Baby. Pippin reveals the real meaning of Christmas by telling them all babies are special and the greatest gift we can give is ourselves. In luscious warm earth tones, Zimmerman captures the quietness and heart of this touching story and makes a gentle statement about a materialistic world. 2004, Scholastic Press, Ages 4 up.
—Sue Stefurak
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-When the animals in the barn boast about the important roles their ancestors played during the first Christmas, Pippin the pig is so upset to learn that her ancestors didn't give a gift that she runs off into the snow. Miraculously (and a bit jarringly), she meets a homeless mother and her baby and leads them to the stable, where she convinces the other animals to help them. The point about the best gift being kindness and love may be lost on small children, who will like this book for the interplay among the animals and for the sweet portrayal of the endearing Pippin. The atmospheric watercolor-and-pencil illustrations are full of child appeal, with Pippin (who looks like a cross between Wilbur and Olivia) standing out pinkly against the dark barn and snowy fields.-E. M. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Pippin is a cute little piglet with one ear that tends to flop over like a puppy's. She lives in a barn with a donkey, a cow, a sheep, and a pigeon, all descendents of the animals who were in the stable in Bethlehem on the first Christmas. The animals brag about the superiority of their ancestors and the gifts they provided to the baby in the manger, while rejecting Pippin (and pigs in general) and her innocent questions about the meaning of Christmas. The soft-focus watercolor-and-pencil illustrations capture Pippin's child-like expressions along with the scornful faces of the barnyard braggarts. When Pippin leaves and ventures out into the snow on Christmas Eve, she finds a young homeless woman struggling to carry a baby girl. Pippin brings them back to the barn, the baby falls asleep in the manger, and the animals all provide the same sort of comforting gifts once given by their ancestors, finally acknowledging Pippin and her important contribution. This gently told story shows insight into the feelings of one who feels small and insignificant, but who can still accomplish something special. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439650625
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
10/28/2004
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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