Pirates Go to School

( 1 )

Overview


A funny rhyming story about the silly things pirates do when they go to school.

Pirates and their parrots go to school, and it's time to hang up their swords and have fun. They learn reading and math, and they bring pirate treasure for show-and-tell. For pirates, going to school is as much fun as a game of "walk the plank"!

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Hardcover
$13.69
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $9.08   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview


A funny rhyming story about the silly things pirates do when they go to school.

Pirates and their parrots go to school, and it's time to hang up their swords and have fun. They learn reading and math, and they bring pirate treasure for show-and-tell. For pirates, going to school is as much fun as a game of "walk the plank"!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When pirates go to school, they bring their parrots and hang their swords on the coat rack, and if you sit next to one, "better hold your nose because/ they smell of rotting fish." These elementary-age swashbucklers, like their more conventional peers, can be unruly, enthusiastic, and obedient—sure, they get in trouble for swearing and threaten mutiny, but they also happily participate in arts and crafts and clean up after their messes. Demas offers some fun phrases throughout, while Manders creates a cast of amiable ruffians that most kids would be happy to spend the day with. Ages 3–8. (July)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—What would pirates do at school? The question is answered in rhyming verse and lighthearted cartoon images. With swords neatly hung in the coatroom and parrots echoing a greeting to the teacher, the pirates attack their lessons: "X (marks the spot), Y, Z." A little art, a storytime about ships at sea, math with "skull" counting manipulatives, treasure maps for show-and-tell, and "walk the plank" on the playground fill the day. The eager-to-learn pirates learn to clean up after their parrots and not to swear (lest they suffer a time-out). Boldly colored scenes in watercolor, gouache, and colored pencil are paired with a nonthreatening ensemble, introducing imaginative readers to a typical school day. Details on each page encourage searching for images associated with these seafaring scoundrels—down to the school bus marked with a skull and crossbones. A humorous read and a general purchase for most libraries.—Mary Elam, Learning Media Services, Plano ISD, TX
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Pirates burst into the classroom at the beginning of the school day, much to the consternation of the teacher and the amazement of the students who simply watch their activities all day long. These pirates and their parrots learn their letters, do arithmetic ("Two skulls plus one is three"), and make clay cannonballs in art class. They play on the playground where their favorite game is "walk the plank." The teacher gets them back on track. They delight in story time and even spin some yarns of their own. At the end of the day, they clean up after their parrots and head for the school bus. The cartoon-style illustrations play up the silly antics of these unusual adult students. The lines of the text are rather mundane. The bouncy rhythm of the four-line rhyming text (five lines when the parrots parrot the words of the pirates) is smoother on some pages than others. On the first page, the pirate swords are hanging on the coat rack before the pirates enter the classroom. Other little touches, such as the skull and crossbones on the front of the school bus, add to the humor. Some may find the raucous absurdity here to be just the thing to get a pirate-loving, back-to-school class to sit up, laugh, and then begin to focus on the new school year. Reviewer: Sharon Salluzzo
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—What would pirates do at school? The question is answered in rhyming verse and lighthearted cartoon images. With swords neatly hung in the coatroom and parrots echoing a greeting to the teacher, the pirates attack their lessons: "X (marks the spot), Y, Z." A little art, a storytime about ships at sea, math with "skull" counting manipulatives, treasure maps for show-and-tell, and "walk the plank" on the playground fill the day. The eager-to-learn pirates learn to clean up after their parrots and not to swear (lest they suffer a time-out). Boldly colored scenes in watercolor, gouache, and colored pencil are paired with a nonthreatening ensemble, introducing imaginative readers to a typical school day. Details on each page encourage searching for images associated with these seafaring scoundrels—down to the school bus marked with a skull and crossbones. A humorous read and a general purchase for most libraries.—Mary Elam, Learning Media Services, Plano ISD, TX
Kirkus Reviews

Demas' latest throws together adult pirates and regular kids at school, but the combination doesn't really mesh, making it unsuccessful either at familiarizing kids with school or providing swashbuckling entertainment.

Readers follow the antics of a crew of pirates through a typical elementary school day. They hang their swords in the coatroom, make clay cannonballs in art class, share treasure maps at show-and-tell time, have squid for lunch, snore through nap time, get scolded for swearing at recess and clean up at the end of the day. "Pirates learn their letters: / X (marks the spot), Y, Z. / Pirates learn arithmetic: / Two skulls plus one is three." While Demas' rhymes mostly rollick, a few miss the beat, and the parrots' habit of repeating everything after the pirates gets a little old. Manders' watercolor, gouache and colored pencil artwork is delightfully silly, full of details that maximize the incongruity of the contrast between pirates and kindergartners. But he ultimately fails to bring the pirates and kids together, creating a separation that dooms the book—the kids are merely uncertain and insecure onlookers to the pirates' activities.

Don't be hornswoggled—give this the heave-ho and seek pirate (and school) booty elsewhere. (Picture book. 4-7)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780545206297
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/1/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 308,950
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD680L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Corinne Demas is the award-winning author of numerous books for children and adults, including THE LITTLEST MATRYOSHKA, ALWAYS IN TROUBLE, PIRATES GO TO SCHOOL, and SAYING GOODBYE TO LULU. She is a professor of English at Mount Holyoke College and lives with her family in Western Massachusetts. Her website is www.corinnedemas.com.

John Manders’s illustrations have been featured in more than thirty children’s books, including LEWIS AND CLARK: A PRAIRIE DOG FOR THE PRESIDENT, GOLDIE SOCKS AND THE THREE LIBEARIANS, and THE PERFECT NEST. He lives in Franklin, Pennsylvania, with his wife, Lisa. Visit him online at www.johnmanders.com.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 24, 2011

    Yo Ho Ho

    This book is fun from start to finish, and what a great way to introduce kids to what goes on during the school day.
    The rhymes are lively and clever, and the illustrations bright and spunky. A perfect read-aloud.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)