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The Pitch That Killed
     

The Pitch That Killed

5.0 1
by Mike Sowell
 

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On a torridly hot August day in 1920, Ray Chapman was struck and killed by a Carl Mays fastball, in what was and remains the only on-the-field fatality in the history of major league baseball. The drama of Good Guy Chapman versus Bad Guy Mays is a wrenching human tale. Add to it an intense pennant race, the meteoric ascension of Babe Ruth to baseball supremacy, the

Overview

On a torridly hot August day in 1920, Ray Chapman was struck and killed by a Carl Mays fastball, in what was and remains the only on-the-field fatality in the history of major league baseball. The drama of Good Guy Chapman versus Bad Guy Mays is a wrenching human tale. Add to it an intense pennant race, the meteoric ascension of Babe Ruth to baseball supremacy, the banning of the Black Sox for throwing the previous year's World Series, and the story grows to one of the most fascinating and compelling in the annals of baseball history.Mike Sowell's brilliant account of the events of 1920—meticulously researched and mellifluously written—captures all the intensity of the moment of the Chapman beaning and the entire incredible season. Only a writer of Sowell's power and skill could do justice to such a tale, and the result is one of the most highly respected and widely acclaimed baseball books ever written.The Summer Game Books edition is the first and only eBook of this classic, and features an exclusive new epilogue by the author, with 25 years of perspective, during which time the legends of Mays, Chapman, and Chapman's replacement, Joe Sewell, have only grown.

Editorial Reviews

Poughkeepsie Journal
"A 2004 Best bet.... Glorious and horrifying baseball book..."
Baseball Book Survey
"A fascinating study of the circumstances behind the only time a major leaguer was ever killed by a pitched ball."
The Oregonian
"Sowell thoroughly explored the horrifying incident...and provided fascinating historical context."
Orlando Sentinal
"Sowell...did a masterful job...in bringing to life the incident and all...that [was] going on in baseball then."
Oregonian
Sowell thoroughly explored that horrifying incident in his 1989 book and provided fascinating historical context.
Mudville
…An outstanding book…. In short, one hell of a year, which Sowell captures perfectly.
Golfdom
Sowell's outstanding book tells the story of both men and of the thrilling pennant race that followed Chapman's death.
ESPN Magazine
The best baseball book no one has read.
Roger Kahn
Splendidly researched and vivid as today....Remarkable.
Orlando Sentinel - Phil Tatman
Sowell did a masterful job of research in bringing to life the incident and all the things that were going on in baseball then.
Chicago Tribune - Mark Luce
Sowell twirls tragedy with triumph in a thoroughly engaging manner and delivers a book as captivating as it is well-written.
ESPN the Magazine
The best baseball book no one has read.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940152385342
Publisher:
Summer Game Books
Publication date:
09/30/2015
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
322,131
File size:
3 MB

What People are Saying About This

MUDVILLE
...An outstanding book.... In short, one hell of a year, which Sowell captures perfectly.

Meet the Author

Mike Sowell teaches journalism at Oklahoma State University. He has also written One Pitch Away: The Players' Stories of the 1986 League Championships and World Series. He lives in Stillwater, Oklahoma, outside of Oklahoma City.

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Pitch That Killed 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
faunster More than 1 year ago
The terrible and sole tragedy of a death on the field from a bean ball in MLB is brought to life in this true story of Ray Chapman and Carl Mays.The writing is compelling and the story is as engrossing as a thriller novel.Kudos to mike Sowell for a haunting read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mike Sowell's The Pitch That Killed is one of the finest pieces of baseball writing. Sowell's research is exhaustive and writing is exciting. Sowell transports the reader back to 1920. You're with Chapman and Mays that day. Some paint Mays as an angry, headhunter, but Sowell brings depth to Mays. Sowell has written two top notch baseball books (the other is on Ed Delahanty). Let's hope he writes another historican piece soon.