Pish and Posh Wish for Fairy Wings (I Can Read Series Level 2)

Overview

Pish and Posh are ready to be fairies! To get their fairy wings they must make a wise wish. But wishing wisely is not so easy, especially when two friends don’t always agree.

This first title in a new series introduces an original cast of characters. Pish is tidy, and her best friend Posh is a bit flighty. Pish and Posh usually get along, until Posh discovers a book of fairy magic on their doorstep.

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Overview

Pish and Posh are ready to be fairies! To get their fairy wings they must make a wise wish. But wishing wisely is not so easy, especially when two friends don’t always agree.

This first title in a new series introduces an original cast of characters. Pish is tidy, and her best friend Posh is a bit flighty. Pish and Posh usually get along, until Posh discovers a book of fairy magic on their doorstep.

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Editorial Reviews

The Horn Book
“Wish for a sequel.”
Publishers Weekly
This whimsical I Can Read Book by husband-and-wife collaborators (It's Not Marsha's Birthday) opens with a bang-literally: "After dinner, there was a loud thud outside the front door." Racing to the doorstep, a delighted Posh discovers a copy of The Fairy Handbook while her more sensible, skeptical best friend and housemate Pish firmly declares, "We are not becoming fairies." Posh obviously has other ideas, as she scans the tome in a futile attempt to discover a fairy's method for doing dishes quickly. She fails to read the instructions closely, however, and when a wand appears at the door, she waves it with cheerful abandon, causing "mountains of suds" to escape from the sink. The youngster's subsequent (mis)use of the handbook to retrieve her friend Izzy's missing dog brings similarly outlandish results, as Posh inadvertently conjures up a troll, mermaid and giant-but no pooch. The much taller, sophisticatedly dressed Pish presents quite a contrast to Posh, who sports a yellow polka-dotted frock and an oversize hair bow, but the two do share several characteristics-brilliant red tresses out of which poke elfin ears, providing an extra dollop of fun. Bottner's buoyant pictures feature comical facial expressions, adding the right tone to this breezy portrait of an opposites-attract friendship. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The "I Can Read" books have been a classic staple for beginning readers since Else Homelund Minarik and Maurice Sendak's Little Bear. Now along come best friends Pish and Posh, with humor, whimsy and charming characters, delightfully illustrated in bright colors by Bottner. Pish, the oldest, and Posh are just finishing dinner when—WHAM!—something lands on their steps. The Fairy Handbook! Posh readily concludes that it would be a great idea to become fairies. Pish is not so sure, since Posh's ideas usually have a knack for turning out badly. But Posh pushes on, beginning with applying a little fairy magic to the dirty dishes, then locating her friend Izzy's lost dog. A fairy wand and dust, also discovered on the steps should help. A flood, troll, giant, under-the-bed monster and mermaid later, Posh concedes that reading the whole chapter, even though it's long, might be a good idea. And that's where Pish comes in to rescue the day. This is a charming book; hand it to a new reader and he or she will be clamoring for more Pish and Posh adventures. And did anyone notice the fairy ears sprouting on their heads? 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 4 to 8.
—Judy Crowder
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Pish and Posh desperately want to get their fairy wings, but they must use their four wishes wisely to earn them. That, it turns out, is not so easy. Pish gets angry when Posh burns the toast at breakfast, and Posh runs to her room in a huff and throws herself on the bed. Suddenly a new character enters the scene—the Monster Under the Bed aka Mub. He sympathizes with Posh. When Pish arrives on the scene, the two have another little spat and Pish wishs that Posh would listen and do things correctly. As Mub points out, it is a wish that Pish will regret. The two friends manage to waste most of their wishes due to disagreements and bad tempers. In the end, they come to terms with each other and through cooperation do everything right and earn their fairy wings. The story teaches a lesson in a way that is entertaining, and the illustrations by Bottner add quite a bit to the humor. Kids who read this book will probably want to read the first one and any stories that follow involving these fairy friends. A Level 2 book in the "I Can Read!" series.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-This book scores a hit with two well-defined characters: irrepressible, curious, impatient Posh and the more mature and methodical Pish. When a copy of The Fairy Handbook is mysteriously left on their doorstep, Posh can't wait to give it a try but Pish insists that her friend must first finish her chores. However, Posh is not discouraged, and she attempts to cast several spells without reading all of the fine print. Before long, she discovers that finding a magical solution to a problem sometimes creates an even greater dilemma. Although this beginning reader has the requisite large font and controlled vocabulary, nothing is lost in the story's simple presentation, and the plot builds to a satisfying climax. Strategically placed to aid new readers, Bottner's humorous illustrations convey the action well. The characters, who have elfin ears, are delightfully drawn and full of expression. An excellent addition to any library, this story will keep youngsters quickly turning pages and persevering until the last line.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The second title in the series reintroduces Pish and Posh, fairies-in-training bent on acquiring wings. Pish is older and bossier; her best friend Posh is both subservient and rebellious, like a little sister. Debuting here is Mub, the "Monster Under the Bed," a lupine beast with ample good sense and advice that's initially ignored. The girls' magical wishes go haywire; they scrap, then make up, and there are some bright, funny bits, as when Posh, discovering the empathetic Mub, says, "Whoever you are . . . I love you!" The circumstances under which each fairy gets her wings might be unclear to the intended age range, and the fairies' petulance wears a bit thin. Bottner depicts them with oddly cloven-looking slippered feet and pointy, cat-like ears. A lesser light in the I Can Read series. (Easy reader. 5-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060514211
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/13/2007
  • Series: I Can Read Book 2 Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 794,167
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara Bottner is the author of many favorites for young readers, including Rosa's Room, illustrated by Beth Spiegel; the ever-popular Bootsie Barker Bites, illustrated by Peggy Rathmann; and Bootsie Barker Ballerina, also an I Can Read Book, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Together with her husband, Gerald Kruglik, Ms. Bottner has authored the award-winning picture book Wallace's Lists, illustrated by Olof Landström, and the I Can Read Book Pish and Posh, which she illustrated.

Barbara Bottner is the author of many favorites for young readers, including Rosa's Room, illustrated by Beth Spiegel; the ever-popular Bootsie Barker Bites, illustrated by Peggy Rathmann; and Bootsie Barker Ballerina, also an I Can Read Book, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Together with her husband, Gerald Kruglik, Ms. Bottner has authored the award-winning picture book Wallace's Lists, illustrated by Olof Landström, and the I Can Read Book Pish and Posh, which she illustrated.

Gerald Kruglik is the coauthor of Pish and Posh and Wallace's List. The author lives in Florida.

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